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The Story of Venus and Tannhauser (1907)

by Aubrey Beardsley, Aubrey Beardsley, John Glassco

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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268383,301 (2.91)9
Left unfinished at Beardsley's death, this re-telling of the old legend is a witty account of Tannhasuer's visit to the glamorous pleasure palace of Venus. It combines Beardsley's fascination for abandoning oneself to sexual pleasure and his love of the artificial and exotic. This edition contains illustrations by the author and was completed in 1959 by the poet John Glassco.… (more)
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» See also 9 mentions

Showing 3 of 3
This is what you get when you cross a piece of Victorian erotica with a Decadent's imagination and a rather better quality of writing.

I have a pretty big vocabulary, but I had to look up dozens of words to get through this. My favorite new word: susurrus. I love the way Beardsley plays with language. ( )
  AlainaZ | Jun 5, 2022 |
Beardsley is more of an artist than a writer apparently, the drawings in this are quite odd looking. Its about a man who goes to a party under the hill much like the opera above, except Venus is referred to as Helen in this instance.
After the party the protagonist does a sort of list of his favorite erotic pictures and novels and then its pretty much over.
I don't really get it, its supposed to be filth and i got the occasional hint of that with women wearing false-mustaches and certain suggestive elements at the end between Helen and her pet unicorn Adolphe... but it felt pointless. ( )
  wreade1872 | Nov 28, 2021 |
Just didn't do much for me. High-brow erotica? What's the point? To me, it was too formalized to be erotic and just came across as slightly silly. ( )
  AliceAnna | Oct 23, 2014 |
Showing 3 of 3
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» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Aubrey Beardsleyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Aubrey Beardsleymain authorall editionsconfirmed
Glassco, Johnmain authorall editionsconfirmed
Cranshoff, WernerTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Glassco, JohnAuthorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Oresko, RobertIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The Story of Venus and Tannhauser was also published under the title Under the Hill.
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Left unfinished at Beardsley's death, this re-telling of the old legend is a witty account of Tannhasuer's visit to the glamorous pleasure palace of Venus. It combines Beardsley's fascination for abandoning oneself to sexual pleasure and his love of the artificial and exotic. This edition contains illustrations by the author and was completed in 1959 by the poet John Glassco.

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