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klobrien2 Karen O's Reading Extravaganza in 2019!

75 Books Challenge for 2019

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1klobrien2
Edited: Sep 19, 7:38pm Top



Welcome to the first page of my 2019 reading thread!

I've been with the 75-bookers for several years now, and I enjoy so much the camaraderie and book talk that happens here. I'm very glad to join with you all again!

The year 2018 has been another terrific year for reading. I find myself reading pretty much as the spirit leads, although I participate in the Take It or Leave It project and have a great time doing that. I participated in the American Author Challenge, and plan to continue with them (as the spirit leads). A long-term project of mine is to accomplish reads from the "1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die" book, so that may guide my reading a little. What directs my reading more are my friends here on LT, so keep those recommendations coming!

This is my eleventh year participating in the 75 Books Challenge. In 2009, I read 94 books; in 2010, I made it to 148!; 153 in 2011; 160 in 2012; 114 in 2013; 92 in 2014; 109 in 2015; 145 in 2016, 210 in 2017, and a nice round 200 in 2018. I hope to be reading even more in the new year.

Here's a ticker to keep track of my 2019 reads :




Here's a ticker to keep track of my progress with "1001 Books":




Here's where I'll list the books I read, starting with (the number at the end of each line represents the post number where I placed my "review" for the book):

1. Fox 8: A Story by George Saunders - 2
2. The Greatest Love Story Ever Told: An Oral History - 9
3. My First Coding Book by Kiki Prottsman - 10
4. The First and Only Book of Sack: 36 Years of Cartoons for the Star Tribune by Steve Sack - 11
5. Artificial Condition (Murderbot Diaries #2) by Martha Wells - 29
6. The Chosen by Chaim Potok - 30
7. Time's Convert by Deborah Harkness - 37
8. I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff by Abbi Jacobson - 40
9. Less: A Novel by Andrew Sean Greer - 42
10. Beastie Boys Book by Adam Horovitz and Michael Diamond - 43
11. Rogue Protocol (Murderbot Diaries #3) by Martha Wells - 54
12. The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant by Douglass Wallop - 65
13. The Paddington Mystery by John Rhode - 66
14. Miss Julia Speaks Her Mind by Ann B. Ross - 71
15. Gmorning, Gnight!: Little Pep Talks for Me & You by Lin-Manuel Miranda - 72
16. Fables, Vol. 20: Camelot by Bill Willingham - 74
17. Fables, Vol. 21: Happy Ever After by Bill Willingham - 75
18. Fables, Vol. 22: Farewell by Bill Willingham - 76
19. Exit Strategy by Martha Wells - 77
20. Can I Keep Him? by Steven Kellogg - 78
21. Brighton Beach Memoirs by Neil Simon - 79
22. Rich People Problems by Kevin Kwan - 82
23. The Onion's Best News Reporting, Volume 1 by The Onion - 83
24. There There by Tommy Orange - 84
25. Miss Julia Takes Over by Ann B. Ross - 85
26. Citizen Illegal: Poems by Jose Olivarez - 88
27. Fables: Werewolves of the Heartland - 89
28. Bird Box: A Novel by Josh Malerman - 92
29. Fables: 1001 Nights of Snowfall - 94
30. The Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker - 95
31. How to Read a Painting: Lessons from the Old Masters by Patrick de Rynck - 96
32. The Library Book by Susan Orlean - 99
33. The Brothers Lionheart by Astrid Lindgren - 103
34. Sold on a Monday by Kristina McMorris - 107
35. Golden Tresses of the Dead by Alan Bradley - 108
36. Old Filth by Jane Gardam - 109
37. Circe by Madeline Miller - 111
38. The Making of The African Queen by Katharine Hepburn - 112
39. Saga Vol. 7 by Brian K. Vaughan - 115
40. Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens - 116
41. Saga Vol. 8 by Brian K. Vaughan - 118
42. Saga Vol. 9 by Brian K. Vaughan - 119
43. The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai - 120
44. Torchwood: The Encyclopedia by Gary Russell - 122
45. Salvage the Bones by Jessmyn Ward - 123
46. The Mueller Report: The Findings of the Special Counsel Investigation by Robert S. Mueller - 124
47. Miracle Workers: A Novel by Simon Rich - 127
48. Wasted: Tales of GenX Drunk by Mark Gauvreau Judge - 131
49. The Children of Noisy Village by Astrid Lindgren - 132
50. The Department of Sensitive Crimes (Detective Varg #1) by Alexander McCall Smith - 133
51. Emil and the Detectives by Erich Kastner - 134
52. A Simple Favor by Darcey Bell - 137
53. All Systems Red by Martha Wells - 138
54. An American Marriage by Tayari Jones - 139
55. The Celtic World (Great Courses) - 140
56. Asterix the Gaul by Rene Goscinny - 143
57. Heart and Soul: The Story of Florence Nightingale by Gena K. Gorell - 144
58. Fantastic Beasts and Where the Find Them: The Original Screenplay by J. K. Rowling - 145
59. Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald - The Original Screenplay by J. K Rowling - 146
60. Jeeves and the King of Clubs by Ben Schott - 147
61. The Stranger Diaries by Elly Griffiths - 150
62. Torchwood: Rift War by Ian Edgington - 153
63. The Stone Circle by Elly Griffiths - 154
64. Why Don't You Write My Eulogy Now So I Can Correct It?: A Mother's Suggestions by Patricia Marx and Roz Chast - 156
65. Torchwood: Volume 1 World Without End by John Barrowman - 157
66. Asterix Omnibus 1 by Rene Goscinny - 158
67. Why Religion: A Personal Story by Elaine Pagels - 159
68. Things My Son Needs to Know About the World by Fredrik Backman - 160
69. The Mabinogi and Other Medieval Welsh Tales by Patrick C. Ford - 162
70. The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch - 163
71. When the Rain Comes by Alma Fullerton - 164
72. The Art of Bible Translation by Robert Alter - 165
73. Elevation by Stephen King - 167
74. Women Talking by Miriam Toews - 168
75. History of the Ancient World: A Global Perspective by Great Courses - 175
76. Asterix Omnibus 2 by Rene Gisconny - 179
77. Torchwood: First Born by James Goss - 180
78. Torchwood: Risk Assessment by James Goss - 183
79. The Field Guide to Dumb Birds of North America by Matt Kracht - 185
80. American Gods by Neil Gaiman - 186
81. If You're Reading This, It's Too Late by Pseudonymous Bosch - 189
82. Asterix Omnibus 3 by Rene Goscinny - 190
83. Find Momo: A Photography Book by Andrew Knapp - 191
84. Find Momo: Coast to Coast: A Photography Bookby Andrew Knapp - 192
85. By the Fire: Sami Folktales and Legends by Emilie Demant Hall - 193
86. Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett - 194
87. Find Momo Across Europe: Another Hide-and-Seek Photography Book by Andrew Knapp - 196
88. Naamah: A Novel by Sarah Blake - 197
89. Asterix Omnibus 4 by Rene Goscinny - 198
90. Blood Water Paint by Joy McCullough - 199
91. The Art Forger: A Novel by B. A. Shapiro - 201
92. They Called Us Enemy by George Takei - 204
93. Asterix Omnibus 5 by Rene Goscinny - 208
94. Heart Berries: A Memoir by Terese Marie Mailhot - 209
95. Unlikely Friendships: 47 Remarkable Stories From the Animal Kingdom by Jennifer S. Holland - 211
96. Stranger Things: The Other Side (Graphic Novel # 1) by Jody Houser - 212
97. Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend - 213
98. The Second-Worst Restaurant in France: A Paul Stuart Novel (2) by Alexander McCall Smith - 215
99. Unlikely Loves: 43 Heartwarming True Stories from the Animal Kingdom by Jennifer S. Holland - 216
100. Great Courses Art Across the Ages by Ori Z. Soltes - 217
101. Artemisia Gentileschi: The Image of the Female Hero in Italian Baroque Art by Mary D. Garrard - 219
102. Asterix Omnibus 6 by Rene Goscinny - 220
103. The Boys, Vol. 1: The Name of the Game by Garth Ennis - 221
104. Filthy Rich: The Shocking True Story of Jeffrey Epstein by James Patterson - 223
105. Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan - 224
106. The Boys, Vol. 2: Get Some by Garth Ennis - 225
107. Asterix Omnibus 7 by Rene Goscinny - 227
108. The Rosie Result by Graeme Simsion - 228
109. Unlikely Heroes: 37 Inspiring Stories of Courage and Heart from the Animal Kingdom by Jennifer S. Holland - 229
110. Cowboys and Aliens (graphic novel) by Scott Mitchell Rosenberg - 230
111. The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman by Ernest J. Gaines - 231
112. This Book Is Not Good For You by Pseudonymous Bosch - 235
113. King Arthur: History and Legend (Great Courses) by Dorsey Armstrong - 236
114. Asterix Omnibus 8 by Rene Goscinny - 237
115. Looking Back: A Book of Memories by Lois Lowry - 238
116. Mohammed, Charlemagne & the Origins of Europe - 239
117. Unlikely Friendships: Dogs: 37 Stories of Canine Compassion and Courage by Jennifer S. Holland - 241
118. The Boys Omnibus #3 by Garth Ennis - 247
119. Fascism: A Warning by Madeleine Albright - 250

Here is where I'll list the authors selected for the 2018 American Authors Challenge, the books I will read, and if I complete them (here's hoping!)

2019 AAC
January: Chaim Potok - The Chosen - Completed
February: Louisa May Alcott -
March: Jon Clinch -
April: Jesmyn Ward - Salvage the Bones - Completed
May: Jay Parini -
June: Pearl Buck -
July: Founding Fathers (and Mothers) -
August: Ernest J. Gaines - The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman - Completed
September: Leslie Marmon Silko - Storyteller - Reading
October: DRAMA
November: W. E. B. DuBois
December: Marilynne Robinson

BONUS/WILD CARD: Genre Fiction

My 2003 "Books Read" list (casually kept, and probably incomplete): http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2003-reading-list.html
My 2004 "Books Read" list (see above caveats: things get better!):
http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2004-reading-list.html
My 2005 "Books Read" list (most pathetic list yet): http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2005-reading-list.html
My 2006 "Books Read" list : http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2006-reading-list.htm
My 2007 "Books Read" list : http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2007-reading-list.html
My 2008 "Books Read" list : http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2008-reading-list.html
My 2009 "Books Read" list : http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2009-reading-list.html
My 2010 "Books Read" list : http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2010-reading-list.html

Here is a link to my last thread from 2011: http://www.librarything.com/topic/122919

Here is a link to my last thread from 2012: http://www.librarything.com/topic/138897

Here is a link to my last thread from 2013:
http://www.librarything.com/topic/156012

Here is a link to my thread from 2014: http://www.librarything.com/topic/163564

Here is a link to my thread from 2015: https://www.librarything.com/topic/186139

Here is a link to my thread from 2016: http://www.librarything.com/topic/211096

Here is a link to my last thread from 2017: http://www.librarything.com/topic/268142#

Here is a link to my last thread from 2018: https://www.librarything.com/topic/298557

Good reading to you!

2klobrien2
Edited: Feb 20, 12:07pm Top



1.
Fox 8: A Story by George Saunders



Okay, I just read this toward the end of last year, but I read an ebook version, and I think this is one of those books that need to be read on paper. Wonderful little illustrations throughout that weren't the same in pixels. Besides, such a charming story, well worth a reread.

3klobrien2
Edited: Jan 4, 5:45pm Top

Here's a quick list of the reading that I've got in the works right now (helps me get organized):

The Greatest Love Story Ever Told: An Oral History by Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman
Artificial Condition by Martha Wells
Time's Convert by Deborah Harkness
Old Men at Midnight by Chaim Potok
Astounding by Alec Nevala-Lee
I Might Regret This by Abbi Jacobson
Jeeves and the Wedding Bells by Sebastian Faulks
Beastie Boys Book by Mike D
Less by Andrew Sean Greer
The Paddington Mystery by John Rhode
Becoming by Michelle Obama
Circe by Madeline Miller

4drneutron
Jan 2, 8:38pm Top

Welcome back! Looks like some good ones in the works!

