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James Wong's Homegrown Revolution by…
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James Wong's Homegrown Revolution

by James Wong

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334504,927 (3.75)2
  1. 00
    Vom Beet in die Küche: Von Bambussprossen über Dahlienknollen bis zu Süsskartoffelblättern Basiswissen Biogärtnern und Kochrezepte by Sabine Reber (MarthaJeanne)
    MarthaJeanne: Both books explain how to grow unusual vegetables. On is based in southern England, the other in Switzerland, but growing conditions seem to be similar.
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Showing 4 of 4
Full of great ideas on how to grow non-standard fruits and vegetables in your allotment or garden. I enjoyed the style of the book and am definitely going to try a few things next year. ( )
  floriferous | Jun 30, 2013 |
An interesting read, some good ideas but a bit to different for my tastes ( )
  Silverlily26 | Apr 28, 2013 |
Wong gives information on many plants that can be easily grown in the UK. My season is usually similar enough to the South of the UK that most of these would work for me. Many are actually perennials or even trees. To really grow all the things from this book that I would like would lake a much bigger garden that I have. But some of them will work. Off to the garden store with book in hand!

Reducing the stars by 1/2 because the index does not include the latin names. As many of the plants have more than one English name, even in England it would be important to be able to check against a latin name. For me it is extremely important. ( )
1 vote MarthaJeanne | Apr 6, 2013 |
James Wong lifts the lid on all sorts of different edible plants that can be easily grown and are mostly readily available in New Zealand. How about trying Hyacinth beans, water celery, dahlia yam or vanilla grass?Each entry contains information on growing, harvesting and eating and many include a recipe. This book is invaluable for any home gardener who is eager to try something new. ( )
  RefPenny | Feb 1, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0297867121, Hardcover)

James's idea is simple and revolutionary. For 100 years, gardening books have said the same old thing about growing the same old fruit and vegetables. But in the wider world, as well as closer to home, there is a huge variety of delicious and often simple-to-grow incredible edibles suitable for temperate climates. Often common plants grown for flowers, like fuchsia, have delicious fruits or hips but we have long forgotten their use as edible plants. As the demand for 'home-grown' produce increases, this is the perfect time to introduce a whole new range of tasty, healthy and productive alternatives to the humble spud or lettuce. And who better to blaze the trail than the vastly knowledgeable and enthusiastic James Wong who tells us what to grow, how to grow it, and how to cook and eat it as well as the special properties of 100 new plants.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:13 -0400)

James's idea is simple and revolutionary. For 100 years, gardening books have said the same old thing about growing the same old fruit and vegetables. But in the wider world, as well as closer to home, there is a huge variety of delicious and often simple-to-grow incredible edibles suitable for temperate climates.… (more)

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