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The Taming of the Shrew

by William Shakespeare

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7,79478926 (3.72)287
Shakespeare, who clearly preferred his women characters to his men (always excepting Falstaff and Hamlet), enlarges the human from the start, by subtly suggesting that women have the truer sense of reality.
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» See also 287 mentions

English (70)  Dutch (2)  Spanish (2)  Swedish (1)  French (1)  Catalan (1)  Arabic (1)  All languages (78)
Showing 1-5 of 70 (next | show all)
The play describes the volatile courtship between the shrewish Katharina (Kate) and the canny Petruchio, who is determined to subdue Katharina’s legendary temper and win her dowry. The main story is offered as a play within a play; the frame plot consists of an initial two-scene “induction” in which a whimsical lord decides to play a practical joke on a drunken tinker, Christopher Sly, by inducing him to believe that he is in fact a nobleman who has suffered from amnesia and is only now awaking from it. The main body of the play is presented to Sly as an entertainment for his delectation. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Jan 24, 2022 |
Not bad, for a classic. Full of the usual Shakespearean enigmas, in terms of social commentary. ( )
  et.carole | Jan 21, 2022 |
I love the story and of the many adaptions aside from this the original text, my favorite movie version is 10 Things I Hate About You. Every time I watch it I miss Heath Ledger, because I liked him better in this role then Richard Burton. My second favorite version was McLintock with John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara. ( )
  kevn57 | Dec 8, 2021 |
Hilarious -- excited to see a production. ( )
  poirotketchup | Mar 18, 2021 |
Definitely not one of my favorites ( )
  RuaBeansidhe | Jan 12, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 70 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (162 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
William Shakespeareprimary authorall editionscalculated
Baudissin, Wolf Heinrich GrafTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bergin, Thomas GoddardEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bevington, David M.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Díaz-Plaja, AuroraAdaptersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fergusson, FrancisEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gollancz, IsrealPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Harrison, George BEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Heilman, Robert BechtoldEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hodgdon, BarbaraEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jervis, Gerald C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kidnie, M.J.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Oliver, Harold JamesEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Papp, JosephForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Quiller-Couch, ArthurEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Raffel, BurtonEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thompson, AnnEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Webster, MargaretContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wright, Louis B.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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People/Characters
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Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Tranio, since for the great desire I had
To see fair Padua, nursery of arts,
I am arrived for fruitful Lombardy,
The pleasant garden of great Italy;
And by my father's love and leave am arm'd
With his good will and thy good company,
My trusty servant, well approved in all,
Here let us breathe and haply institute
A course of learning and ingenious studies.
Sly. I’ll pheeze you, in faith.
Hostess. A pair of stocks, you rogue!
Sly. Y’are a baggage; the Slys are no rogues. Look in the
chronicles: we came in with Richard Conqueror.
Therefore, paucas pallabris; let the world slide. Sessa!
Quotations
He that runs fastest gets the ring.
Signior Hortensio, 'twixt such friends as we
Few words suffice; and therefore, if thou know
One rich enough to be Petruchio's wife,
As wealth is burden of my wooing dance,
Be she as foul as was Florentius' love,
As old as Sibyl and as curst and shrewd
As Socrates' Xanthippe, or a worse,
She moves me not, or not removes, at least,
Affection's edge in me, were she as rough
As are the swelling Adriatic seas:
I come to wive it wealthily in Padua;
If wealthily, then happily in Padua.
Think you a little din can daunt mine ears?
Have I not in my time heard lions roar?
Have I not heard the sea puff'd up with winds
Rage like an angry boar chafed with sweat?
Have I not heard great ordnance in the field,
And heaven's artillery thunder in the skies?
Have I not in a pitched battle heard
Loud 'larums, neighing steeds, and trumpets' clang?
And do you tell me of a woman's tongue,
That gives not half so great a blow to hear
As will a chestnut in a farmer's fire?
Tush, tush! fear boys with bugs.
Father, and wife, and gentlemen, adieu;
I will to Venice; Sunday comes apace:
We will have rings and things and fine array;
And kiss me, Kate, we will be married o'Sunday.
Why, Petruchio is coming in a new hat and an old
jerkin, a pair of old breeches thrice turned, a pair
of boots that have been candle-cases, one buckled,
another laced, an old rusty sword ta'en out of the
town-armory, with a broken hilt, and chapeless;
with two broken points: his horse hipped with an
old mothy saddle and stirrups of no kindred;
besides, possessed with the glanders and like to mose
in the chine; troubled with the lampass, infected
with the fashions, full of wingdalls, sped with
spavins, rayed with yellows, past cure of the fives,
stark spoiled with the staggers, begnawn with the
bots, swayed in the back and shoulder-shotten;
near-legged before and with, a half-chequed bit
and a head-stall of sheeps leather which, being
restrained to keep him from stumbling, hath been
often burst and now repaired with knots; one girth
six time pieced and a woman's crupper of velure,
which hath two letters for her name fairly set down
in studs, and here and there pieced with packthread.
Last words
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Disambiguation notice
This work is for the complete The Taming of the Shrew only. Do not combine this work with abridgements, adaptations or simplifications (such as "Shakespeare Made Easy"), Cliffs Notes or similar study guides, or anything else that does not contain the full text. Do not include any video recordings. Additionally, do not combine this with other plays.
Publisher's editors
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Canonical LCC
Shakespeare, who clearly preferred his women characters to his men (always excepting Falstaff and Hamlet), enlarges the human from the start, by subtly suggesting that women have the truer sense of reality.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
A father decrees that his younger daughter may not marry before the elder is married off; however, Katherine is a true shrew, not interested in any man. Several suitors connive to approach the younger, and they enlist Petruchio to marry the elder daughter so that the way would be clear for them. Petruchio indulges in the most abominable way, bullying Kate into a marriage ceremony where he replies for her, whisks her away, and proceeds to deprive her while seeming to be demanding nothing but the best for her. At length, she relents. In the last scene, a wager for who has the most obedient wife is made -- and Kate, while obeying Petruchio, is actually asserting her own skills, wins the wager.
Haiku summary
Brilliant comedy,
A battle of the sexes,
Is Kate truly tamed?
(hillaryrose7)

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Penguin Australia

3 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140714510, 0451526791, 0141015519

Yale University Press

An edition of this book was published by Yale University Press.

» Publisher information page

Sourcebooks MediaFusion

An edition of this book was published by Sourcebooks MediaFusion.

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