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Fear: Trump in the White House

by Bob Woodward

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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1,512888,273 (3.87)65
With authoritative reporting honed through eight presidencies from Nixon to Obama, author Bob Woodward reveals in unprecedented detail the harrowing life inside President Donald Trump's White House and precisely how he makes decisions on major foreign and domestic policies. Woodward draws from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, meeting notes, personal diaries, files and documents. The focus is on the explosive debates and the decision-making in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Air Force One and the White House residence. Fear is the most intimate portrait of a sitting president ever published during the president's first years in office.… (more)
Recently added bynobooksnolife, private library, 2blackcats, jjansen1689, dblidy, colortheory, Maille, froggy20
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    The Caine Mutiny by Herman Wouk (M_Clark)
    M_Clark: The Caine Mutiny describes the experience of a WWII ship's crew when under the command of a mentally disturbed captain. It is a perfect accompaniment to reading about today's White House.
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» See also 65 mentions

English (85)  Dutch (1)  German (1)  French (1)  All languages (88)
Showing 1-5 of 85 (next | show all)
Probably the scariest book I've read. I have no reason to doubt that the content in this book is factual, but man, I really hope some of it was exaggerated. I will say that I thought Bob Woodward did a great job writing completely down the middle. There are some passages that paint Trump in a good light, but most of it, show someone not fit to be President (IHMO).

Fantastic book though. ( )
  cgfaulknerog | May 28, 2020 |
I respect Bob Woodward, a great journalist. This is not a great book. It was born out of a national obsession,which is of course the current President of the US. But I just had to read it, because I was obsessed like all the millions of readers who for a few short weeks gave this book wings( I borrowed my copy from my library).

It took me 3 days to read. From the begining I felt like I had entered and was lost in a deep dark jungle were a terrible storm rages. And when I finally turned the final page , it was as if I found my self in a clearing where the storm clouds made way for the sun.


Thank God for "Tarzan of the Apes", my next read. Maybe his jungle is better.

Nelson Agis ( )
  NAgis | May 6, 2020 |
It’s pretty good and even handed, but doesn’t contain as many surprises as you would think. Especially if you have been keeping up with the news. Apparently, Trump really doesn’t like free trade or immigration and is obsessed with projecting strength to the point where he will not admit any mistakes even those that are obvious to everyone. Shocking, I know. Bannon actually comes across as being more impressive than I expected. ( )
  PaulGodfread | Jan 30, 2020 |
Hard to judge without a way to check its accuracy, but the behind-the-scenes stuff reads like a bit of a stenography job on behalf of whichever insiders were willing to speak to the author. Obviously Woodward has far more credibility than someone like Michael Wolff, but I still get the feeling that he is willing to trade credulity for access.

Of course, if you want to write an inside account, you've got to rely on sources -- and I'm sure Woodward did what he could to check and corroborate their testimony. But if you're unable to get people on the record, or unwilling to show us readers your working, where does that leave us? We have to either swallow the finished product whole, or go through the tedious and uncertain process of reading between the lines to work out who must have been the source for each fact claim or vignette, and adjust accordingly. ( )
  matt_ar | Dec 6, 2019 |
We are all screwed. ( )
  nmorse | Dec 3, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 85 (next | show all)
For page after dumbfounding page, Fear reproduces, with gobsmacking credulity, the self-aggrandizing narratives of factitious scoundrels. Didion was absolutely right to class Woodward’s work as fundamentally a kind of “political pornography.” But Fear is to Woodward’s previous oeuvre of political pornography what Fifty Shades of Grey is to Twilight: vampiric fan-fiction repackaged as middlebrow smut.
added by Shortride | editn+1, Patrick Blanchfield (Sep 12, 2018)
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Bob Woodwardprimary authorall editionscalculated
Setterborg, GabrielTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Waltman, KjellTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Real power is---I don't even want to use the word---fear.
Presidential candidate Donald J. Trump in an interview with Bob Woodward and Robert Costa on March 31, 2016, at the Old Post Office Pavilion, Trump International Hotel, Washington, D.D.
Dedication
To Elsa
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In early September 2017, in the eighth month of the Trump presidency, Gary Cohn, the former president of Goldman Sachs and the president's top economic adviser in the White House, moved cautiously toward the Resolute Desk in the Oval Office. (Prologue)
A heartfelt thanks to Evelyn M. Duffy, my assistant on five books that have covered four presidents. (Author's Personal Note)
Interviews for this book were conducted under the journalistic ground rule of "deep background." (Note to Readers)
In August 2010, six years before taking over Donald Trump's winning presidential campaign, Steve Bannon, then 57 and a producer of right-wing political films, answered his phone.
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