5klobrien2
Edited: Jan 3, 3:38pm Top

Hello, Doctor! Thanks for the welcome!

6PaulCranswick
Jan 3, 4:31am Top



Happy 2019
A year full of books
A year full of friends
A year full of all your wishes realised

I look forward to keeping up with you, Karen, this year.

7BLBera
Jan 3, 8:54am Top

Happy New Year, Karen. It looks lime you have some great reading ahead.

8klobrien2
Edited: Jan 3, 3:49pm Top

How lovely! Great to see you, Paul and Beth! Thank you for stopping by! I've got a ton of threads to catch up, so I'll check in with you both later!

9klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 5:35pm Top



2.
The Greatest Love Story Ever Told: An Oral History by Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman



This very funny "oral history" was a hoot to read. The nature of the thing is a little sloppy but that it my only complaint about it. Very enjoyable read. The paper copy has lots of great large photos of the couple, but the ebook did provide the small historical photos and a photographical record of all of the jigsaw puzzles the couple has assembled (wow!) Very much recommended.

10klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 5:36pm Top



3.
My First Coding Book by Kiki Prottsman



An amazing board book that I came across at the library (ages 5-7, but I liked it too!) It makes the basic concepts of coding so clear and accessible with games that have flaps and wheels. I was sold when it started off with a challenge to be persistent in solving problems and completing tasks. I think I need to get this for my almost 7-year-old grandson!

11FAMeulstee
Jan 3, 5:11pm Top

Glad to see you have started your thread, Karen, happy reading in 2019!
Three books read, good start :-)

13karenmarie
Jan 4, 6:15pm Top

Happy new year and happy new thread, Karen!

I've got Becoming on tap soon, too.

14alcottacre
Jan 4, 6:58pm Top

>2 klobrien2: That one looks good. Thanks for the recommendation, Karen.

Happy New Year!

15klobrien2
Jan 4, 7:29pm Top

Hi, Karen and Stasia! Happy New Year to you both!

Can't wait to get into Becoming--I even splurged on an ebook copy AND I got a paper copy for Christmas, so the best of both worlds. I hate looking at photos on my Nook, so I'll keep the paper book handy for that.

Fox 8 is wonderful, and it is just a story, so doesn't chew up too much reading time. It made me laugh and cry just as much the second time through. I hope you get a chance to read it!

Thanks to you both for visiting! I'm making my way through the 2019 threads, so I'll "see" you soon.

16The_Hibernator
Jan 6, 6:42am Top

Great that you got a hard copy of Becoming so you can look at the pictures. I hate looking at pictures in ebooks too.

17klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 5:37pm Top



Dreadful Young Ladies and Other Stories by Kelly Barnhill



I included this book in my reading total for last year, so I'm not including it in the overall totals this year. I'll leave this part of my "review" here, though.

Excellent set of stories, full of life and a kind of magical realism that I love, and don't hate! Barnhill is one of my favorite authors now (I've previously read The Girl Who Drank the Moon) and she is so good at these short stories.

I always read the author's acknowledgements, and I was especially glad to have done so with this book. I came across this wonderful gem of a quote about reading, and readers, and why we read. Just blew my mind:

It should be noted that I am, always and forever, in a state of awe and gratitude for the facts that there are readers in the world. There is, at its center, something immutably miraculous about the substance and process of reading stories. We read because we hunger to know, to empathize, to feel, to connect, to laugh, to fear, to wonder, and to become, with each page, more than ourselves. To become creatures with souls. We read because it allows us, through force of mind, to hold hands, touch lives, speak as another speaks, listen as another listens, and feel as another feels. We read because we wish to journey forth together. There is, despite everything, a place for empathy and compassion and rumination, and just knowing that fact, for me, is an occasion for joy. That we still, in this frenetic and bombastic and self-centered age, have legions of people who can and do return to the quietness of the page, opening their minds and hearts, again and again, to the wild world and the stuff of life, pinned into scenes and characters and sharp images and pretty sentences--well. It sure feels like a miracle, doesn't it? I that you, readers, and I salute you. With an open heart and a curious mind, I, too, return to the page. Let us hold hands and journey forth.

18alcottacre
Jan 6, 9:29am Top

>5 klobrien2: Another BB for me! Your thread is dangerous!

19klobrien2
Jan 6, 9:37am Top

I'm glad to be of service! :)

20Cait86
Jan 6, 12:51pm Top

>17 klobrien2: Great title for a book, and beautiful quotation from the acknowledgements! Looking forward to following your reading this year :)

21katiekrug
Jan 6, 5:51pm Top

Happy (belated) new year, Karen! I've dropped my star and will try to lurk less and comment more :)

I am saving the audio of the Offerman/Mullally book for a road trip with my husband, as he has become a huge Offerman fan after finally watching Park and Rec.

22humouress
Jan 6, 9:58pm Top

Happy belated New Year Karen! And happy new thread!



Wishing you and your family the best for 2019.

>10 klobrien2: That looks like one I need for myself. ;0)

23harrygbutler
Jan 7, 12:43pm Top

A belated happy new year, Karen! Wishing you lots of good reading!

24klobrien2
Jan 9, 6:32pm Top

Thank you, sir! And the same to you!

25klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 5:38pm Top

I recently watched "Guys and Dolls" and wanted to read the source material, the New York stories of Damon Runyon, specifically the story, "The Idyll of Miss Sarah Brown."



Guys and Dolls and Other Writings by Damon Runyon



I dipped into other places of the book, an intro by Pete Hamill, an essay and annotations for the stories. I'd love to get more into this book right now, but the writing style is so intense and luscious, it would take some serious time and commitment. I just love authors who play with words and dialogue so to create almost a new language.

I thoroughly enjoyed both the movie and the short story!

26msf59
Jan 9, 6:43pm Top

Happy New Year, Karen. Happy New Thread. Wishing you a great reading year for 2019.

I have really been into story collections, these past couple of years, so you got my attention with Dreadful Young Ladies and Other Stories. I had not heard of it.

27klobrien2
Jan 9, 6:49pm Top

My husband and I are watching the entire catalog of Doctor Who television episodes, and are making great progress. We started back in 2012 with the First Doctor (he-who-must-not-be-named), and recently completed the 1st series of the "modern era Doctor Who" (Christopher Eccleston). Next up is the Tenth Doctor, David Tennant. It's been so enjoyable and interesting to see the evolution of the show through the years.

Just for the heck of it, I re-watched the very first set of episodes today ("Unearthly Child," from 1963). They are SO Slow-moving, and this was my second viewing, so I felt no compunction about watching them mostly on fast-forward (slowing down for good dialogue parts). The closed captioning shows up on fast-forward, too!

An extra treat was a set of comedy sketches about the early shows which made a lot more sense after watching all of them. Very funny!

28klobrien2
Jan 9, 6:51pm Top

>26 msf59: Hi Mark! I really enjoyed Dreadful Young Ladies and I hope you get a chance to read it. I think you would like it!

Thanks for stopping by!

29klobrien2
Edited: Apr 19, 5:20pm Top



5.
Artificial Condition (Murderbot Diaries #2) by Martha Wells



Gosh, I love these little "Murderbot" books! They're so much about what it means to be human, to be brave, to be a warrior for good.

30klobrien2
Edited: Apr 19, 5:22pm Top



6.
The Chosen by Chaim Potok



This was one of my favorite books when I was a teenager, and the rereading really held up. I love this book, and Potok remains one of my favorite authors. He is so good at describing the places in the book, the cultures, the relationships.

31katiekrug
Jan 10, 8:11pm Top

Yay for two good ones in a row!

32harrygbutler
Jan 11, 10:02pm Top

>25 klobrien2: Hi, Karen! Runyon is so important to mid-century popular culture. I think I've read a story or two, but don't recall which ones — and may be remembering movie versions instead. :-) I'll keep my eye out for that collection.

33thornton37814
Jan 12, 12:00pm Top

>30 klobrien2: That was such a great book!

34klobrien2
Jan 14, 8:52pm Top

Wow, three messages from three different people! Very nice to see all three of you here!

>30 klobrien2: The Chosen was one of my favorites in my youth, and I was glad to see that I still love it in my "oldth." And the Murderbot Diaries books are so much fun--I just got the third one in a library ebook. I think I'll have to read more by the author, Martha Wells.

>32 harrygbutler: I didn't know that Runyon was a journalist (among other things). I think I need to get a copy of that collection for myself, to slowly go though and savor each bit.

Thank you all for visiting and stopping to chat!

35souloftherose
Jan 15, 1:23pm Top

Yay for Murderbot!

>30 klobrien2: I've had The Chosen on my wishlist since alcottacre recommended it when I first joined the group, um, 10 years ago(!) Guess, I should really get round to getting hold of a copy!

36klobrien2
Jan 16, 12:52pm Top

>35 souloftherose: Yes! SecUnit forever!

Thanks for stopping by--good reading to you!

37klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 5:44pm Top



7.
Time's Convert by Deborah Harkness



After waiting for what seemed to be forever for a new book from the author, it has taken me so long to get this read. I even had my own copy! Maybe that's the problem, because my attention had to be on the books I had out from the library.

Harkness is a historian, the focus of this book (other than the love story between a vampire and his beloved) was American history (during the Revolution, and thereafter). Loved it!

38jnwelch
Jan 16, 4:31pm Top

Hiya, Karen.

I'm glad the Murderbot book and The Chosen both ranked highly for you. I loved both of those.

39klobrien2
Jan 17, 7:15pm Top

Hi, Joe! I loved both of those books, though I tend to rate the books I read highly. If I didn't like a book, I probably wouldn't finish it. I can usually find at least one reason to like a book and rate it highly. Maybe it's "Minnesota Nice."

Thanks for stopping by!

40klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 5:48pm Top



8.
I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff by Abbi Jacobson



I really like the TV show "Broad City," now nearing its fifth and final year. Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer created this show, and it is smart, and a real hoot.

This book was a good read. Its framework is a three-week trip that the author took from NYC to the West Coast, but she tells us about her whole life. Very funny, very smart, lots to think about. The book gets bogged down about halfway through IMHO; I think the author was challenged to pump up the pages and the essay on the various ways she could meet her ex by accident and what that would be like--left me bored and annoyed. But it was quite easy to skim that and be done.

41klobrien2
Edited: Jan 17, 7:33pm Top

Currently reading

Beastie Boys Book by Adam Horovitz + Michael Diamond (2/3 done; really enjoying it)
Less: A Novel by Andrew Sean Greer (1/2 done; really great--these first two vie for my attention!) TIOLI shared read!
Becoming by Michelle Obama (just started; want to be reading this!) TIOLI shared read!
Circe by Madeline Miller (Last year, I made good progress; now, it's been so long that I'll want to start over) TIOLI shared read!
Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells (Third novella in the "Murderbot Diaries"--very hard to resist!)
Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald (might pass on this one?)
Old Men at Midnight by Chaim Potok (just started; shows promise for me)

I've had these next three so long from the library that it might be a sign to give up on them. I'll keep them around in case I don't have anything else to read (!)

Astounding by Alec Nevala-Lee
Jeeves and the Wedding Bells by Sebastian Faulks
The Paddington Mystery by John Rhode

42klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 5:50pm Top



9.
Less: A Novel by Andrew Sean Greer



Totally loved this! Funny, sad, not-a-word-wasted kind of book. No wonder it won the Pulitzer!

43klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 5:57pm Top



10.
Beastie Boys Book by Adam Horovitz and Michael Diamond



Fun book, full of photos, clever writing, and memorabilia of the time.

44karenmarie
Jan 21, 8:57am Top

Hi Karen!

>25 klobrien2: I love Guys and Dolls and have a different collection of Runyon’ stories: Guys and Dolls: The Stories of Damon Runyon. When my daughter was in HS, she was in the pit band for the school play of Guys and Dolls. I bought the DVD and we watched it before rehearsals started. She loved it.

>27 klobrien2: Bill and I watched the very first episode of Dr. Who some time ago while we were watching David Tenant’s Doctor. Not being die hard fans, we didn’t continue, but I admire your long-term commitment. I did watch quite a bit of the 4th Doctor when I was dating a Dr. Who fanatic. Which doctor do you like best so far?

