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Just So Stories by Rudyard Kipling

Just So Stories (1902)

by Rudyard Kipling

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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English (52)  Swedish (1)  All languages (53)
Showing 1-5 of 52 (next | show all)
You are first introduced to what I believe are the "Just So" stories actually in the Jungle Books, especially Jungle Book II, when they are at the drying up waterhole with the predators on one side and the prey on the other. From there other bits of "jungle lore" are woven in while this is where my interest with this particular book came to life.

Kipling's "Just So Stories" are written more in fashion with Carroll's Alice stories. They are fantastical, have lessons hidden in them and at the same time are too frivolous to be taken at face value. Their age is given away by the subjects and how they are portrayed as well as the idea of the British Empire. Those who seem to be stuck on that mustn't forget in that timeframe how they thought or wrote those beliefs out wasn't looked down upon but rather commonplace.

What I didn't like was the fact that the pictures were in black and white. Although I know that it was in keeping with the original the pictures were too dark to be able to see anything. The introduction of where he often added jokes and other trivia couldn't be seen nor the details. I would love for someone to eventually make some colored pictures, which could be tucked towards the back for those who are curious.

Otherwise I did enjoy the additions that Puffin added in the back - an Author File, a Who's Who, a Some Things To Think About, a Some Things To Do, a Did You Know and a Glossary. These extras give an opportunity to get to know more about the book and author while not being so heavy that it bores you out or makes you want to toss the book while reading it. Most definitely loved this formatting....

So what is my favorite story? "The Cat That Walked By Himself" although I don't like the idea of the idea perfect men would throw things at a cat they meet and be considered for coming up with that. Otherwise the attitude hits the cat right between the ears. ( )
  flamingrosedrakon | Aug 26, 2015 |
This is one of the most imaginative, playful, writerly books I have ever read. And re-read. Twenty-nine year-old Kipling wrote this collection of twelve stories in collaboration with his young daughter, Josephine. It is a series of fantastical accounts of creation and re-creation within the animal kingdom. For instance, it explains: "in the "squoggy marshy country somewhere in Africa," and "on the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River," the elephant got its long trunk when a crocodile got hold of his original "bulgy nose."

I include this collection in the grand storytelling tradition of Fables Choisies and Aesop's Fables. And this particular edition is a gem because it includes the original illustrations, with which none other compare.

As a writer, if ever I run short on words or inspiration, I need only re-visit one of these stories and the ideas start gushing.

As a mother, I think this is one of the best books I ever read to my son. It shows children the value of words and artful play, and gives license to the unlimited scope of imagination.
( )
  RobinGregoryAuthor | Aug 20, 2015 |
Cute stories of how the animals got to be who they are... ( )
  yougotamber | Aug 22, 2014 |
Rudyard Kipling's collection of fairy tales and fables formed the majority of my childhood literary diet.
I can't tell you how much I was fascinated by his (maybe somewhat secondhand) myths of a primordial world, where men and animals competed and coexisted in more than one sense, where ancient untold wonders and unspoken secrets abound, and where a man helps his daughter design the English alphabet.
Don't let my rose-colored glasses fool you - it's really an amazing work. Stop reading this review and pick up a copy. ( )
  zhyatt | Aug 9, 2014 |
reading aloud in bed - the best way to experience these tales again - tuning down or out the intermittent imperial bigotry - always a Kipling flaw, the one "time...[pardons]" him for, according to Auden, because he writes well - and particularly well for children.

( )
  CSRodgers | May 3, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 52 (next | show all)
My copy of Just So Stories, in it's brick-red cover with the Elephant's Child straining away with all his might to escape the jaws of the Crocodile on the banks of "the great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River", the Bi-Coloured-Python-Rock-Snake in close attendance was the first book I truly loved. ... Kipling has an Aesopian understanding of animals, our dealings with them and our curious interrelatedness, interdependence, how we can learn about our own strange behaviour, our vanities and our foolishness through them and through our relationship with them.
Han skriver med lätt hand och bitvis är det i bästa brittiska nonsenstradition, men i sin helhet förstås långt bort från Lewis Carrolls självklara genialitet. Barnen roas med vilda påhitt, verser, upprepningar och konstigheter.
I god sagoanda förväntar man sig att landa mjukt i sensmoralens klokskap. Men hos Kipling landar man hårt. När den lilla elefantungen som ständigt blir bestraffad för sin frågvishet tillägnar sig sin snabel, då är det för att ge igen för den misshandel han utstått.
[B]erättelserna är utformade med en sådan språklig uppfinningsrikedom – väl tillvaratagen av översättaren – att även mycket frågvisa lyssnare torde frestas att hålla tyst för att inte missa nästa fantasieggande formulering.
Just så-historierna liknar de ursprungsmyter som är avsedda att förklara hur något från början har gått till. Berättelsen om katten öppnar undan för undan världar, som vi förstår när vi blir äldre, medan barn direkt tar till sig djursagan.

» Add other authors (64 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Kipling, Rudyardprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Foreman, MichaelIllustratormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ingpen, RobertIllustratormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Puttapipat, NirootIllustratormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ambrus, Victor G.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Delessert, EtienneIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hallqvist, Britt G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mayan, EarlIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mordvinoff, NicolasIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Morris, JohnnyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moser, BarryIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reiner, CarlNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ward, HelenIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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In the sea, once upon a time, O my Best Beloved, there was a Whale, and he ate fishes.
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Twelve stories about animals and insects including How the Camel Got His Hump; How the First Letter was Written, and How the Rhinoceros Got His Skin.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0517266555, Hardcover)

Kipling's own drawings, with their long, funny captions, illustrate his hilarious explanations of How the Camel Got His Hump, How the Rhinoceros Got His Skin, How the Armadillo Happened, and other animal How's. He began inventing these stories in his American wife's hometown of Brattleboro, Vermont, to amuse his eldest daughter--and they have served ever since as a source of laughter for children everywhere.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:52 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

Twelve stories about animals, insects, and other subjects include "How the Camel Got His Hump." "The Butterfly That Stamped," and "How the Alphabet Was Made."

» see all 27 descriptions

Legacy Library: Rudyard Kipling

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Average: (4.04)
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1.5 3
2 19
2.5 5
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28 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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Penguin Australia

4 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141183624, 0141321628, 0141328398, 0141442409

Tantor Media

2 editions of this book were published by Tantor Media.

Editions: 140010064X, 1400108675


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