HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Signal to Noise by Silvia Moreno-Garcia
Loading...

Signal to Noise

by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2511669,247 (3.75)11
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 11 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
"I hate this city," she told the pillow, because she wouldn't tell him.

Music as magic. 1988 and 2009. A story split between two fixed points, a friendship then and what it might be now.

Set in Mexico City, this novel follows a young teen named Meche, a loner who adores music and is friends with two other loners, Sebastian and Daniela. When Meche discovers she can cast spells using records, her life is changed.

Initially, it seems this magical skill can only improve Meche's life, even though Sebastian and Daniela are less convinced. Angry teenagers wielding magic leads right where you can imagine, and I loved every minute of it. Moreno-Garcia beautifully articulates that awful, oppressive, unshakeable frustration one suffers as a teen, and the ugly wishes Meche manifests resonated with me so strongly. At times, Meche is so unlikable, but realistically so: you want to shake her as much as hug her.

Interwoven in Meche's story is that of her father, a music lover searching for a magical fix of his own, so to speak. His own happy ending. The journey to find it has costs, like Meche's journey for happiness. The bittersweet realism in this book is what keeps it from being flimsy, soft, or too fantastical.

I could have taken another two hundred pages of this book; I wasn't ready to leave Meche as a teen or adult. Like a great mix that leaves you laying on bed in the dark, not asleep, not awake, Signal to Noise left me satisfied and wanting more. ( )
  unabridgedchick | Feb 12, 2019 |
Really effective story of three teens growing up in Mexico City who discover they can cast magic spells while using music to focus. Part coming-of-age story, part romance, partly a love-letter to classic pop music and vinyl records, and partly a story of friendships and family dissolving. The eventual homecoming where everything is laid bare is told in a flashback / present time narrative structure that actually served more to keep me guessing the reasons why than I would have originally thought it would. The climactic elements were quite powerful and very well done. I felt genuinely upset at the decisions the main characters were making. I had obviously come to care a lot about the outcome, and the ending did not let me down. IÛªd highly recommend this story to readers who enjoy a well-done character-driven story with some speculative elements. ( )
  michaeladams1979 | Oct 11, 2018 |
This reminded me so much of the stories I loved when I was like, 12...scary stories written by [a:Christopher Pike|19954|Christopher Pike|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1336315535p2/19954.jpg] and [a:Caroline B. Cooney|9059|Caroline B. Cooney|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1232258357p2/9059.jpg] and [a:Richie Tankersley Cusick|13733|Richie Tankersley Cusick|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1255793826p2/13733.jpg] about teens stumbling into dangerous magic and the consequences of unlocking hidden powers. But this book was better in some ways because of its setting and characters: Mexico City teens dealing with things like poverty, alcoholism, divorce, and abuse, written with obvious love and care by an author who knows what she's doing. I enjoyed this book as both a hit of nostalgia and also as a reassurance that my daughter, when she's old enough, will have wonderful stories like this to scare her and make her love reading like I did. ( )
  ElleGato | Sep 27, 2018 |
Hold on a moment while I slip into some stirrup pants, a knit sweater from The Limited, and my pink leather flats because we are going back to the 80s. This book takes place in 1989 and 2009, the former when Meche was a teenager and the latter when she returned home to Mexico City for a family event.

The 80s stuff was so great. I was a teenager in the 80s, though I'm a few years older than Meche, and everything was on point. The clothes, the hair, and most especially the music anchor you in place. (I have so many notes about songs I want to listen to.) And it was so very teenager, if you remember how it was back then, so full of the feeling that you were on the brink of something magical. And in Meche's case, she truly was.

The Oughts stuff of this novel somehow felt less locked into place than the 80s stuff, and to great effect because even though the Oughts were the "present" of this novel, it's the 80s that were the center of the story.

Meche is so great. When she's a teenager she's... well, she's a teenager. She lets the power she's always been denied go to her head and she is impetuous and sometimes cruel. And she's stubborn and almost humorously cannot share her emotions with anyone. She retains some of that emotional immaturity as an adult, but she's trying to deal with it, and her doing so results in one of the best scenes in the novel.

This is a book of flawed people doing the best they can, about magic and music, and about love.

[I received this book free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.] ( )
1 vote tldegray | Sep 21, 2018 |
Interesting concept and setting, definitely different, and that part I liked. The switching between past and now was well done. In the end, though, my feeling about this book is lukewarm. The main problem is the characters. When you know the full story, it becomes clear that Meche is a b*tch. Sure, I can come up with excuses (magic corrupts, she is a stupid teenager who can't control herself, she didn't understand the dangers), but the truth of the matter is, they just don't cut it. What's worse, I don't feel that the book judges her for what she does. It's as if we are supposed to understand it, supposed to stick with her. For one, I can't, and for two, I don't feel there is enough growth to her character. She comes back to town resentful instead of remorseful. On top of that, I really don't see what Sebastian sees in her. The end doesn't make sense to me. So, mwah. ( )
  zjakkelien | Jan 2, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Meche folded the magazine and finally decided to look out the window.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
A literary fantasy about love, music and sorcery, set against the background of Mexico City.

Mexico City, 1988: Long before iTunes or MP3s, you said “I love you” with a mixtape. Meche, awkward and fifteen, has two equally unhip friends -- Sebastian and Daniela -- and a whole lot of vinyl records to keep her company. When she discovers how to cast spells using music, the future looks brighter for the trio. With help from this newfound magic, the three friends will piece together their broken families, change their status as non-entities, and maybe even find love...

Mexico City, 2009: Two decades after abandoning the metropolis, Meche returns for her estranged father’s funeral. It’s hard enough to cope with her family, but then she runs into Sebastian, and it revives memories from her childhood she thought she buried a long time ago. What really happened back then? What precipitated the bitter falling out with her father? And, is there any magic left?
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

"Mexico City, 1988: Long before iTunes or MP3s, you said "I love you" with a mixtape. Meche, awkward and fifteen, has two equally unhip friends, Sebastian and Daniela, and a whole lot of vinyl records to keep her company. When she discovers how to cast spells using music, the future looks brighter for the trio. The three friends will piece together their broken families, change their status as non-entities, and maybe even find love. Mexico City, 2009: Two decades after abandoning the metropolis, Meche returns for her estranged father's funeral. It's hard enough to cope with her family, but then she runs into Sebastian, reviving memories from her childhood she thought she buried a long time ago. What really happened back then? What precipitated the bitter falling out with her father? Is there any magic left?"--Page [4] of cover.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.75)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 3
2.5 2
3 12
3.5 4
4 28
4.5 3
5 9

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 136,414,504 books! | Top bar: Always visible