>41 klobrien2: I’m glad you’re enjoying Less (and >42 klobrien2: finished and loved it.) I have Becoming on my shelves waiting for a lull in my non-fiction commitments, and Circe is scheduled for my RL book club’s June discussion.

45lyzard
Jan 21, 3:24pm Top

>41 klobrien2:

Hi, Karen! I was delighted finally to get my hands on The Paddington Mystery after it being MIA for so many decades. As often happens, as a first book in a series it's quite different from much of what followed, but it's a good introduction to Dr Priestley.

46klobrien2
Jan 23, 6:35pm Top

>44 karenmarie: Hiya back, Karen!

The "Guys and Dolls" movie was terrific -- great casting, and who knew? Marlon Brando could sing and dance? The little of the Runyon that I did read, I really liked. It almost reads as poetry sometimes, I think. In any case, it has a real music to it.

We're on David Tennant now--just started his series. The "modern" doctors are So different from the older players, it's like apples and oranges. I liked Sylvester McCoy, but he was kind of a dark character, kind of preamble to the modern doctors. I really liked Christopher Eccleston, and I'm really liking David Tennant.

I think Jodie Whittacker is doing a wonderful job as the first female doctor. I sure hope they give her more time as the Doctor.

I did really enjoy Less and I'd definitely consider it for a reread. There was so much to like about it--so many themes and so much humor (and sadness). I'm not going to finish Becoming this month, but I want to take my time with it, so that's okay. And I have two copies of it of my very own--paper and ebook--so I don't have to wait for the library.

Thanks so much for stopping by and chatting! I read your thread all the time (you're one of those that is hard to keep up with!)

47klobrien2
Jan 23, 6:39pm Top

>45 lyzard: Hi, Liz! Great to see you here!

I had a little difficulty getting started with The Paddington Mystery--this is my first John Rhode--but I think I'm over the hump now and sailing along. Dr Priestly is quite the character, isn't he? I'm not sure that I like him very much at this point. He seems a bit like Poirot, with a strong sense of self, I might say. I'm going to buzz over to Fictfact, however, and enter this new series, because I'm sure I'll want to read more. I guess that's a positive sign!

Thanks for stopping by!

48klobrien2
Jan 23, 6:44pm Top

So, what have I been doing?...I've been a real fan of Deborah Harkness and her "All Souls" trilogy; then I recently read her new book Time's Convert, which is part of that world, but continuing on with the younger generation. Loved 'em all.

They had made a television series out of the first book, Discovery of Witches and I found it! AMC Ad-free has the series, and for a mere $4.99 I was able to get a month's access. Which is funny, because I watched them all in one day! Luckily, it was a day I was not scheduled to work, and had no other commitments! Yay!

I really liked the show; there were some changes from the book, but I liked most of the changes, thought they made the story flow better. I am a fan!

49klobrien2
Edited: Jan 24, 8:35pm Top

Currently reading, in this order of priority:

Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells (Third novella in the "Murderbot Diaries"--very hard to resist!) Really close to winding this up! Only one more book in the series (Wah!)
The Paddington Mystery by John Rhode -- got a bump up in the rotation
Astounding by Alec Nevala-Lee -- bumping this one up
Jeeves and the Wedding Bells by Sebastian Faulks - this one moves up, too
The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant by Douglass Wallop (because of "Damn Yankees"}
Gmorning! GNight: Little Pep Talks for Me & You by Lin-Manuel Miranda

Becoming by Michelle Obama (just started; want to be reading this!) won't finish this month, but I want to be taking my time with it, so that's okay
Circe by Madeline Miller (Last year, I made good progress; now, it's been so long that I'll want to start over)
Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald (might pass on this one?)
Old Men at Midnight by Chaim Potok (just started; shows promise for me)

Have to find a Louisa May Alcott book to read for the February AAC. I've read a few already (Little Women, Hospital Sketches). I'll be doing some research on this!

50harrygbutler
Jan 23, 7:55pm Top

>47 klobrien2: Hi, Karen! I found The Paddington Mystery a bit weak, but entertaining, when I read it last year, and I'll be reading others in the series, too. I've read and enjoyed books by Rhode published under the Miles Burton pseudonym, including the rather odd The Secret of High Eldersham.

51lyzard
Jan 23, 10:09pm Top

>47 klobrien2:

Don't expect him to soften down to cuddliness: if anything he gets---hmm, I believe Rhode's word-of-choice is "irascible"! :)

>50 harrygbutler:

I wish they'd start resurrecting some of those!

52karenmarie
Jan 24, 10:00am Top

>49 klobrien2: Damn Yankees is another one of my favorite movies of all time. Gwen Verdon, Ray Walston, Tab Hunter, Jean Stapleton… I've watched it dozens of times. I’ve also shared that one with my daughter. I know all the songs but didn’t realize until I was an adult that Bob Fosse is her dance partner in ‘Who’s got the Pain’.

53klobrien2
Edited: Jan 24, 6:35pm Top

>52 karenmarie: Yay! I found the movie just wonderful (even a few confusing moments--like the musical number you mentioned--what the heck was that about?) From the get go, I was thinking, "Boy, this is quite modern and well-written! Wonderful acting, singing, and dancing!" The baseball element lured my husband into watching! We both really liked the movie, and I am really liking the The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant book.

I must continue with my old movies/musical watching. My education there has been lacking!

I'm glad that you like the movie so much--it's just a gem, isn't it?!

54klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 5:58pm Top



11.
Rogue Protocol (Murderbot Diaries #3) by Martha Wells



Loved, loved, loved. I've got the fourth and last book, Exit Strategy cued up (ha!) They read so fast, and they're like brain candy, with an exciting plot, an amazing and likable hero, and lots to think about.

The books remind me quite a bit of the "Bobiverse" books by Dennis E. Taylor: there is a non-human, sentient hero who is able to use feeds and drones and hacking to accomplish its deeds. I really liked those books, too!

55klobrien2
Edited: Jan 24, 9:14pm Top

Currently reading, in this order of priority:

Finish up in January?

The Paddington Mystery by John Rhode
The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant by Douglass Wallop (because of "Damn Yankees")
Exit Strategy by Martha Wells (because it's the last book of "Murderbot Diaries" (sob!))

Reading for February and thereafter:

The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan (Participating in the group read of the "Wheel of Time" books) This one is a chunkster!
Miss Julia Speaks Her Mind (Starting on the "Miss Julia" series because Karenmarie gave me a BB!)
Astounding by Alec Nevala-Lee
Jeeves and the Wedding Bells by Sebastian Faulks
Gmorning! GNight: Little Pep Talks for Me & You by Lin-Manuel Miranda
Rich People Problems by Kevin Kwan (coming soon to me on ebook)
There, There by Tommy Orange
Fables 20: Camelot
Fables 21: Happily Ever After
Fables 22: Farewell

Becoming by Michelle Obama (just started; want to be reading this!) won't finish this month, but I want to be taking my time with it, so that's okay
Circe by Madeline Miller (Last year, I made good progress; now, it's been so long that I'll want to start over)
Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald (might pass on this one?)
Old Men at Midnight by Chaim Potok (just started; shows promise for me)

My Louisa May Alcott book to read for the February AAC: A Double Life: Newly Discovered Thrillers (a TBR item for me!)

56klobrien2
Jan 24, 8:52pm Top

I took in the first 2 of 6 episodes of "Derry Girls," a Netflix original, and it's a good one. Kind of a coming-of-age/whacky family/friends forever show, charming, and funny. Someone on LT recommended it (who was it? A big "thank you" to whomever it was but I can't remember).

57jnwelch
Jan 24, 8:54pm Top

I so agree on the Murderbot series! They read so fast, and they're like brain candy, with an exciting plot, an amazing and likable hero, and lots to think about. Yes!

58klobrien2
Jan 24, 8:55pm Top

We are also starting up a great watch of the "Red Green Show," starting back with the first season from 1991 (a LONG time ago). We're almost through the first season, which we've had to get through ILL (thank the powers-that-be for ILL!) I really like the shows, but I hope a few things change (the viewer hears a chainsaw constantly running during most of the show; I know why they did it, but it gets annoying).

59klobrien2
Jan 24, 8:56pm Top

>57 jnwelch: I'm thinking that they would make a great TV show/movie...what do you think? I would go see that movie!

60katiekrug
Jan 25, 10:13am Top

>56 klobrien2: - I am loving Derry Girls, too! I heard about it from Nora. I've watched the first 3 episodes and laughed out loud several times during all 3.

61klobrien2
Jan 25, 3:26pm Top

>60 katiekrug: I'm sure that's where I read of it then--on your thread! It IS laugh-out-loud funny, isn't it?! Thank you for the heads-up! And thanks for visiting here!

62humouress
Edited: Jan 25, 11:23pm Top

>47 klobrien2: >51 lyzard: Every time I see the title Paddington Mystery I think of the bear from Darkest Peru. :0) Now, he is cuddly.

>48 klobrien2: I haven't read the books, but I did catch the first episode of the TV show. I must say the vampire (sorry, I forget his name) has been cast/ made up well. He's quite subtly creepy. But I saw a trailer where he hunts down and takes blood from a stag and I don't think I want to continue watching. :0/

63jnwelch
Jan 26, 7:42pm Top

>59 klobrien2: I'd watch a Murderbot movie or tv series in a blink, Kathy. I hope some producer picks on that idea.

64klobrien2
Jan 27, 9:06am Top

>62 humouress: I know, I think of Paddington Bear every time in conjunction with that book!

Yes, I agree, those scenes are hard to take. There aren't very many of them, thank goodness. The vampire, Matthew, is played by Matthew Goode (Lady Mary's husband in Downton Abbey). He really is good in the role. I have no quibbles with any of the casting.

Thanks for stopping by!

>63 jnwelch: Fingers crossed! (well, not really, it would be really hard to type that way! hardeharhar!)

65klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 6:05pm Top



12.
The Year the Yankees Lost the Pennant by Douglass Wallop



Excellent, fun read! This book was the basis of "Damn Yankees," a movie I recently watched and loved.

66klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 6:05pm Top



13.
The Paddington Mystery by John Rhode



First in the "Dr Priestly" mysteries. A little dated and slow-moving, but a pleasant read. I've been told that the first book is quite different from the rest of the series, so I might give the second book a look.

67lyzard
Jan 28, 3:01pm Top

>66 klobrien2:

Just FYI, I would say that it wasn't until the third one, The Ellerby Case, that John Rhode got into his groove. :)

68klobrien2
Jan 28, 8:33pm Top

Okay, that's good to know! The completest in me will make me stick with the first and second until I get to the third! Thanks for the info!

69humouress
Edited: Jan 30, 3:45am Top

>64 klobrien2: Was he? I didn't spot that; but then, he was only around towards the end of the run.

ETA: just spotted your surreal ticker, with a shark swimming over grass towards a flower.

70klobrien2
Feb 3, 9:09am Top

>69 humouress: I didn't spot him either, but if it was just a little cameo appearance...I might try to Google more info. "Inquiring minds want to know" and all that.

You liked the ticker! I keep reusing the same one every year. It makes me smile to see it, hope you liked it!

And thanks for visiting!

71klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 6:05pm Top



14.
Miss Julia Speaks Her Mind by Ann B. Ross



I read this due to a "book bullet" from KarenMarie--thanks for the "heads up." I enjoyed the read and felt the urge to keep reading to see what happened next. I LOVE that feeling.

I'm giving the read only three-and-a-half stars because it dragged a little and some of the characters and action seemed a little unbelievable. I will definitely give the second book in the series a read, though!

72klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 6:04pm Top



15.
Gmorning, Gnight!: Little Pep Talks for Me & You by Lin-Manuel Miranda



Charming little gem of a collection of tiny poems/thoughts with lots of lovely drawings. Inspirational and lovely!

73klobrien2
Edited: Feb 3, 3:58pm Top

Currently reading, in this order of priority:

Reading for February and thereafter:

The Eye of the World by Robert Jordan (Participating in the group read of the "Wheel of Time" books) This one is a chunkster!
Rich People Problems by Kevin Kwan (ebook) Really enjoyed this series!
There, There by Tommy Orange (coming to me soon on ebook)
Fables 20: Camelot
Fables 21: Happily Ever After
Fables 22: Farewell

My Louisa May Alcott book to read for the February AAC: A Double Life: Newly Discovered Thrillers (a TBR item for me!)

