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WebMage by Kelly McCullough
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WebMage

by Kelly McCullough

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Ravirn (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5291729,069 (3.73)20
  1. 10
    The Great Book of Amber by Roger Zelazny (aqualectrix)
  2. 00
    The Better Part of Darkness by Kelly Gay (noneofthis)
    noneofthis: For the influx of Greek mythology.
  3. 00
    Waywalkers by Catherine Webb (amberwitch)
    amberwitch: Two urban fantasies with immortal family squabbles, mythology and deities
  4. 00
    Lord of Light by Roger Zelazny (aqualectrix)
  5. 01
    Nine Princes In Amber by Roger Zelazny (aqualectrix)
    aqualectrix: McCullough's world of cyberpunk-magic has a very similar feel to Zelazny's Amber series.
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» See also 20 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
An interesting cast of characters. Children of the Fates - demi gods - tackle some big issues in their world views. The idea of fair folk (goblins, trolls, and even a pixie) actually being computers that shape shift to assist their owners better was unique. Mixing computer code hacking with magic spell casting isn't a first but it's still cool....Whistling binary is a nice touch though. I also loved the fact that the goddess of discord invented apple computers. ( )
  jrashk | Mar 3, 2017 |
1 ( )
  PhotoS | Feb 17, 2014 |
Okay, this book has disrupted my gym time for long enough. The good part: for the past month, I've been reading scientific papers to avoid reading this book. The bad part: I've been procrastinating about going to the gym to avoid both.
No more.
I'm pausing this book--not necessarily DNF'ing: I've made it about 80% through and that's just too far to give up. There's nothing wrong with it; it's just not for me.

However, if you like Fated or Something from the Nightside, this may very well be a good fit--definitely worth a try, at any rate.

I was going to do an amazon-style audience recommendations in lieu of a review, but it kind of devolved into a network of how I think the UF world fits together, and a network is extremely appropriate given the subject of the book.

Link to big version
I know the format's messy, but don't look at me--I didn't write the fitting algorithm (it's graphviz).
  page.fault | Sep 21, 2013 |
A good first novel, with reasonable sounding tech even 6-7 years after it was written. The characters are strong and interesting, although the main character isn't always that bright considering what a good hacker he's supposed to be. I absolutely adored his familiar and the vegetarian troll. The three Furies were also fabulous in a frightening way.

The action never stops and the hero is constantly being injured so severely he's often incapacitated but I love that so it worked for me. He has good supportive friends and the good folks are full of snarkiness and sarcasm. Best of all, Ravirn learns from his mistakes and he grows during the course of the novel which earns major points from me.

Something felt a little off about the story, though, mostly in the first half but I'm attributing it to first book awkwardness. I think the love interest stuff was too much, too soon and too fast as well but she was every bit his equal. The only possible sexism is that two female characters talk about sex constantly. It this is in a Greek pantheon and that fits right in. The women are very strong and intelligent, both good and bad and complex. Their world is t as. Lack and white as most UF which is good because Greek mythology wasn't either. I like the focus on the Fates and the Furies, rather than the traditional gods as well and I like how clear it is that these are the goddesses that really have the power over the life and death of everyone including each other.

I don't like the virtual reality way of looking at programming. I guess the idea is to make it fit with magic when he actual enters the code with bis mind and sees it like he would see something in physical reality but I think it's a cop out to make it easier to explain things. A good programmer doesn't need a visual image to code. At one point the Ravern is looking at the graphic representation of code onscreen and, referring to a gateway, says, "It looked something like a subway tunnel..."

The other big problem I had was that the gods had all taken to the whole computing thing to the point that monastics worshiped Turing. They were all excellent programmers and all the old magic like spells and ley lines had all been converted to computer code. Faerie rings were no longer used because they were too dangerous. I just didn't buy that a technology that's considerably less than a century old immediately and thoroughly supplants magic that has been using the same methods for millennia. I think this would have worked a little better if there were another explanation such as that in one of the realities computer science had been around for 100's of years already or that time passed faster in faerie or that something horrific had happened that made the old ways very dangerous. I just needed something to make it more believable.

But I did enjoy it and will read the next one. After all, one of my very favorite series, Downside Ghosts, is based on an even more ridiculous premise. Once you accept the premise, the rest is brilliant. Maybe that will be the case as this series progresses. At the very least, it is a fresh idea in a genre full of same old same old. ( )
  maybedog | Apr 5, 2013 |
A good first novel, with reasonable sounding tech even 6-7 years after it was written. The characters are strong and interesting, although the main character isn't always that bright considering what a good hacker he's supposed to be. I absolutely adored his familiar and the vegetarian troll. The three Furies were also fabulous in a frightening way.

The action never stops and the hero is constantly being injured so severely he's often incapacitated but I love that so it worked for me. He has good supportive friends and the good folks are full of snarkiness and sarcasm. Best of all, Ravirn learns from his mistakes and he grows during the course of the novel which earns major points from me.

Something felt a little off about the story, though, mostly in the first half but I'm attributing it to first book awkwardness. I think the love interest stuff was too much, too soon and too fast as well but she was every bit his equal. The only possible sexism is that two female characters talk about sex constantly. It this is in a Greek pantheon and that fits right in. The women are very strong and intelligent, both good and bad and complex. Their world is t as. Lack and white as most UF which is good because Greek mythology wasn't either. I like the focus on the Fates and the Furies, rather than the traditional gods as well and I like how clear it is that these are the goddesses that really have the power over the life and death of everyone including each other.

I don't like the virtual reality way of looking at programming. I guess the idea is to make it fit with magic when he actual enters the code with bis mind and sees it like he would see something in physical reality but I think it's a cop out to make it easier to explain things. A good programmer doesn't need a visual image to code. At one point the Ravern is looking at the graphic representation of code onscreen and, referring to a gateway, says, "It looked something like a subway tunnel..."

The other big problem I had was that the gods had all taken to the whole computing thing to the point that monastics worshiped Turing. They were all excellent programmers and all the old magic like spells and ley lines had all been converted to computer code. Faerie rings were no longer used because they were too dangerous. I just didn't buy that a technology that's considerably less than a century old immediately and thoroughly supplants magic that has been using the same methods for millennia. I think this would have worked a little better if there were another explanation such as that in one of the realities computer science had been around for 100's of years already or that time passed faster in faerie or that something horrific had happened that made the old ways very dangerous. I just needed something to make it more believable.

But I did enjoy it and will read the next one. After all, one of my very favorite series, Downside Ghosts, is based on an even more ridiculous premise. Once you accept the premise, the rest is brilliant. Maybe that will be the case as this series progresses. At the very least, it is a fresh idea in a genre full of same old same old. ( )
1 vote maybedog | Apr 5, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
McCullough, KellyAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lagerman, JudithCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McGrath, ChristianCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Laura, my heart.
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"Nothing here," said Melchior, his voice echoing from the depths of an ancient citrus-wood chest.
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"Ravirn is not your average computer geek. A child of the Fates, literally, he's a hacker extraoridinaire who can zero in on the fatal flaw in any program. Now that twenty-first-century magic has gone digital, that makes him a very talented sorcerer. But a world of problems is about to be downloaded on Ravirn, who's just trying to pass his college midterms ..."--Book jacket.… (more)

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