HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Invisible Bridge by Julie Orringer
Loading...

The Invisible Bridge (2010)

by Julie Orringer

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,238None6,395 (4.18)300
2010 (8) 2011 (9) 2012 (6) architecture (19) brothers (16) Budapest (24) ebook (12) Europe (7) family (9) fiction (132) France (24) historical (15) historical fiction (80) Holocaust (73) Hungary (100) Jewish (9) Jews (35) love (10) love story (9) novel (21) own (7) Paris (53) read (10) read in 2011 (15) romance (13) survival (11) to-read (60) unread (6) war (11) WWII (121)
  1. 20
    The History of Love by Nicole Krauss (SimoneA)
    SimoneA: Both of these books are beautifully told novels, set in World War II.
  2. 20
    22 Britannia Road by Amanda Hodgkinson (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: Both novels deal with Eastern Europe during WWII and with the stress that war and separation puts on a marriage.
  3. 00
    Four Mothers: A Novel by Shifra Horn (one-horse.library)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 300 mentions

English (98)  Norwegian (2)  Spanish (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (102)
Showing 1-5 of 98 (next | show all)
""He could see the inchworm in his mind even now, that snip of green elastic with it's tiny blunt legs, coiling and stretching its way toward the tabletop, on a mission whose nature was a mystery. Survival, he understood now - that was all. That contracting and straining, that frantic rearing-up to look around: It was nothing less than the urgent business of staying alive." p437"
— Julie Orringer (The Invisible Bridge)

I think this quote also describes the length and breadth of this book; slowly coiling and stretching it's way through it's story. ( )
  FAR2MANYBOOKS | Apr 5, 2014 |
""He could see the inchworm in his mind even now, that snip of green elastic with it's tiny blunt legs, coiling and stretching its way toward the tabletop, on a mission whose nature was a mystery. Survival, he understood now - that was all. That contracting and straining, that frantic rearing-up to look around: It was nothing less than the urgent business of staying alive." p437"
— Julie Orringer (The Invisible Bridge)

I think this quote also describes the length and breadth of this book; slowly coiling and stretching it's way through it's story. ( )
  FAR2MANYBOOKS | Apr 5, 2014 |
Long...slow to build, but in the end very rewarding. It begins as a romance and flows into something else entirely....although the love story remains constant throughout. Both Paris and Budapest (1937 through 1946) become characters important to the book. I learned so much about Hungarian history that I had never known. This is a very moving book. ( )
1 vote m2snick | Feb 19, 2014 |
Learning and reading about the Holocaust was a big part of my childhood, and--possibly as a result--I don't gravitate toward Holocaust-related literature as an adult. However, after reading Julie Orringer's short story collection years ago, I thought she had the potential to write a brilliant novel. (Actually, I still think so.) Anyway, that's why I decided to read this enormous novel about the Holocaust.

The first time I tried to read it, I petered out after a few chapters. Two years later, I picked it up again and got so wrapped up in it that I lost sleep and had to finish it within a couple days. It was really gripping.

That said...I didn't love it. The writing was good, but not breathtakingly beautiful. And you have to realize what you're getting in for when you read a book about European Jews during the Holocaust: a litany of injustices, evil jerks prospering by being evil jerks, flagrant suffering, deaths of good people over and over again. Speaking of which, I'm so aggrieved that Tibor died. I loved Tibor. Fine, you can argue that it was inevitable after his wife and son died. All the same...fuck that, I don't approve in the slightest.

My favorite part was certainly Andras and Klara in Paris, back before the book became wall-to-wall horrors, when it still seemed like a grand adventure. I guess my advice to anyone considering reading this book is not to delude yourself about what comes next.

PS I am sending all my love to Eli Polaner. ( )
  thatotter | Feb 6, 2014 |
The story of a Hungarian Jewish man and his extended family as he grows into adulthood during the 1930's and 40's. Architecture school in Paris, then Hungary during the war. How the characters' life choices are shaped by their culture and society.

A well-researched book with a very straightforward plot. Fictionalized family history rather than historical fiction, maybe. ( )
  wrk1 | Jan 15, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 98 (next | show all)
"The Invisible Bridge" is a stunning first novel, not just in the manner that Orringer's acclaimed short stories seemed to predict, but in a wholly unexpected fashion. Her short fiction is resolutely contemporary, closely — almost obsessively — observed and firmly situated in the time and place we now inhabit. "The Invisible Bridge," by contrast, is in every admirable sense an "ambitious" historical novel, in which large human emotions — profound love, familial bonds and the deepest of human loyalties — play out against the backdrop of unimaginable cruelty that was the Holocaust.
 
Ms. Orringer’s long, crowded book is its own kind of forest, and not every tree needs to be here; her novel’s dramatic power might have been greatly enhanced by pruning. But Andras’s most enduring wish, it turns out, is to create a kind of family memorial. And Ms. Orringer, writing with both granddaughterly reverence and commanding authority, has done it for him.
added by SimoneA | editNew York Times, Janet Maslin (May 19, 2010)
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Julie Orringerprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kari RisvikTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kjell RisvikTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Information from the Norwegian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
O tempora! O mores! O mekkora nagy córesz.

O the times! O the customs! O what tremendous tsuris.

-from Marsh Marigold,
a Hungarian Labor Service newspaper,
Banhida Labor Camp, 1939


From Bulgaria thick wild cannon pounding rolls
It strikes the mountain ridge, then hesitates and falls
A piled-up blockage of thoughts, animals, cars and men;
whinnying, the road rears up; the sky runs with its mane.
In this chaos of movement you're in me, permanent,
deep in my consciousness you shine, motion forever spent
and mute, like an angel awed by death's great carnival
or an insect in rotted tree pith, staging its funeral.

-Miklós Radnóti, from "Picture Postcards,"
written to his wife during his death march from Heidenau, 1944


It is
as though I lay
under a low
sky and breathed
through a needle's eye.

-W.G. Sebald
from Unrecounted)
Dedication
For the Zahav brothers
First words
Later he would tell her that their story began at the Royal Hungarian Opera House, the night before he left for Paris on the Western Europe Express.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

An unforgettable story of three brothers, of history and love, of marriage tested by disaster, of a Jewish family's struggle against annihilation, and of the dangerous power of art in a time of war.

» see all 5 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 avail.
1165 wanted
3 pay5 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.18)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 12
2.5 2
3 37
3.5 17
4 142
4.5 46
5 126

Audible.com

An edition of this book was published by Audible.com.

See editions

Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 89,422,692 books! | Top bar: Always visible