Recently added:

If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face? by Alan Alda
Miss Julia Takes Over by Ann B. Ross (second in the series)
Brighton Beach Memoirs by Neil Simon (TIOLI)
The Onion's Finest News Reporting, Vol 1 by The Onion (TIOLI)
Darker Shade of Magic by V. E. Schwab
The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson (TIOLI)

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little):

Becoming by Michelle Obama (just started; want to be reading this!) won't finish this month, but I want to be taking my time with it, so that's okay
Circe by Madeline Miller (Last year, I made good progress; now, it's been so long that I'll want to start over)
Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Old Men at Midnight by Chaim Potok (just started; shows promise for me)

74klobrien2
Edited: Apr 19, 5:24pm Top



16.
Fables, Vol. 20: Camelot by Bill Willingham



Nearing the end of the "Fables" series, and I'm so sad about it. Good to know that rereads are eminently doable.

75klobrien2
Edited: Feb 6, 6:07pm Top

76klobrien2
Edited: Feb 7, 1:54pm Top

77klobrien2
Edited: Apr 19, 5:26pm Top



19.
Exit Strategy: The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells



Tada! Another Murderbot Diary done. I think there is another in the works? Yes! Coming in May of 2020!

78klobrien2
Edited: Apr 19, 5:27pm Top



20.
Can I Keep Him? by Steven Kellogg



Sweet little kiddo book, about a little kiddo who loves animals and wants to have them with him always, but the answer is always...no. Until one day,...

79klobrien2
Edited: Feb 28, 9:49pm Top

80karenmarie
Feb 14, 8:22am Top

Hi Karen!

>46 klobrien2: I’ve really enjoyed spending more time on LT since I retired – every day, in fact – glad you come over for visits.

>71 klobrien2: Yay for Miss Julia Speaks Her Mind. I don't remember it dragging on, but I do remember feeling like I wanted to step right into the book and tell her to watch out for those nasty people who were after her money!

You’re really getting a lot of good reading! Congrats.

81klobrien2
Feb 20, 12:06pm Top

Hi Karen! Glad to see you here! I'm making my rounds, so I'll visit your thread for sure later...

82klobrien2
Edited: Feb 28, 9:50pm Top

84klobrien2
Edited: Mar 28, 8:58pm Top



24.
There There by Tommy Orange

85klobrien2
Edited: Mar 28, 9:04pm Top

86karenmarie
Mar 2, 8:21am Top

Hi Karen!

I'll be interested to see how you like Miss Julia #2. I don't have it on my shelves, otherwise I think I'd have gone right into it after finishing #1.

87klobrien2
Mar 2, 12:42pm Top

>86 karenmarie: Sorry, Karen, I'm behind in even the quick little reports that I've been doing.

I liked Miss Julia Takes Over just fine, for what it is. A fun read, although I get impatient with the characters and the relentless "Southern ways" sometimes. This book was funny, sweet, hopeful, and I love the Miss Julia character. I'll certainly continue on with the series, courtesy of the library.

Thanks for stopping by!

88klobrien2
Edited: Mar 28, 9:06pm Top



26.
Citizen Illegal by Jose Olivarez



Excellent little book of poems, published under the BreakBeat Poets mark.

There is a set of poems entitled, "Mexican Heaven," that I just loved. They're funny, they're sad, they're angry. Here's the one that someone posted, that got me to read this book in the first place:

Mexican Heaven

there are white people in heaven, too.
they build condos across the street
& ask the Mexicans to speak English.
i'm just kidding.
there are no white people in heaven.

89klobrien2
Edited: Mar 28, 9:08pm Top

90jnwelch
Mar 5, 6:46pm Top

Oh good, Kathy. I loved Citizen Illegal, too. It was my #1 for poetry in ‘18.

91klobrien2
Mar 7, 2:19pm Top

Oh, I'm sure that's where I read the rave review! Thank you for that! When I see "BreakBeat Poets," I know that I need to read.

I'm making the rounds of the threads, so I'll check in at your thread, for sure. Thanks for stopping by!

92klobrien2
Edited: Mar 28, 9:09pm Top



28.
Bird Box: A Novel by Josh Malerman



Amazing (and scary) dystopian novel.

93klobrien2
Edited: Mar 7, 9:12pm Top

Reading for March and thereafter:

Golden Tresses of the Dead by Alan Bradley (TIOLI shared read #5)
Becoming by Michelle Obama (the time has definitely come for me to get this read! It's a TIOLI shared read #8!)
Old Filth by Jane Gardam (TIOLI shared read #8)
Silence of the Girls by Pat Barker (TIOLI shared read #9)
Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear (TIOLI shared read #11)
Good and Mad by Rebecca Traister (TIOLI shared read #4, if I can get hold of a copy)

Sold on a Monday by Kristina McMorris
A Darker Shade of Magic by V. E. Schwab
The Library Book by Susan Orlean
If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face? by Alan Alda

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little):

Circe by Madeline Miller (Last year, I made good progress; now, it's been so long that I'll want to start over)

Then, there are a bunch of library books that have accumulated, which I should either decide to get serious about or return:

Miss Julia Throws a Wedding (#3 in the series) by Ann B. Ross
We are Displaced by Malala Yousafzai (this is a very recent add)
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman
Us Against You by Fredrik Backman (brand-new add)
The Making of the African Queen by Katharine Hepburn
Peter and Max: A Fables Novel by Bill Willingham
Fables: 1001 Nights of Snowfall by Bill Willingham
Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach
Go, Went, Gone by Jenny Erpenbeck
How to Read a Painting: Lessons from the Old Masters by Patrick de Rynck
Rigged for Murder (the Windjammer Mystery Series) by Jenifer LeClair

As you can see, I'm in big piles of books! I'll hope to get organized this weekend, safe and sound inside as the threatened snowstorm covers Minnesota with yet more snow!

94klobrien2
Edited: Mar 28, 9:10pm Top



29.
Fables: 1001 Nights of Snowfall by Bill Willingham



Lovely and fascinating take on Scheherazade and the 1001 Nights. I'm rapidly running out of "Fables" to read. I think I will be looking into more things by Bill Willingham.

95klobrien2
Edited: Mar 28, 9:12pm Top

97humouress
Mar 16, 3:14pm Top

98klobrien2
Mar 19, 7:00pm Top

>97 humouress: Hi! Thanks for stopping by!

99klobrien2
Edited: Apr 19, 5:29pm Top



32.
The Library Book by Susan Orlean



Loved it! Definitely a 5-star read for me.

100jnwelch
Edited: Mar 22, 7:25pm Top

>99 klobrien2: Five stars, okay, you got me, Karen. I've been seeing nothing but positive comments about The Library Book. Adding it to the WL.

101klobrien2
Mar 21, 11:32am Top

>100 jnwelch: It's a winner, John. With a little bit of everything--history, drama, librarianship, characters,...It's like a love poem to libraries.

102klobrien2
Edited: Mar 28, 9:23pm Top



33.
The Brothers Lionheart by Astrid Lindgren


103FAMeulstee
Mar 21, 7:06pm Top

>102 klobrien2: Oh, Karen, that was one of my favorites when I was young.
There was also a very good movie adaption made in 1977.

104klobrien2
Edited: Mar 28, 9:23pm Top

>103 FAMeulstee: Hi! I'm sure I read about The Brothers Lionheart on your thread (I'll have to go back and look). I never knew that Lindgren had written other than the Pippi books. I'll have to look for the movie (there certainly are a lot of thrills and chills).

Thanks for stopping by!

105FAMeulstee
Mar 21, 7:44pm Top

>104 klobrien2: Another good one by Lindgren is Ronia, the Robber's Daughter.

106klobrien2
Mar 21, 8:50pm Top

Reading that I really want to finish in March:

Golden Tresses of the Dead by Alan Bradley (TIOLI shared read #5)
Old Filth by Jane Gardam (TIOLI shared read #8)
Karen Memory by Elizabeth Bear (TIOLI shared read #11)
Good and Mad by Rebecca Traister (TIOLI shared read #4, just got a library copy)

Sold on a Monday by Kristina McMorris (my TIOLI #1 read--I always try to read for challenge #1)

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little):

Circe by Madeline Miller (Restarting my read, and I have an ebook copy!)
Becoming by Michelle Obama (I have no excuse for not reading this, because I have a paper copy, and an ebook that I bought! Maybe that's the problem--I don't have a library keeping tabs on me)

Then, there are a bunch of library books that have accumulated, which I should either decide to get serious about or return:

Miss Julia Throws a Wedding (#3 in the series) by Ann B. Ross
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman
The Making of the African Queen by Katharine Hepburn
Bookends: Collected Intros and Outros by Michael Chabon (what a cool concept!)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright
Mortal Engines by Philip Reeve
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch (recommended by young library patron)
My Sister the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite (others on LT have warbled about this one, and it sounds intriguing)

107klobrien2
Edited: Mar 28, 9:25pm Top



34.
Sold on a Monday: A Novel by Kristina McMorris


108klobrien2
Edited: Mar 28, 9:26pm Top

109klobrien2
Edited: Mar 28, 9:28pm Top



36.
Old Filth by Jane Gardam


110klobrien2
Edited: Mar 25, 9:58pm Top

Karen's current reading:

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little):

Circe by Madeline Miller (Restarting my read, and I have an ebook copy!)
Becoming by Michelle Obama (I have no excuse for not reading this, because I have a paper copy, and an ebook that I bought! Maybe that's the problem--I don't have a library keeping tabs on me)

I might next concentrate on a few shorter, "fun" books that I have from the library:

The Making of the African Queen by Katharine Hepburn
Bookends: Collected Intros and Outros by Michael Chabon (what a cool concept!)
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch (recommended by young library patron)
My Sister the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite (others on LT have warbled about this one, and it sounds intriguing)

Then, there are a bunch of library books that have accumulated, which I should either decide to get serious about or return:

In Pieces by Sally Field (just got this from the library, been waiting forever!)
The Island at the Center of the World by Russell Shorto
Why Religion by Elaine Pagels
Miss Julia Throws a Wedding (#3 in the series) by Ann B. Ross
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman (got the library ebook!)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright
Mortal Engines by Philip Reeve

111klobrien2
Edited: Apr 3, 1:11pm Top



37.
Circe by Madeline Miller


112klobrien2
Edited: Apr 8, 3:23pm Top

113PaulCranswick
Apr 7, 7:11am Top

Wishing you a lovely weekend, Karen.

114klobrien2
Apr 8, 3:21pm Top

Thanks, Paul! Hope yours was fine, too!

