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Statements: True Tales of Life, Love, and Credit Card Bills

by Amy Borkowsky

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332721,677 (2.9)1
She was too busy to keep a diary. Luckily, AmEx kept one for her. From comedian Amy Borkowsky comes a hilarious collection about how she-quite literally-spent her early years as a single career woman. After digging out several dust-covered boxes from the back of her closet, Amy discovered twelve years' worth of credit card statements, documenting, in their own way, every significant event in her life. They show that on July 12, 1993, Amy spent $189.12 at Victoria's Secret, and that on July 14 she returned the entire purchase-evidence of a relationship that suddenly unraveled, right before The Lingerie Phase. The $601.76 she spent at Ann Taylor reminds her of her quest to find a suit that would cover not only her torso but also her career-related insecurities, and a $30.25 charge for her first Caller ID box recalls her first fruitless attempts to block out her interfering mother. Every purchase tells a story, and this wickedly funny account relates Amy's search for what every young woman is really shopping for in life: love, success, and independence.… (more)
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A funny look at life through one's credit card statements. A financial diary of sorts with misadventures, dating fiascoes, and almost-triumphant successes and a dash of humor to boot. ( )
  AngelaLam | Feb 8, 2022 |
I mostly enjoyed this lighthearted look at the life (and credit card charges) of a single girl, but there was one point where I very nearly shut the book and didn't continue. The author made an offhand remark about "... how [she] could have bought literally thousands of dollars of food that year and never once made a purchase at Lane Bryant."; I found this to be in extremely poor taste, and even though it was not directed at me, I was quite hurt. I decided to continue reading the book, but the remainder seemed hollow, and I realized that a lot of the charm of the book is in its sense of "chumminess" between the author and the reader, and after the subtle fat joke, that bond seemed broken. ( )
  lyssrose | Sep 28, 2005 |
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She was too busy to keep a diary. Luckily, AmEx kept one for her. From comedian Amy Borkowsky comes a hilarious collection about how she-quite literally-spent her early years as a single career woman. After digging out several dust-covered boxes from the back of her closet, Amy discovered twelve years' worth of credit card statements, documenting, in their own way, every significant event in her life. They show that on July 12, 1993, Amy spent $189.12 at Victoria's Secret, and that on July 14 she returned the entire purchase-evidence of a relationship that suddenly unraveled, right before The Lingerie Phase. The $601.76 she spent at Ann Taylor reminds her of her quest to find a suit that would cover not only her torso but also her career-related insecurities, and a $30.25 charge for her first Caller ID box recalls her first fruitless attempts to block out her interfering mother. Every purchase tells a story, and this wickedly funny account relates Amy's search for what every young woman is really shopping for in life: love, success, and independence.

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