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Men of Iron by Howard Pyle
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Men of Iron (1891)

by Howard Pyle

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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» See also 31 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
Enjoyable YA adventure, set at the height of the age of chivalry, but written with the stong moral force (and occasional moralizing) of the Victorian era. ( )
  JackMassa | Nov 23, 2016 |
I was 12 or 13 when I read this. I don't think I could properly appreciate it at the time, culturally speaking. It offers interesting insight into life at the time, through an act of historical fiction. What I noticed most about the book, at the time, was the author's writing style. He could write a sentence the length of an entire paragraph, and yet have it be grammatically correct. ( )
  Michael_Rose | Jan 10, 2016 |
You really need to read the unabridged edition. There is another one that was watered down to be easier to understand. Don't read that one!

This would make a great movie. It reminds me of a cross between A Knights Tale (movie) and The Hedge Knight (book). ( )
  Chris_El | Mar 19, 2015 |
A long, long time ago...grammar school, I believe, we were told that it is generally considered bad form to attempt to write in accented dialog. The exception was if you were very, very good.

Howard Pyle is not very good.

I'm pretty sure he made up a bunch of his own words by adding -eth at the end of nearly every verb in character dialog. This was distracting to no end. The story, set in medieval times and focusing on squires and the knights they serve, was completely lost in this lame attempt at contemporary dialog.

I like reading Shakespeare. Pyle is no Shakespeare. Instead of period flavor, the result is complete frustration. ( )
  JeffV | Jun 13, 2014 |
I didn't know that this book was as old as "the White Company", but they hang together in my mind. Miles Falworth seeks to recover his family's honour. And of course he does. The 1950's movie "Black Shield of Falworth" was about what you'd expect. ( )
1 vote DinadansFriend | Nov 14, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Howard Pyleprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bennet, C. L.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The year 1400 opened with more than usual peacefulness in England.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0486428419, Paperback)

Master storyteller Howard Pyle at his best, incorporating fascinating historical information about life in a medieval castle, knighthood, and chivalry into the fast-moving and entertaining story of young Myles Falworth's fight to restore his family's rights and good name. The novel effortlessly teachers such virtues as courage, loyalty, steadfastness, and generosity.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:34 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

In seeking to avenge his unjustly accused father, young Myles Falworth is knighted and wins the friendship of King Henry IV.

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