115klobrien2
Edited: Apr 11, 2:40pm Top



39.
Saga, Volume 7 by Brian K. Vaughan

116klobrien2
Apr 11, 2:40pm Top

117klobrien2
Edited: Apr 11, 2:50pm Top

Karen's current reading (time for an update!):

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little): Becoming by Michelle Obama

I might next concentrate on a few shorter, "fun" books that I have from the library:

Bookends: Collected Intros and Outros by Michael Chabon (what a cool concept!)
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch (recommended by young library patron)
Saga Volume 8
Saga Volume 9
Elevation by Steven King
Miracle Workers by Simon Rich

Then, there are a bunch of library books that have accumulated, which I should either decide to get serious about or return:

The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai
Salvage the Bones by Jessmyn Ward (AAC this month)
Washington Black by Esi Edugyan
Emily of New Moon by L. M. Montgomery
Miss Julia Throws a Wedding (#3 in the series) by Ann B. Ross

Then, poor, lonesome non-fiction books, which I usually love reading, but feel the need to read fiction right now, I guess. I will get to these sometime:

The Island at the Center of the World by Russell Shorto
Why Religion by Elaine Pagels
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman (got the library ebook!)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright

118klobrien2
Edited: Jun 13, 9:17pm Top



41.
Saga Vol 8 by Brian K. Vaughan

119klobrien2
Edited: Jun 13, 9:19pm Top



42.
Saga Vol 9 by Brian K. Vaughan

120klobrien2
Edited: Jun 13, 9:20pm Top



43.
The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai

121klobrien2
Apr 18, 9:36pm Top

Karen's current reading (time for an update!):

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little): Becoming by Michelle Obama

I might next concentrate on a few shorter, "fun" books that I have from the library:

Bookends: Collected Intros and Outros by Michael Chabon (what a cool concept!)
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch (recommended by young library patron)
Elevation by Steven King
Miracle Workers by Simon Rich

Then, there are a bunch of library books that have accumulated, which I should either decide to get serious about or return:

Salvage the Bones by Jessmyn Ward (AAC this month)
Washington Black by Esi Edugyan
Emily of New Moon by L. M. Montgomery
Miss Julia Throws a Wedding (#3 in the series) by Ann B. Ross
Wasted: Tales of a GenX Drunk by Mark Gauvreau Judge (Justice Cavanaugh's buddy)
The Department of Sensitive Crimes by Alexander McCall Smith (Detective Varg #1!)
A Simple Favor by Darcey Bell (book that the movie was based on)

Then, poor, lonesome non-fiction books, which I usually love reading, but feel the need to read fiction right now, I guess. I will get to these sometime:

The Island at the Center of the World by Russell Shorto
Why Religion by Elaine Pagels
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman (got the library ebook!)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright

122klobrien2
Edited: Jun 13, 9:22pm Top

123klobrien2
Edited: Jun 13, 9:26pm Top



45.
Salvage the Bones by Jessmyn Ward

125karenmarie
Apr 28, 7:06am Top

Hi Karen!

I’ve read three by Pagels and would be interested in Why Religion. I will be reading Circe in May for June book club discussion, The Island at the Center of the World is nothing short of fantastic, ditto The Making of the African Queen. Glad you’re comtinuing with Miss Julia, and I also have no excuse for not reading Becoming since it’s on my shelves too. So’s Elevation.

I read and was amazed/devastated by The Great Believers.

I haven’t had the heart to read The Mueller Report yet.

126klobrien2
Apr 28, 1:46pm Top

>125 karenmarie: Hi, Karen! I'm looking forward to Why Religion because it bodes to be a much more personal account than Pagels's other works on religion. "Me, too" on The Great Believers and Making of the African Queen. The Mueller Report is a slog, and so grim in its import, but I felt I need to bear witness, even though I got so angry at all the blacked-out passages.

Thanks for stopping by! I read your thread nearly every day, and love seeing what you're up to!

127klobrien2
Edited: Jun 13, 9:33pm Top

128klobrien2
Edited: May 3, 5:36pm Top

Karen's current reading (5/3 updates):

I'm reading/watching one of the Great Courses: This one is The Great Courses: The Celtic World and I'm really enjoying it. I'm about halfway through.

For this month's AAC: The Last Station by Jay Parini (I've also got the movie version, to watch after I read!)

Books which I should pay attention to before I have to bring back to the library, or they electronically "go away":

An American Marriage (Tayari Jones)
Black Leopard, Red Wolf (Marlon James)
Juliet, Naked (Nick Hornby)

The Department of Sensitive Crimes by Alexander McCall Smith (Detective Varg #1!) - lots of people waiting for this one, no chance of renewal

Wasted: Tales of a GenX Drunk by Mark Gauvreau Judge (have this through ILL and can't renew it)

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little, but I do own these):

Becoming by Michelle Obama
The World of All Souls by Deborah Harkness

I might next concentrate on a few "fun" books that I have from the library:

Bookends: Collected Intros and Outros by Michael Chabon (what a cool concept!)
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch (recommended by young library patron)
Miss Julia Throws a Wedding by Ann B. Ross
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan (new this week)
Forever Amber (Kathleen Winsor) (not sure about this one yet)
A Simple Favor by Darcey Bell (the book that the movie was based on)
Max Schulman's Large Economy Size, 3 Novels in One Volume (Barefoot Boy with Cheek, The Feather Merchants, The Zebra Derby)

Then, poor, lonesome non-fiction books, which I usually love reading, but feel the need to read fiction right now, I guess. I will get to these sometime:

Am I Alone Here? Notes on Living to Read and Reading to Live by Peter Orner
Why Religion by Elaine Pagels
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman (got the library ebook!)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright

129jnwelch
Edited: May 1, 5:30pm Top

Hi, Karen.

Go Saga! I love that series.

Circe was really good, wasn’t it.

Where the Crawdads Sing (which I liked a lot) has climbed all the way to the top of The NY Times bestseller list. It seems like word of mouth has fueled that.

130klobrien2
May 3, 5:21pm Top

Hi, Joe! Love Saga--I'm having withdrawal pains because I can't get my hands on any more. Circe read like poetry, and I just loved getting a new take on the mythological characters. Where the Crawdads Sing was great, too--such a great main character, with a saga-ish feel to the thing.

Thanks for stopping by to chat!

131klobrien2
Edited: Jun 13, 9:34pm Top

132klobrien2
Edited: Jun 13, 9:36pm Top

133klobrien2
Edited: Jun 13, 9:43pm Top

134klobrien2
Edited: Jul 12, 4:23pm Top

135FAMeulstee
May 15, 10:39am Top

>134 klobrien2: Hi Karen, how did you like Emil and the Detectives?

136klobrien2
May 17, 1:09pm Top

Loved it! So classic in its treatment and its respect for its characters. I definitely will check out other books by Kastner!

Thanks for stopping by!

137klobrien2
Edited: Jul 12, 4:25pm Top



52.
A Simple Favor by Darcey Bell

138klobrien2
Edited: Jul 19, 5:51pm Top



53.
All Systems Red by Martha Wells

139klobrien2
Edited: Jul 19, 5:52pm Top

140klobrien2
Edited: Aug 2, 5:33pm Top



55.
The Celtic World by Great Courses

141klobrien2
Edited: May 20, 9:45pm Top

Karen's current reading (5/20 update):

I liked my last Great Course so much, I've got a new one:

Origins of Ancient Civilizations

For this month's AAC: The Last Station by Jay Parini

The Time-Sensitive. Books which I should pay attention to before I have to bring back to the library, or they electronically "go away":

Jeeves and the King of Clubs by Ben Schott
Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother's Will to Survive by Stephanie Land
Elevation by Steven King
The Overstory by Richard Powers
Juliet, Naked by Nick Hornby)
The Long Ships by Frans Gunnar Bengtsson (got this in paper and ebook, but will I actually get it read? I don't know.)

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little, but I do own these):

Becoming by Michelle Obama
The World of All Souls by Deborah Harkness

"For Fun" books that I have from the library:

Heart and Soul: The Story of Florence Nightingale
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch (recommended by young library patron)
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan (new this week)
Max Schulman's Large Economy Size, 3 Novels in One Volume (Barefoot Boy with Cheek, The Feather Merchants, The Zebra Derby)

Poor, lonesome non-fiction books, which I usually love reading, but feel the need to read fiction right now, I guess. I will get to these sometime:

My Life in France by Julia Child
Team of Vipers by Cliff Sims
The Art of Bible Translations by Robert Alter (my hero!)
Am I Alone Here? Notes on Living to Read and Reading to Live by Peter Orner
Why Religion by Elaine Pagels
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman (got the library ebook!)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright

142klobrien2
May 26, 2:48pm Top

So much has changed in my reading list that I need a new one! I removed books from the list, added books, and I'm close to finishing several. Karen's current reading (5/26 update):

Before the end of the month, I plan to finish up:

The Stranger Diaries by Elly Griffiths
Asterix the Gaul by Rene Goscinny
Heart and Soul: The Story of Florence Nightingale by Gena K. Gorrell
Jeeves and the King of Clubs by Ben Schott

I liked my last Great Course (The Celtic World) very much, and it's given me new things to read!

Asterix the Gaul by Rene Goscinny
Asterix Omnibus by Rene Goscinny
Lion of Ireland by Llewellyn Morgan
The Playboy of the Western World by J. M. Synge
The Mabinogi, and Other Medieval Welsh Tales by Patrick K. Ford

For this month's AAC: The Last Station by Jay Parini. Well, I haven't gotten very far, and I'm not feeling the urge to read it...

The Time-Sensitive. Books which I should pay attention to before I have to bring back to the library, or they electronically "go away":

Jeeves and the King of Clubs by Ben Schott
Elevation by Steven King
The Overstory by Richard Powers
The Stone Circle by Elly Griffiths
Juliet, Naked by Nick Hornby)
The Long Ships by Frans G. Bengtsson ("Long Ships" is a very long book, but the few pages I've read are great)

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little, but I do own these):

Becoming by Michelle Obama
The World of All Souls by Deborah Harkness

"For Fun" books that I have from the library:

Heart and Soul: The Story of Florence Nightingale
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch (recommended by young library patron)
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan (new this week)
Max Schulman's Large Economy Size, 3 Novels in One Volume (Barefoot Boy with Cheek, The Feather Merchants, The Zebra Derby)
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them: The Original Screenplay by J. K. Rowling
Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindlewald: The Original Screenplay by J. K. Rowling

Poor, lonesome non-fiction books, which I usually love reading, but feel the need to read fiction right now, I guess. I will get to these sometime:

The Truth About Animals by Lucy Cooke
My Life in France by Julia Child
Team of Vipers by Cliff Sims
Why Religion by Elaine Pagels
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman (got the library ebook!)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright

143klobrien2
Edited: Aug 2, 5:34pm Top



56.
Asterix the Gaul by Rene Goscinny

147klobrien2
Edited: Aug 2, 5:43pm Top

148FAMeulstee
Edited: Jun 6, 9:07am Top

>143 klobrien2: Thank you, Janet Karen, for reading Asterix the Gaul and adding it to the TIOLI challenge. I needed a laugh and Asterix did the job, with a shared read :-)

149klobrien2
Edited: Jun 3, 8:11pm Top

>148 FAMeulstee: Well, I'll accept those thanks but my name is Karen! I'm glad that it gave you a laugh (Asterix is really funny!) I really liked my first taste of him, and I've got another in the works. Maybe I can put it into this month's TIOLI!

Thanks for stopping by!

150klobrien2
Edited: Aug 3, 5:14pm Top



61.
The Stranger Diaries by Elly Griffiths

151FAMeulstee
Jun 6, 9:07am Top

>149 klobrien2: So sorry for mixing you up with Janet *hangs head in shame* My mind was probably wondering elsewhere...
I edited the post.

152klobrien2
Jun 6, 4:14pm Top

Sweet Anita, I know that you have so much on your mind (and heart) right now. I like the name Janet!

153klobrien2
Edited: Aug 3, 5:16pm Top



62.
Rift War (Torchwood) by Ian Edgington

154klobrien2
Edited: Aug 3, 5:17pm Top



63.
The Stone Circle by Elly Griffiths

155klobrien2
Edited: Jun 9, 6:26pm Top

Karen's current reading (6/8 update):

Actively reading:

Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Anger by Rebecca Traister
Things My Son Needs to Know About the World by Fredrik Backmann
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
Why Religion: A Personal Story by Elaine Pagles
The Truth About Animals: Stoned Sloths, Lovelorn Hippos, and other tales from the wild side of wildlife by Lucy Cooke

I liked my last Great Course (The Celtic World) very much, and have started another: History of the Ancient World: A Global Perspective. Forty-eight lectures of half-an-hour apiece (gulp!)

