HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Four Loves (1960)

by C. S. Lewis

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
7,979451,095 (4.03)1 / 45
A repackaged edition of the revered author's classic work that examines the four types of human love: affection, friendship, erotic love, and the love of God-part of the C. S. Lewis Signature Classics series. C.S. Lewis-the great British writer, scholar, lay theologian, broadcaster, Christian apologist, and bestselling author of Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, The Chronicles of Narnia, and many other beloved classics-contemplates the essence of love and how it works in our daily lives in one of his most famous works of nonfiction. Lewis examines four varieties of human love: affection, the most basic form; friendship, the rarest and perhaps most insightful; Eros, passionate love; charity, the greatest and least selfish. Throughout this compassionate and reasoned study, he encourages readers to open themselves to all forms of love-the key to understanding that brings us closer to God.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

Group TopicMessagesLast Message 
 Friends of Jack (C.S. Lewis): The Four Loves7 unread / 7eschator83, December 2016

» See also 45 mentions

English (41)  Spanish (2)  Czech (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  All languages (45)
Showing 1-5 of 41 (next | show all)
study of love
  SrMaryLea | Aug 22, 2023 |
At his best Lewis can be very good (Screwtape Letters, Mere Christianity), but at other times he can be a bit frustrating. He has an excellent mind overstuffed with knowledge of many fine things, he’s often insightful, and he’s able to write engagingly and accessibly while fleshing out a carefully conceived and detailed plan. But when he’s not at his best there can be too much wordplay and other cleverness combined with an over-certain pedagogy, or at least that’s how it comes off for me. It’s particularly frustrating when there are a lot of good ideas and connections that you know could be deepened with more reflection and care. While clearing out the underbrush. You might say someone with his gifts has kind of an obligation to use them carefully and well for the greater good. Of course you might not say that, but let’s assume you might. At times this book feels like it was tossed off by an unusually gifted journalist. It’s a good book, but you get the sense that it could have been much better. At least I get that sense. And the material is important - it merits the best effort. Lewis wrote about the psychic and spiritual drain that Screwtape caused him, getting into the skin of a senior demon for the duration of its writing, and how he could never do that again to write a sequel despite many requests. I’m grateful that he put himself through that, and maybe he didn’t really have an obligation to sweat more to make this book better. But I do wish he had. ( )
  garbagedump | Dec 9, 2022 |
CS Lewis explores the joys-and dangers, of various aspects of love. Affection, friendship, eros, and charity, and how ultimately it's rooted in a love for God and the love God gifts to us.

The true insights here are CS Lewis' deconstructions of false loves; the idea that one needs to be needed, the idea that sexual intimacy is true eroticism, the idea that a guarded heart can lead to less pain-all of these are masterfully broken down to demonstrate that true love is none of those things. Good loves taken to a God love turns love into a demon.

A great read, although sometimes challenging due to the nature of the references that surely would have made sense back in the early 20th century, has gone lost on me(Google was a huge help here). Some of CS Lewis' views on gender and on friendship have not aged well, but nevertheless provide helpful analogies to his larger points which remain timeless. ( )
  gingsing27 | Jul 8, 2022 |
Excellent. Classic Lewis. ( )
  Michael_J | Jun 2, 2022 |
excellent. Classic Lewis, as usual. I always thoroughly enjoy C.S. Lewis, even if I can't always keep up with him. ( )
  Michael_J | Jun 2, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 41 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (10 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
C. S. Lewisprimary authorall editionscalculated
Nieminen, TaistoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Noble, PeterNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Notable Lists

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
That our affection kill us not, nor dye. -- Donne
Dedication
to Chad Walsh
First words
"God is love," says St. John. When I first tried to write this book I thought that his maxim would provide me with a very plain highroad through the whole subject.
Quotations
But very few modern people think Friendship a love of comparable value or even a love at all.
(p. 87)
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
A repackaged edition of the revered author's classic work that examines the four types of human love: affection, friendship, erotic love, and the love of God-part of the C. S. Lewis Signature Classics series. C.S. Lewis-the great British writer, scholar, lay theologian, broadcaster, Christian apologist, and bestselling author of Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Great Divorce, The Chronicles of Narnia, and many other beloved classics-contemplates the essence of love and how it works in our daily lives in one of his most famous works of nonfiction. Lewis examines four varieties of human love: affection, the most basic form; friendship, the rarest and perhaps most insightful; Eros, passionate love; charity, the greatest and least selfish. Throughout this compassionate and reasoned study, he encourages readers to open themselves to all forms of love-the key to understanding that brings us closer to God.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
FROM THE BACK COVER:

In this, one of his most popular books, C. S. Lewis sheds light on the eternally provocative subject of love.

With his characteristic insight, humor, and acute judgment, Lewis categorizes and describes all the natural loves. Affection binds parents and children, neighbors who have nothing in common, humans and their pets; it is love owed, rather than earned; it grows out of familiarity; it "is indeed the least discriminating of loves." Eros - not pure physicality but the more complex feeling of being "in love" - may inspire great sacrifice, but to potentially destructive ends. Friendship is "the least biological of our loves," the most spiritual in nature, but also the most inclined to snobbery. Each of these loves has its particular joys, and each its own proximity to hatred.

For Lewis, no natural love can prosper except in the presence of the Fourth Love, Charity, which is both the love of God and the selfless love of others. And though every kind of love carries its particular risks, Lewis exhorts us not to avoid them, for "hell is the only place outside of heaven where we can be safe from the dangers of love."

"The Four Loves [is] a modern mirror of souls ... of the virtues and failings of modern loving. Lewis combines a novelist's insight into motives with a profound religious understanding of our human nature." -Martin D'Arcy, The New York Times Book Review

C. S. Lewis was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, in 1898 and died in Oxford, England, in 1963. He held the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University and was the author of numerous books on Christianity, a science fiction trilogy, a novel, three volumes of poetry, and many works of literary criticism. He was also the author of the much-loved children's series The Chronicles of Narnia.
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.03)
0.5 2
1 7
1.5 1
2 28
2.5 4
3 135
3.5 18
4 300
4.5 24
5 249

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 204,177,098 books! | Top bar: Always visible