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Saint Joan by George Bernard Shaw
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Saint Joan

by George Bernard Shaw

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Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
Images of Falconetti burned into my mind as I read, perhaps music of Messiaen. Fete des belles eaux? This is a very orthodox tale of moral and legal convulsion. Add a dash of divine nationalism and voila.

This Joan was rather quick witted, other representations have as a nascent martyr. Her oppressors, oppressively oafish--while Bluebeard muses of the Divine Rights and the souls of lumpen children (entertaining something ghastly--only Allah knows.

GB Shaw has impressed me this week, not only for the scale of his vision but the complexity of his characters. There is always tenderness and treachery afoot, often in the same character on a single page. ( )
  jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
A great play by Mr. Shaw. He managed to capture the essence, and reality, of Joan of Arc's predicament in impeccable prose. His talent, as a playwright, shines here. It is one of the more impressive plays that I have read in regards to the era it was published. ( )
  DanielSTJ | Dec 17, 2018 |
Interesting play, especially like the end of it where Joan interacts with her accusers and canonize-rs and discovered that their acceptance of her is contingent on her being long-dead. ( )
  Jamichuk | May 22, 2017 |
Recently reread this, after first reading it while in college. I found the epilogue a bit heavy-handed, but otherwise it was just as good a read as the first time around. ( )
  CarolJMO | Dec 12, 2016 |
piece de theatre les principaux actes de la vie de Jeanne.avec un peu d'humour de Shaw ( )
  Gerardlionel | Apr 2, 2016 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
George Bernard Shawprimary authorall editionscalculated
Blackstone Audio, Inc.Publishersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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No eggs! No eggs!! Thousand thunders, man, what do you mean by no eggs?
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Book description
Joan of Arc, born in 1412, was burned at the stake in 1431, canonized by the Catholic Church in 1920, and, like most saints, whitewashed by history. Canonization tends to strip a saint of supposedly un-Christian attributes such as rebelliousness, pride, and intolerance. And Joan, despite having been a stubborn, haughty, naive, even foolish girl, has for much of history been remembered only as a pious martyr. However, George Bernard Shaw's play, Saint Joan, completed in 1925, began the modern rehabilitation of the icon as a fully human, fallible character--not to mention a poster girl for teenage rebellion and feminism. Shaw's Joan, like the real Maid of Orleans, leads the fight to drive the English out of her native France, insists on direct communication with her God instead of submitting to the mediation of Catholic priests, and refuses to dress, speak, or act according to traditional notions of how women were expected to behave. Until the closing scene of Shaw's play, however, neither Joan nor her foes are cast in neatly heroic terms. Both are earnestly pursuing their partial visions of the truth. In the play's famous epilogue, Shaw suggests that even 400 years later, most of us are so limited by our own perspectives that we are unable to tell the difference between a saint and a heretic. "O God that madest this beautiful earth, when will it be ready to receive Thy saints?" Joan asks, preparing for her death. "How long, O Lord, how long?"
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0140437916, Paperback)

Joan of Arc, born in 1412, was burned at the stake in 1431, canonized by the Catholic Church in 1920, and, like most saints, whitewashed by history. Canonization tends to strip a saint of supposedly un-Christian attributes such as rebelliousness, pride, and intolerance. And Joan, despite having been a stubborn, haughty, naive, even foolish girl, has for much of history been remembered only as a pious martyr. However, George Bernard Shaw's play, Saint Joan, completed in 1925, began the modern rehabilitation of the icon as a fully human, fallible character--not to mention a poster girl for teenage rebellion and feminism. Shaw's Joan, like the real Maid of Orleans, leads the fight to drive the English out of her native France, insists on direct communication with her God instead of submitting to the mediation of Catholic priests, and refuses to dress, speak, or act according to traditional notions of how women were expected to behave. Until the closing scene of Shaw's play, however, neither Joan nor her foes are cast in neatly heroic terms. Both are earnestly pursuing their partial visions of the truth. In the play's famous epilogue, Shaw suggests that even 400 years later, most of us are so limited by our own perspectives that we are unable to tell the difference between a saint and a heretic. "O God that madest this beautiful earth, when will it be ready to receive Thy saints?" Joan asks, preparing for her death. "How long, O Lord, how long?" --Michael Joseph Gross

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:24 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

"With Saint Joan, Shaw reached the height of his fame as a dramatist. In this play he distilled many of the ideas he had been trying to express in earlier works on the sublects of politics, religion and creative evolution. Fascinated by the story of Joan of Arc, but unhappy with the way she had traditionally been depicted, Shaw wanted to remove 'the whitewash which disfigures her beyond recognition'. He presents a realistic Joan: proud, intolerant, naive, foolhardy, always brave - a rebel who challenged the conventions and values of her day."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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