For this month's AAC: The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck

The Time-Sensitive. Books which I should pay attention to before I have to bring back to the library, or they electronically "go away":

White Fragility by Robin Diangelo - I'll read this for racial equity training at my job (public library)
Elevation by Steven King
Juliet, Naked by Nick Hornby
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little, but I do own these):

Becoming by Michelle Obama
The World of All Souls by Deborah Harkness

"For Fun" books that I have from the library:

Max Schulman's Large Economy Size, 3 Novels in One Volume (Barefoot Boy with Cheek, The Feather Merchants, The Zebra Derby)
Greek to Me by Mary Norris
The Art of Bible Translation by my hero, Robert Alter

Poor, lonesome non-fiction books, which I usually love reading, but feel the need to read fiction right now, I guess. I will get to these sometime:

The Mabinogi, and Other Medieval Welsh Tales by Patrick K. Ford
In Pieces by Sally Field
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright

157klobrien2
Edited: Aug 3, 5:20pm Top

158klobrien2
Edited: Aug 3, 5:21pm Top



66.
Asterix Omnibus 1 by Rene Goscinny

159klobrien2
Edited: Aug 3, 5:23pm Top

161klobrien2
Edited: Jun 14, 4:37pm Top

Karen's current reading (6/14 update):

Actively reading:

Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Anger by Rebecca Traister
The Name of This Book is Secret by Pseudonymous Bosch
The Truth About Animals: Stoned Sloths, Lovelorn Hippos, and other tales from the wild side of wildlife by Lucy Cooke

I liked my last Great Course (The Celtic World) very much, and have started another: History of the Ancient World: A Global Perspective. Forty-eight lectures of half-an-hour apiece (gulp!) Just finished Lecture 21 this morning!

For this month's AAC: The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck

The Time-Sensitive. Books which I should pay attention to before I have to bring back to the library, or they electronically "go away":

The Mabinogi, and Other Medieval Welsh Tales by Patrick K. Ford
Women Talking by Miriam Toews
White Fragility by Robin Diangelo - I'll read this for racial equity training at my job (public library)
Elevation by Steven King

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett - new on this list
Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk by Kathleen Rooney - new
The Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell - new
American Gods by Neil Gaiman - new
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty - new
The Art Forger by B. A. Shapiro - new
Faro's Daughter by Georgette Heyer - new
Juliet, Naked by Nick Hornby
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan
Greek to Me by Mary Norris
The Art of Bible Translation by my hero, Robert Alter
In Pieces by Sally Field
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little, but I do own these):

Becoming by Michelle Obama
The World of All Souls by Deborah Harkness
Max Schulman's Large Economy Size, 3 Novels in One Volume (Barefoot Boy with Cheek, The Feather Merchants, The Zebra Derby) - I wanted my own copy, and I'm expecting it in the mail any day...

163klobrien2
Edited: Aug 3, 5:29pm Top

164klobrien2
Edited: Aug 3, 5:31pm Top



71.
When the Rain Comes by Alma Fullerton

165klobrien2
Edited: Jun 18, 8:44pm Top

Karen's current reading (6/17 update):

Actively reading:

Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women's Anger by Rebecca Traister
Greek to Me: Adventures of the Comma Queen by Mary Norris
The Truth About Animals: Stoned Sloths, Lovelorn Hippos, and other tales from the wild side of wildlife by Lucy Cooke

I liked my last Great Course (The Celtic World) very much, and have started another: History of the Ancient World: A Global Perspective. Forty-eight lectures of half-an-hour each; 24 done!

For this month's AAC: The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck

The Time-Sensitive. Books which I should pay attention to before I have to bring them back to the library, or they electronically "go away":

Women Talking by Miriam Toews
White Fragility by Robin Diangelo - I'll read this for racial equity training at my job (public library)
Elevation by Steven King
The Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett
Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk by Kathleen Rooney
American Gods by Neil Gaiman
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Art Forger by B. A. Shapiro
Faro's Daughter by Georgette Heyer
Juliet, Naked by Nick Hornby
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little, but I do own these):

Becoming by Michelle Obama
The World of All Souls by Deborah Harkness
Max Schulman's Large Economy Size, 3 Novels in One Volume (Barefoot Boy with Cheek, The Feather Merchants, The Zebra Derby) - Got my own copy!

166klobrien2
Edited: Aug 3, 5:45pm Top

167klobrien2
Edited: Aug 3, 5:47pm Top



73.
Elevation by Stephen King

168klobrien2
Edited: Aug 3, 5:49pm Top



74.
Women Talking by Miriam Toews

169karenmarie
Jun 22, 6:39pm Top

Hi Karen!

I have finally read Where the Crawdads Sing and am so glad I did. It was fantastic.

You’re reading some wonderful books and so many good ones lined up. I just bought Good Omens after watching the series this week and might start it this week – of course I have way too many books on my shelves, but I only committed to 45 ROOTs this year and have already read 31, so will be self-indulgent and go for the shiny new ones. I also have Becoming on my shelves… Michelle Obama’s face is staring down at me even as I type this.

And you're almost at the magical 75 - good for you!

170klobrien2
Jun 23, 4:22pm Top

>169 karenmarie: I'm so glad that you liked Where the Crawdads Sing! There was so much to like there, so many different reasons to like it.

I'm looking forward to a reread of Good Omens before I watch the series, and I'm really itching to watch the series.

You are doing great with your reading! I was just thrilled to see your response to the William Kent Krueger Cork O'Connor "first book"--I may have to pick up my next book in the series--I think I'm on 4 or 5?

Thanks so much for stopping by!

171klobrien2
Jun 27, 6:30pm Top

Karen's current reading (6/27 update):

Actively reading:

American Gods by Neil Gaiman (reread; in conjunction with watching season 2 of the TV show)(time-sensitive, but I've requested a paper backup; liking it just as much the second time!)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright
The Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell (time-sensitive)
The Truth About Animals: Stoned Sloths, Lovelorn Hippos, and other tales from the wild side of wildlife by Lucy Cooke

I liked my last Great Course (The Celtic World) very much, and have started another: History of the Ancient World: A Global Perspective. Forty-eight lectures of half-an-hour each; 36 done!

For this month's AAC: The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett
Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk by Kathleen Rooney
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Art Forger by B. A. Shapiro
Faro's Daughter by Georgette Heyer
Juliet, Naked by Nick Hornby
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
If You're Reading This, It's Too Late by Pseudonymous Bosch (Book #2)

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little, but I do own these):

Becoming by Michelle Obama
The World of All Souls by Deborah Harkness
Max Schulman's Large Economy Size, 3 Novels in One Volume (Barefoot Boy with Cheek, The Feather Merchants, The Zebra Derby) - Got my own copy!

172klobrien2
Jul 2, 3:30pm Top

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (I thank them!), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly! Karen's current reading (7/2 update):

Actively reading:

American Gods by Neil Gaiman (reread; in conjunction with watching season 2 of the TV show)(time-sensitive, but I've requested a paper backup; liking it just as much the second time! Should finish it in the next few days.)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright
The Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell (time-sensitive)
The Truth About Animals: Stoned Sloths, Lovelorn Hippos, and other tales from the wild side of wildlife by Lucy Cooke
Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett (others waiting)
By the Fire: Sami Folktales and Legends by Emily Demant Hatt (others waiting)

I liked my last Great Course (The Celtic World) very much, and have started another: History of the Ancient World: A Global Perspective. Forty-eight lectures of half-an-hour each; 40 done!

For this month's AAC: Before the Revolution: America's Ancient Past by Daniel Richter

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Art Forger by B. A. Shapiro
Juliet, Naked by Nick Hornby
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
If You're Reading This, It's Too Late by Pseudonymous Bosch (Book #2)
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman
The Island of Sea Women by Lisa See
Asterix Omnibus 2 by Rene Goscinny
Risk Assessment (Torchwood) by James Goss
Torchwood: First Born by James Goss
Boy Erased by Garrard Conley
The Threat by Andrew McCabe

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little, but I do own these):

Becoming by Michelle Obama
The World of All Souls by Deborah Harkness
Max Schulman's Large Economy Size, 3 Novels in One Volume (Barefoot Boy with Cheek, The Feather Merchants, The Zebra Derby) - Got my own copy!

173drneutron
Jul 4, 9:20am Top

Wow, that’s quite a list!

174klobrien2
Edited: Jul 4, 12:08pm Top

>173 drneutron: Yeah, but keep in mind that these are the books that are the most accessible to me at any given point. I just lost a few of the library ebooks because of an upgrade to my library's system. And if a particular book stays on my list too long, I sometimes recognize that I'll never get around to it (lack of interest, I suppose), and I take it off the list.

Thanks for stopping by!

175klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 1:34pm Top

And, I DO finish some books. Today, I finished my Great Courses "History of the Ancient World"! Loved it, can't wait to start another! I lucked out that, although there were no closed captions on the DVDs, the accompanying book was very complete, and the lecturer had a nice Midwestern accent and spoke very well.



75.
History of the Ancient World: A Global Perspective by Great Courses, Gregory S. Aldrete



176FAMeulstee
Jul 4, 3:35pm Top

Congratulations on reaching 75, Karen!

177drneutron
Jul 5, 12:51pm Top

Congrats on 75!

178klobrien2
Jul 5, 2:42pm Top

Thanks, you two! I was pleased to have the Great Courses course be my 75th. Thoroughly enjoyed both the reading part and the viewing portion.

Thanks also for stopping by!

179klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 1:35pm Top



76.
Asterix Omnibus 2 by Rene Gisconny



180klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 1:36pm Top

181humouress
Jul 9, 12:52am Top

Congratulations on 75!

And you remind me that I am partway through reading Emil and the Detectives to my kids for bedtime reading. It's been such a long time since I read the first part that I've forgotten what happens and they've gone ahead and finished it without me.

182klobrien2
Jul 11, 4:31pm Top

Thanks, humouress!

Oh, well, I guess you have some catching up to do to get back in sync with your kids. I really enjoyed the book, and I'd made a mental note to read more by the author. Must get back to that!

Thanks for stopping by!

183klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 5:14pm Top

184klobrien2
Edited: Jul 11, 7:27pm Top

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (I thank them!), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly! Karen's current reading (7/11 update):

Actively reading:

American Gods by Neil Gaiman (reread; in conjunction with watching season 2 of the TV show)(my library ebook "went home" so now I'm reading a paper copy, about 100pp left)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright
The Truth About Animals: Stoned Sloths, Lovelorn Hippos, and other tales from the wild side of wildlife by Lucy Cooke
Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett (bought my own Nook copy!)
By the Fire: Sami Folktales and Legends by Emily Demant Hatt (scored a library ebook after being able to look at the woodcut illustrations in a paper copy!)
If You're Reading This, It's Too Late by Pseudonymous Bosch (Book #2)
Heart Berries: A Memoir by Terese Marie Mailhot (read glowing reviews of this, and awed by it so far)
The Field Guide to Dumb Birds of North America by Matt Kracht (looks like a hoot!)

I finished my 48-lecture "Great Courses" "History of the Ancient World" and just loved it. My current course is another 48-lecture (each lecture 30 minutes), "Art Through the Ages." I'm ten lectures in. Another winner of a course.

For this month's AAC: Before the Revolution: America's Ancient Past by Daniel Richter

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Mohammed, Charlemagne, and the Origins of Europe by Richard Hodges (recommended by my Ancient History course)
Naamah by Sarah Blake (Noah's wife!)
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Art Forger by B. A. Shapiro (recommended by a good friend)
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman
Boy Erased by Garrard Conley
Greek to Me: Adventures of the Comma Queen by Mary Norris

Been on my TBR since the dawn of time (okay, I exaggerate a little, but I do own these):

Becoming by Michelle Obama
The World of All Souls by Deborah Harkness
Max Schulman's Large Economy Size, 3 Novels in One Volume (Barefoot Boy with Cheek, The Feather Merchants, The Zebra Derby) - Got my own copy!

186klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 5:16pm Top



80.
American Gods by Neil Gaiman


187PaulCranswick
Jul 14, 6:10am Top

I missed you passing 75, Karen - congrats.

Have a lovely weekend.

188klobrien2
Jul 16, 1:28pm Top

Thanks, Paul!

189klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 5:18pm Top

190klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 5:20pm Top



82.
Asterix Omnibus #3 by Rene Goscinny


191klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 5:22pm Top

193klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 5:24pm Top

194klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 5:26pm Top



86.
Good Omens by Neil Gaiman


195klobrien2
Edited: Jul 23, 12:54pm Top

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (I thank them!), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly! Karen's current reading (7/23 update):

Actively reading:

Naamah by Sarah Blake (Noah's wife!)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright
Heart Berries: A Memoir by Terese Marie Mailhot (read glowing reviews of this, and awed by it so far)
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan
Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend
White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for People to Talk About Racism by Robin J. DiAngelo

My current "Great Courses" course is another 48-lecture (each lecture 30 minutes), "Art Across the Ages." I'm 22 lectures in. Another winner of a course.

