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An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and…
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An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness

by Kay Redfield Jamison

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,449282,516 (3.94)43
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  1. 20
    The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness by Elyn R. Saks (meggyweg)
  2. 00
    The Rules of the Tunnel: A Brief Period of Madness by Ned Zeman (kraaivrouw)
  3. 00
    Electroboy: A Memoir of Mania by Andy Behrman (SqueakyChu)
  4. 00
    The Day the Voices Stopped: A Schizophrenic's Journey from Madness to Hope by Ken Steele (meggyweg)
  5. 00
    A Mood Apart: The Thinker's Guide to Emotion and Its Disorders by Peter C. Whybrow (meggyweg)
  6. 01
    Hyper : en beretning om uro by Pernille Dysthe (grmb)
    grmb: Bøkene omhandler kvinner som i voksen alder får en diagnose på en kronisk psykiatrisk lidelse som i stor grad innvirker på deres liv, sitt forhold til seg selv og andre. Begge bøkene gir et godt innenfra perspektiv på hvordan det kan oppleves å ikke ha kontroll på stemningsnivå og uro. Begge bøkene kan bidra til økt forståelse for hvordan lidelsene; henholdsvis ADHD og bipolar lidelse arter seg-og at mennesker med psykiatrisk lidelse har en diagnose-ikke er en diagnose. De er to kvinner som finner sine strategier å leve med sitt handicap-på godt og vondt.… (more)
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English (27)  German (1)  All languages (28)
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
Clinical, yet easy enough for the layman to understand. Goes through both the experiences of the trained and obviously very intelligent psychatrist(logist? Can't remember) who is dealing with bi-polar, otherwise known as manic-depressive disorder. Fascinating, but I think it might be especially helpful for individuals with the disorder, or people who have family members with the disorder, as in my case. A great read. ( )
  steadfastreader | Mar 18, 2014 |
a popular book re bipolar. Julie Evans Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust.
  RCPsychLibrary | Jan 27, 2014 |
I had a very hard time with this book. It was a mix between a very dry birth of clinical mental health studies and a very vague, pretentious personal story.

The first few chapters were very promising, I felt there was passion infused in the pages as she spoke about her father, her military upbringing, her mother..her general early life. But as the story continued forward, it became more disjointed, dried out and read as if she used a thesaurus on every word humanly possible. It was overkill.

I admire Ms. Jamison for the strong, obviously intelligent psychologist that she is and for the great studies and growth she has brought to her field. On a personal level, I do not feel that her story was as honest and clear as it could've been. I didn't connect with her struggle, as it wasn't descriptive or deep.

It reads more as a clinical study and I would recommend this book only to those studying the field; not to the typical memoir lover. ( )
1 vote tealightful | Sep 24, 2013 |
A cathartic and expressive memoir by someone who has dealt with bipolar disorder. The all-consuming, tireless highs struggle with the dark, depressive, sickly lows. An excellent means of understanding this mental turmoil, how one can achieve the most stunning of successes, while grappling with the base desire to stay alive. ( )
  HadriantheBlind | Mar 30, 2013 |
My first acquaintance with the author of this book was in an article of The Washington Post Magazine quite a few years ago. I remember reading about a woman who was suffering from manic-depression. I was horrified to find out from that article that she was also a practicing clinical psychologist. Now, many years later, I finally have had the chance to read her memoir. I am so glad that the field of psychiatry has evolved as much as it has during the intervening years and look foward to yet more progress in the treatment of what is now called bipolar disporder.

Sadly, I know of people who have successfuly ended their young lives after having suffered with this disorder. My feeling is that anything the general public can do to help these individuals is a step in the right direction. Most of all, though, it's to the credit of Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison that the public has become more aware of this genetic disorder and its implications in an individual's life.

I took from this book the need for the public to accept each person affected with bipolar disorder with warmth and understanding and reject the stigmas that have been part of this mental illness in the past. I also expect that no one should assume to understand the demons of living with bipolar disorder, although the author does a magnificent job of putting her experiences into words.

My hope is that I'll be able to use what I've learned from this book in a positive manner to help others and continue to read works by Dr. Jamison and others in an effort to expand my knowledge of this devastating illness. ( )
5 vote SqueakyChu | Oct 5, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
I doubt sometimes whether
a quiet & unagitated life
would have suited me–yet I
sometimes long for it.
-Byron
Dedication
For my mother, Dell Temple Jamison
Who gave me life not once, but countless times
First words
When it's two o'clock in the morning, and you're manic, even the UCLA Medical Center has a certain appeal. (Prologue)
I was standing with my head back, one pigtail caught between my teeth, listening to the jet overhead.
Quotations
"Moods are such an essential part of the substance of life, of one's notion of oneself, that even psychotic extremes in mood and behavior can somehow be seen as temporary, even understandable, reactions to what life has dealt."
"It took me far too long to realize that lost years and relationships cannot be recovered, that damage done to oneself and others cannot always be put right again, and that freedom from the control imposed by medication loses its meaning when the only alternatives are death and insanity."
"If we got rid of all the manic-depressives on the medical school faculty, not only would we have a much smaller faculty, it would also be a far more boring one." (chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at Johns Hopkins Hospital)
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Book description
In her memoir, Unquiet Mind, Jamison tells of her battle with the illness: the joy of the manic highs, which gave her an omnipotent feeling of cosmic connectedness, and the terrifying depressions, when she wanted only to die. An Unquiet Mind tells of how Jamison used her zeal and intensity, and her impressive intellectual gfts, to bring the complexities of manic-depressive illness to the world's attention. Her work has helped save countless lives.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0679763309, Paperback)

In Touched with Fire, Kay Redfield Jamison, a psychiatrist, turned a mirror on the creativity so often associated with mental illness. In this book she turns that mirror on herself. With breathtaking honesty she tells of her own manic depression, the bitter costs of her illness, and its paradoxical benefits: "There is a particular kind of pain, elation, loneliness and terror involved in this kind of madness.... It will never end, for madness carves its own reality." This is one of the best scientific autobiographies ever written, a combination of clarity, truth, and insight into human character. "We are all, as Byron put it, differently organized," Jamison writes. "We each move within the restraints of our temperament and live up only partially to its possibilities." Jamison's ability to live fully within her limitations is an inspiration to her fellow mortals, whatever our particular burdens may be. --Mary Ellen Curtin

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:34:47 -0400)

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The author recounts her own personal struggle with manic-depression and how it has shaped her life.

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