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The Bean Trees (1988)

by Barbara Kingsolver

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Turtle (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9,241173678 (3.96)437
Clear-eyed and spirited, Taylor Greer grew up poor in rural Kentucky with the goals of avoiding pregnancy and getting away. But when she heads west with high hopes and a barely functional car, she meets the human condition head-on. By the time Taylor arrives in Tucson, Arizona, she has acquired a completely unexpected child, a three-year-old American Indian girl named Turtle, and must somehow come to terms with both motherhood and the necessity for putting down roots. Hers is a story about love and friendship, abandonment and belonging, and the discovery of surprising resources in apparently empty places.… (more)
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» See also 437 mentions

English (172)  Spanish (1)  All languages (173)
Showing 1-5 of 172 (next | show all)
Just flat out enjoyed this book ( )
  wincheryl | Jun 20, 2022 |
I am really enjoying reading all Kingsolver's books so far. Once again, I really like the characters and the story. One thing I really like about this one is it takes place in my part of the world so I understand the characters better than a lot of other books. This one actually takes place mostly in Tucson area where I was born.

This book is about family and friends and love and dedication. I highly recommend it. ( )
  KyleneJones | Apr 25, 2022 |
This was a bit slow moving at times, but it was a nice story and kept enough of my interest. It was a bit of a political statement about the immigration issue. I'm not sure about some of the facts in it, but still a good story. ( )
  Wren73 | Mar 4, 2022 |
Kingsolver's later works (The Poisonwood Bible) are wonderful, but her early stuff really sings. Most books can't make me laugh and cry, but this one did. I really enjoyed the characters, all of whom were real, engaging, and complex. Yes, it's short, but it still feels complete.

Highly recommended.
( )
  Cerestheories | Nov 8, 2021 |
I liked this book, and its portrayal of a part of our American society that I have had no experience with. Taylor is on a road trip, her first, to get away from rural Kentucky and find her own place in the world. Almost immediately, she finds herself caring for a very young Native American child, thrust into her care, a child we later learn has been brutally abused. The two of them continue on their way, swapping work for motel rooms, until they reach Arizona and find a kind of family. But then Taylor discovers that she has no legal right to raise the toddler in her care, unless she can legally adopt her, and that requires a trip back. Interlaced with this is the story of immigrants from Latin America who are not legally allowed to stay in the U.S. ( )
  ffortsa | Oct 21, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 172 (next | show all)
Barbara Kingsolver can write. On any page of this accomplished first novel, you can find a striking image or fine dialogue or a telling bit of drama.
 

» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Barbara Kingsolverprimary authorall editionscalculated
Critt, C.J.Narratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Desimini, LisaCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Noli, SuzanneCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pearce, SusanAuthor photosecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Annie and Joe
For Ismene, and all the mothers who have lost her (10th Anniversary Edition)
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I have been afraid of putting air in a tire ever since I saw a tractor tire blow up and throw Newt Hardbines's father over the top of the Standard Oil sign.
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I mean, we've got to live in the exact same world every damn day of the week, don't we?
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Clear-eyed and spirited, Taylor Greer grew up poor in rural Kentucky with the goals of avoiding pregnancy and getting away. But when she heads west with high hopes and a barely functional car, she meets the human condition head-on. By the time Taylor arrives in Tucson, Arizona, she has acquired a completely unexpected child, a three-year-old American Indian girl named Turtle, and must somehow come to terms with both motherhood and the necessity for putting down roots. Hers is a story about love and friendship, abandonment and belonging, and the discovery of surprising resources in apparently empty places.

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Average: (3.96)
0.5 1
1 19
1.5 7
2 91
2.5 20
3 506
3.5 118
4 1055
4.5 104
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