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Mohammed, Charlemagne, and the Origins of Europe by Richard Hodges (recommended by my Ancient History course)
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Art Forger by B. A. Shapiro (recommended by a good friend)
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman
Boy Erased by Garrard Conley
Blood Water Paint by Joy McCullough
The Point of It All by Charles Krauthammer
The Threat by Andrew G. McCabe
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

197klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 5:28pm Top



88.
Naamah: A Novel by Sarah Blake


198klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 5:29pm Top



89.
Asterix Omnibus 4 by Rene Goscinny


199klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 5:30pm Top

I find myself reading, once again, in synchronicity (I love when topics, personages, even just mentions, cross between different books I am reading). I just finished this wonderful gem of a book, about Artemisia Gentileschi, a female painter of the 17th century (how could I never have heard of her?). I'm also reading The Art Forger by B. A. Shapiro, and my Great Courses course is "Art Across the Ages." I feel as if I am immersed in painting talk, and in recollection of strong female characters (having just finished Naamah: A Novel!) Great reading!

8/1 update: "Art Across the Ages" did, indeed, have a bit on Artemisia -- in today's Lecture 27! I've requested a book from the nearby big-city library: Shapiro mentioned the book as an invaluable resource for her (Artemisia Gentileschi: The Image of the Female Hero in Italian Baroque Art by Mary D. Garrard), and I can't wait to get my hands on the book

So, anyway, here's my Book #90:



90.
Blood Water Paint by Joy McCullough



200klobrien2
Edited: Aug 1, 9:10pm Top

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (I thank them!), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly! Karen's current reading (8/1 update):

Actively reading:

Heart Berries: A Memoir by Terese Marie Mailhot (almost done with this awesome, sad book)
The Art Forger by B. A. Shapiro (ooh, it's getting tense! I should finish this shortly)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright (I'm a good ways into this, but haven't made progress lately; very sad)
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan
Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend
White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for People to Talk About Racism by Robin J. DiAngelo
They Called Us Enemy by George Takei!

UPDATE: Added two books for the American Author Challenge, which this month features Ernest J. Gaines: A Lesson Before Dying and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman. Neither are lengthy books and August is a long month, so I bet I can get them read.

My current "Great Courses" course is another 48-lecture (each lecture 30 minutes), "Art Across the Ages." I'm 28 lectures in. Another winner of a course.

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Mohammed, Charlemagne, and the Origins of Europe by Richard Hodges (recommended by my Ancient History course)
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman (I feel like I should read this book but haven't gotten to it yet)
Boy Erased by Garrard Conley
The Point of It All by Charles Krauthammer (my sister recommended; I'll give it a "Nancy Pearl" shot)
The Threat by Andrew G. McCabe
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

201klobrien2
Edited: Aug 4, 5:31pm Top

202PaulCranswick
Aug 5, 1:25am Top

>200 klobrien2: I am trying to avoid having too many active reads as it seems to be keeping me from finishing so many of them. One at a time for me this month.

203klobrien2
Aug 5, 6:47pm Top

>202 PaulCranswick: I like the variety of having multiples going--then I can decide what I feel like reading at any given point. And then I seem to finish up with several at about the same time, which is a thrill. And I love the feeling of cross-referencing (see "synchronicity" post in 199)--it makes me feel a much richer sense of involvement.

That said, if I have a real need to finish a particular book, I will focus on that one to try to make my commitments.

It's all good, though, isn't it?!

Thanks for visiting and for chatting!

204klobrien2
Edited: Aug 5, 6:49pm Top

205klobrien2
Aug 5, 7:02pm Top

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (I thank them!), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly! Karen's current reading (8/5 update):

Actively reading:

Heart Berries: A Memoir by Terese Marie Mailhot (almost done with this awesome, sad book)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright (I'm a good ways into this, but haven't made progress lately; very sad)
The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper by Hallie Rubenhold (new)
The Second Worst Restaurant in France by Alexander McCall Smith (new)
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan
Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend
White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for People to Talk About Racism by Robin J. DiAngelo

UPDATE: Added two books for the American Author Challenge, which this month features Ernest J. Gaines: A Lesson Before Dying and The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman. Neither are lengthy books and August is a long month, so I bet I can get them read.

My current "Great Courses" course is another 48-lecture (each lecture 30 minutes), "Art Across the Ages." I'm 30 lectures in. Really enjoying the course!

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Asterix Omnibus #5 (gosh, I like these comics; so funny, and clever wordplay throughout)
This Book is Not Good For You by Pseudonymous Bosch (third book in the series; very fun)(new)
Unlikely Friendships: 47 Remarkable Stories From the Animal Kingdom by Jennifer S. Holland (healing and happiness)(new)
Mohammed, Charlemagne, and the Origins of Europe by Richard Hodges (recommended by my Ancient History course)
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman (I feel like I should read this book but haven't gotten to it yet)
Boy Erased by Garrard Conley
The Point of It All by Charles Krauthammer (my sister recommended; I'll give it a "Nancy Pearl" shot)
The Threat by Andrew G. McCabe (I'm about 50 pp. in, and really enjoying it, and I'm a little surprised!
The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

206msf59
Aug 5, 9:13pm Top

Hi, Karen. I want to read They Called Us Enemy. As soon as I finish my current GNs, I will request it. I also loved Heart Berries, but I agree, it is a heart-breaker.

207klobrien2
Aug 6, 2:23pm Top

>206 msf59: Mark, it was really good! Reminded me much of the "March" graphic novels (John Lewis); in fact, some of the same people were involved in the production, I believe.

Thanks for stopping by to chat!

208klobrien2
Edited: Aug 15, 6:49pm Top



93.
Asterix Omnibus 5 by Rene Goscinny



209klobrien2
Edited: Aug 15, 6:50pm Top



94.
Heart Berries: A Memoir by Terese Marie Mailhot



210klobrien2
Edited: Aug 8, 9:36pm Top

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (I thank them!), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly! Karen's current reading (8/8 update):

Actively reading:

Unlikely Friendships: 47 Remarkable Stories From the Animal Kingdom by Jennifer S. Holland (healing and happiness)(new)
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright (I'm a good ways into this, really want to finish up)
The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper by Hallie Rubenhold (new)
The Second Worst Restaurant in France by Alexander McCall Smith (new)
Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend
White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for People to Talk About Racism by Robin J. DiAngelo

For the American Author Challenge, which this month features Ernest J. Gaines I'll be reading:

A Lesson Before Dying
The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman

My current "Great Courses" course is another 48-lecture (each lecture 30 minutes), "Art Across the Ages." I'm 36 lectures in.

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (this is a reread for me, but I want to read it again prior to reading The Testaments)
Washington Black by Esi Edugyan (NEW)
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan
This Book is Not Good For You by Pseudonymous Bosch (third book in the series; very fun)(new)
Mohammed, Charlemagne, and the Origins of Europe by Richard Hodges (recommended by my Ancient History course)
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
The Fall of Wisconsin by Dan Kaufman (I feel like I should read this book but haven't gotten to it yet)
Boy Erased by Garrard Conley
The Point of It All by Charles Krauthammer (my sister recommended; I'll give it a "Nancy Pearl" shot)
The Threat by Andrew G. McCabe (I'm about 50 pp. in, and really enjoying it, and I'm a little surprised!

213klobrien2
Edited: Aug 15, 6:52pm Top

214klobrien2
Edited: Aug 15, 7:45pm Top

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (I thank them!), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly! Karen's current reading (8/15 update)(several requested books came in--yikes!):

Actively reading:

Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright (I'm a good ways into this, really want to finish up)
The Second Worst Restaurant in France by Alexander McCall Smith (quirky; will finish in a day or two)
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan
White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for People to Talk About Racism by Robin J. DiAngelo
The Threat by Andrew G. McCabe (I'm about 50 pp. in, and really enjoying it, and I'm a little surprised!
The Point of It All by Charles Krauthammer (my sister recommended; I'll give it a "Nancy Pearl" shot)

For the American Author Challenge, which this month features Ernest J. Gaines I'll be reading:

A Lesson Before Dying
The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman

My current "Great Courses" course is another 48-lecture (each lecture 30 minutes), "Art Across the Ages." I'm 40 lectures in.

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Unlikely Heroes: 37 Inspiring Stories of Courage and Heart by Jennifer S. Holland
The Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell
The Rosie Result by Graeme Simsion
Devotions: The Selected Poems of Mary Oliver
Wundersmith: The Calling of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend
The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (this is a reread for me, but I want to read it again prior to reading The Testaments)
This Book is Not Good For You by Pseudonymous Bosch (third book in the series; very fun)
Mohammed, Charlemagne, and the Origins of Europe by Richard Hodges (recommended by my Ancient History course)
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
Boy Erased by Garrard Conley
Asterix Omnibus #6
Artemisia Gentileschi: The Image of the Female Hero in Italian Baroque Art by Mary D. Garrard

217klobrien2
Edited: Aug 22, 6:52pm Top

218klobrien2
Edited: Aug 19, 5:57pm Top

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (I thank them!), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly! Karen's current reading (8/19 update):

Actively reading:

The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman by Ernest J. Gaines
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright (I'm a good ways into this, really want to finish up)
Filthy Rich by James Patterson (written in 2016, about Jeffrey Epstein; reads really fast, how the heck did he get away with it for so long?)
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan
White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for People to Talk About Racism by Robin J. DiAngelo
The Threat by Andrew G. McCabe (I'm about 50 pp. in, and really enjoying it, and I'm a little surprised!
The Point of It All by Charles Krauthammer (my sister recommended; I'll give it a "Nancy Pearl" shot)

Finished my "Great Courses" (48-lectures, each lecture 30 minutes), "Art Across the Ages"! Yay! I've got a long list of possibilities for my next course. Decisions, decisions.

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Southern Lady Code: Essays by Helen Ellis (NEW)
The Boys, Volume 1: The Name of the Game by Garth Ennis (NEW)
Unlikely Heroes: 37 Inspiring Stories of Courage and Heart by Jennifer S. Holland
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell
The Rosie Result by Graeme Simsion
Devotions: The Selected Poems of Mary Oliver
Wundersmith: The Calling of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend
The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (this is a reread for me, but I want to read it again prior to reading The Testaments)
This Book is Not Good For You by Pseudonymous Bosch (third book in the series; very fun)
Mohammed, Charlemagne, and the Origins of Europe by Richard Hodges (recommended by my Ancient History course)
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
Boy Erased by Garrard Conley
Asterix Omnibus #6
Artemisia Gentileschi: The Image of the Female Hero in Italian Baroque Art by Mary D. Garrard
Our Sacred Signs: How Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Art Draw From the Same Source by Ori Z. Soltes

220klobrien2
Edited: Aug 22, 6:51pm Top



102.
Asterix Omnibus 6 by Rene Goscinny


222klobrien2
Aug 23, 5:10pm Top

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (I thank them!), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly! Karen's current reading (8/22 update):

Actively reading:

The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman by Ernest J. Gaines
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright (I'm a good ways into this, really want to finish up)
Filthy Rich by James Patterson (written in 2016, about Jeffrey Epstein; reads really fast, how the heck did he get away with it for so long?)
A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O'Nan
White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for People to Talk About Racism by Robin J. DiAngelo
The Threat by Andrew G. McCabe (I'm about 50 pp. in, and really enjoying it, and I'm a little surprised!
The Point of It All by Charles Krauthammer (my sister recommended; I'll give it a "Nancy Pearl" shot)

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Sorry I'm Late, I Didn't Want to Come: One Introvert's Year of Saying Yes by Jessica Pan
Southern Lady Code: Essays by Helen Ellis (NEW)
Unlikely Heroes: 37 Inspiring Stories of Courage and Heart by Jennifer S. Holland
A Lesson Before Dying by Ernest J. Gaines
The Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell
The Rosie Result by Graeme Simsion
Devotions: The Selected Poems of Mary Oliver
Wundersmith: The Calling of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend
The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (this is a reread for me, but I want to read it again prior to reading The Testaments)
This Book is Not Good For You by Pseudonymous Bosch (third book in the series; very fun)
Mohammed, Charlemagne, and the Origins of Europe by Richard Hodges (recommended by my Ancient History course)
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
Boy Erased by Garrard Conley
Our Sacred Signs: How Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Art Draw From the Same Source by Ori Z. Soltes

224klobrien2
Edited: Sep 5, 8:37pm Top

225klobrien2
Edited: Sep 5, 8:33pm Top

226klobrien2
Edited: Aug 29, 9:44pm Top

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (I thank them!), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly! Karen's current reading (8/29 update):

Actively reading:

The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman by Ernest J. Gaines - this is for the August AAC, so must hit this one first!
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright (I'm a good ways into this, really want to finish up)
White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for People to Talk About Racism by Robin J. DiAngelo
Unlikely Heroes: 37 Inspiring Stories of Courage and Heart by Jennifer S. Holland - loving this series!
The Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell - hard to get started, but I'll give it a shot
The Rosie Result by Graeme Simsion - great series of books; about 50 pages into this one
Devotions: The Selected Poems of Mary Oliver - a well-loved poet; I think I might need my own copy of this!

For the September American Author Challenge, I will read Storyteller by Leslie Marmon Silko

I'm having a Great Courses festival, I guess! Just got two more from the library: "King Arthur: History and Legend" and "Meteorology: Introduction to the Wonders of the Weather." These are only (!) 24 sessions of 30 minutes each.

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Sorry I'm Late, I Didn't Want to Come: One Introvert's Year of Saying Yes by Jessica Pan
Southern Lady Code: Essays by Helen Ellis (NEW)
Wundersmith: The Calling of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend
The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (this is a reread for me, but I want to read it again prior to reading The Testaments)
This Book is Not Good For You by Pseudonymous Bosch (third book in the series; very fun)
Mohammed, Charlemagne, and the Origins of Europe by Richard Hodges (recommended by my Ancient History course)
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
Boy Erased by Garrard Conley
Our Sacred Signs: How Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Art Draw From the Same Source by Ori Z. Soltes
This Land is Our Land by Suketu Mehta
The Threat by Andrew G. McCabe (I'm about 50 pp. in, and really enjoying it, and I'm a little surprised!
The Point of It All by Charles Krauthammer (my sister recommended; I'll give it a "Nancy Pearl" shot)

227klobrien2
Edited: Sep 5, 8:33pm Top



107.
Asterix Omnibus 7 by Rene Goscinny


228klobrien2
Edited: Sep 5, 8:33pm Top



108.
The Rosie Result by Graeme Simsion


230klobrien2
Edited: Sep 5, 8:33pm Top



110.
Cowboys and Aliens by Scott Mitchell Rosenberg


231klobrien2
Edited: Sep 5, 8:33pm Top

232klobrien2
Edited: Sep 5, 9:52pm Top

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (I thank them!), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly! Karen's current reading (9/5 update):

Actively reading:

Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright (I'm a good ways into this, really want to finish up)
White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for People to Talk About Racism by Robin J. DiAngelo
Devotions: The Selected Poems of Mary Oliver - a well-loved poet; I think I might need my own copy of this!
This Book is Not Good For You by Pseudonymous Bosch (third book in the series; very fun)
Wundersmith: The Calling of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend
Sorry I'm Late, I Didn't Want to Come: One Introvert's Year of Saying Yes by Jessica Pan

For the September American Author Challenge, I will read Storyteller by Leslie Marmon Silko

I'm having a Great Courses festival, I guess! Just got two more from the library: "King Arthur: History and Legend" (9 of 24 lectures completed), and "Meteorology: Introduction to the Wonders of the Weather" (0 of 24 completed).

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Southern Lady Code: Essays by Helen Ellis (NEW)
The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (this is a reread for me, but I want to read it again prior to reading The Testaments)
Mohammed, Charlemagne, and the Origins of Europe by Richard Hodges (recommended by my Ancient History course)
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
Boy Erased by Garrard Conley
Our Sacred Signs: How Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Art Draw From the Same Source by Ori Z. Soltes
This Land is Our Land by Suketu Mehta
The Threat by Andrew G. McCabe (I'm about 50 pp. in, and really enjoying it, and I'm a little surprised!
The Point of It All by Charles Krauthammer (my sister recommended; I'll give it a "Nancy Pearl" shot)
Mrs. Bridge by Evan S. Connell

233humouress
Sep 7, 4:31am Top

>232 klobrien2: Some intriguing books. I look forward to reading what you have to say about them.

234klobrien2
Sep 9, 8:50pm Top

>233 humouress: I used to spend a lot of time with "reviews"; now I realize that I'd rather be reading. I feel as if I'm doing well enough if I keep a log and get a star rating out. If someone asks me about a book, I'm glad to respond, though!

Thanks for stopping by!

235klobrien2
Edited: Sep 15, 4:08pm Top

237klobrien2
Edited: Sep 15, 4:10pm Top



114.
Asterix Omnibus 8 by Rene Goscinny


238klobrien2
Edited: Sep 15, 4:11pm Top

239klobrien2
Edited: Sep 15, 4:13pm Top



116.
Mohammed, Charlemagne & the Origins of Europe by Richard Hodges and David Whitehouse


240klobrien2
Edited: Sep 15, 2:39pm Top

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (I thank them!), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly! Karen's current reading (9/12 update):

Actively reading:

The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (this is a reread for me, but I want to read it again prior to reading The Testaments)
Our Sacred Signs: How Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Art Draw From the Same Source by Ori Z. Soltes
Fascism: A Warning by Madeline Albright (I'm a good ways into this, really want to finish up)
White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for People to Talk About Racism by Robin J. DiAngelo
Devotions: The Selected Poems of Mary Oliver - a well-loved poet; I think I might need my own copy of this!
Wundersmith: The Calling of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend

For the September American Author Challenge, I will read Storyteller by Leslie Marmon Silko

Current Great Courses course: "Meteorology: Introduction to the Wonders of the Weather" (2 of 24 completed).

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Unlikely Friendships: Dogs by Jennifer S. Holland (great series, spirit-cleansing books)
Hollow Kingdom by Kira Jane Buxton
Southern Lady Code by Helen Ellis
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
Boy Erased by Garrard Conley
This Land is Our Land by Suketu Mehta
The Threat by Andrew G. McCabe (I'm about 50 pp. in, and really enjoying it, and I'm a little surprised!
The Point of It All by Charles Krauthammer (my sister recommended; I'll give it a "Nancy Pearl" shot)
Mrs. Bridge by Evan S. Connell
The Wife by Meg Wolitzer (just saw the movie, must read the book!)
This Isn't What it Looks Like by Pseudonymous Bosch (love this kids' series)

Added 9/15/19:

The History of the Kings of Britain by Geoffrey of Monmouth
Idylls of the King and Other Arthurian Poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Marie de France: Seven of Her Lays Done into English
The Vision of History in Early Britain by Robert W. Hanning
Camelot 3000 by Mike W. Barr

242klobrien2
Sep 15, 2:38pm Top

The Great Courses I've taken have prompted my continued reading in the subject(s), and my last one even more so than usual. The course was, "King Arthur: History and Legend," and look at the list of stuff I have waiting for me:

The History of the Kings of Britain by Geoffrey of Monmouth
Idylls of the King and Other Arthurian Poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Marie de France: Seven of Her Lays Done into English
The Vision of History in Early Britain by Robert W. Hanning
Camelot 3000 by Mike W. Barr

And movies!

The Fisher King
Excalibur
Monty Python and the Holy Grail

Can't wait to get at them!

243harrygbutler
Sep 15, 3:20pm Top

>242 klobrien2: That looks like a good lineup, Karen. Have you read/do you plan on reading more of the medieval Arthurian tales, such as the romances by Chrétien de Troyes?

244klobrien2
Sep 15, 4:07pm Top

>243 harrygbutler: Would definitely like to! Do you have any recommendations?

And thanks for stopping by to chat!

245drneutron
Sep 15, 8:47pm Top

That really looks like fun!

246klobrien2
Sep 16, 6:52pm Top

Hi, Jim! Do you mean the "King Arthur"-athon? The Great Courses course itself was a lot of fun--the teacher, Dorsey Armstrong, is smart and funny, and her descriptions and explanations of the sources made me want more of them!

Thanks for stopping by!

247klobrien2
Sep 16, 6:52pm Top

118. The Boys Omnibus 3 by Garth Ennis

248harrygbutler
Sep 17, 9:30am Top

>244 klobrien2: Hi, Karen! I'd suggest trying out, in particular, Chrétien's Yvain and Erec and Enide, and, if you enjoy them moving on to his Lancelot, or the Knight of the Cart and Perceval, the Story of the Grail (but those two weren't completed by him and thus may prove less satisfying), as his works stand at the beginning of the long vogue of Arthurian romance. I can also recommend Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parzival and Gottfried von Strassburg's Tristan (as the Tristan & Isolde story ended up part of the Arthurian cycle, even if it may not have started out there.

There are some huge French works in the tradition, but a couple pieces were made available in English translation via Penguin Books years ago that you may find worth a look, The Quest of the Holy Grail and The Death of King Arthur.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is an excellent poem in a difficult Middle English dialect, but readily available in modern English.

If your sampling prompts you to look further afield and you have access to an academic library or ILL, there are a number of other works put out in the Arthurian Archives series published by the Boydell & Brewer imprint D. S. Brewer, including examples of Dutch, Italian, Latin, and Norse romances, as well as French and German with both text and (generally highly readable) English translation. I in particular recall enjoying the Dutch Ferguut.

249klobrien2
Sep 19, 6:59pm Top

Hi, Harry! Your recommendations sounded so familiar to me; I'm glad that I retained something from the course! Your tips will be very helpful to me as I move forward with this "project." So far, I've sampled the books and watched two of the movies (Excalibur and Monty Python and the Holy Grail), both very entertaining in their own ways.

Thanks for your assistance--it was very chivalric of you!

250klobrien2
Sep 19, 7:34pm Top

119. Fascism: A Warning by Madeleine Albright

251klobrien2
Sep 19, 9:24pm Top

I've been having a tremendous time watching Ken Burns's "Country Music" mini-series, currently airing on PBS. It's a set of 8 2-hour episodes, four of which have aired; the last one will be aired 9/25. There is such an immense plethora of film clips, music clips, new interviews--I find it just fascinating. It does take a bit of time, though (16 hours worth by the end) so my reading time has diminished. Well worth it, though.

252klobrien2
Edited: Yesterday, 10:07am Top

Okay, I guess I'm doing my weekly update on Thursdays, so here goes for this week:

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (I thank them!), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly! Karen's current reading (9/22 update to 9/19 list):

Actively reading:

The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood (this is a reread for me, but I want to read it again prior to reading The Testaments). Update: I bought them both as ebooks, so I'm not required to read them quickly, but I WANT to!
For the September American Author Challenge, I am reading Storyteller by Leslie Marmon Silko
Hollow Kingdom by Kira Jane Buxton. Very, very fun!
Marie de France: Seven of Her Lays Done into English
Our Sacred Signs: How Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Art Draw From the Same Source by Ori Z. Soltes
White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for People to Talk About Racism by Robin J. DiAngelo
Devotions: The Selected Poems of Mary Oliver - a well-loved poet; I think I might need my own copy of this!
Wundersmith: The Calling of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend
Can You Ever Forgive Me? by Lee Israel
Asterix Omnibus #9

Current Great Courses course: "Meteorology: Introduction to the Wonders of the Weather" (6 of 24 completed).

Not-So-Time-Sensitive-But-Still:

Southern Lady Code by Helen Ellis
Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
Boy Erased by Garrard Conley
The Threat by Andrew G. McCabe (I'm about 50 pp. in, and really enjoying it, and I'm a little surprised!
The Point of It All by Charles Krauthammer (my sister recommended; I'll give it a "Nancy Pearl" shot)
The Wife by Meg Wolitzer (just saw the movie, must read the book!)
This Isn't What it Looks Like by Pseudonymous Bosch (love this kids' series)
Marie de France: Seven of Her Lays Done into English
Idylls of the King and Other Arthurian Poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson
Camelot 3000 by Mike W. Barr

Group: 75 Books Challenge for 2019

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