HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Zorgamazoo by Robert Paul Weston
Loading...

Zorgamazoo

by Robert Paul Weston

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2712359,535 (4.28)7
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 7 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
My feverish daughter is taking her cure by listening to me read this Seussian rhyme aloud. Unlike Seuss, however, Weston does not limit himself to 115 words. Consequently, the seemingly easy format, the fantasy/adventure-filled plot, and clever typesetting are laced with lovely language, demanding that the reader sit up and pay attention.

Here's a quick sample from p. 116:

"She came through the trees before coming to stop
on the rim of a cliff, near a treacherous drop.
She stood there a moment, perched out on the ledge,
on the verge of the mountain's most calamitous edge."

I can see giving this book to Intermediates, especially those who would benefit from the propulsion of the rhyme to help muscle them through some of the more demanding language. Other readers would also just enjoy the slightly dangerous story as well as the artful word choice that allows for the protracted rhyme--sort of Roald Dahl's and Sr. Seuss's love child. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
My feverish daughter is taking her cure by listening to me read this Seussian rhyme aloud. Unlike Seuss, however, Weston does not limit himself to 115 words. Consequently, the seemingly easy format, the fantasy/adventure-filled plot, and clever typesetting are laced with lovely language, demanding that the reader sit up and pay attention.

Here's a quick sample from p. 116:

"She came through the trees before coming to stop
on the rim of a cliff, near a treacherous drop.
She stood there a moment, perched out on the ledge,
on the verge of the mountain's most calamitous edge."

I can see giving this book to Intermediates, especially those who would benefit from the propulsion of the rhyme to help muscle them through some of the more demanding language. Other readers would also just enjoy the slightly dangerous story as well as the artful word choice that allows for the protracted rhyme--sort of Roald Dahl's and Sr. Seuss's love child. ( )
  msmilton | Jul 18, 2018 |
A very cute dr seuss-like read. It was super quick too!! ( )
  pickleroad | Nov 10, 2016 |
When I started this book it was fun to read the Dr. Seuss-like rhymes, then it was annoying, then I just enjoyed the story. I've tried to recommend this book to students but they can't get past the annoying rhyming to enjoy the story. I would encourage teachers to try to use this book as a read aloud - thus a captive audience that might just learn to enjoy the story beyond the rhyming verse.
  Tracie_Shepherd | Apr 2, 2016 |
Normally, I'm not into Dr. Suess type books. This one was extremely playful and makes a great read aloud. It even worked well on the Kindle as there are a few pictures to go with the tale which when they appear are timed well and funny. ( )
  RalphLagana | Jan 23, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Here is a story that's stranger than strange.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
(from the back) Katrina Katrell is a girl with a big heart and an even bigger imagination. Too bad her guardian, Mrs. "Krabby" Krabone will have none of it! When Katrina spots a shadowy figure lurking in a subway tunnel, Old Krabby decides the child must be mad, and invites the quack brain surgeon Dr. LeFang for a midnight house call...
But Katrina, of course, is thoroughly sane. (Old Krabby's the one who's lame in the brain!) The figure she spotted was Morty the zorgle, and he's on a quest to find the missing zorgles of Zorgamazoo! There they discover that someone--or something-- has kidnapped all of the Earth's most magical creatures!
Join Morty and Katrina as they journey from the Earth to the Moon on a magical rhyming adventure full of griffins, ogres, and sphinxes, and more (and creatures you've never heard of before!)
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

Imaginative and adventurous Katrina eludes her maniacal guardian to help Morty, a member of a vanishing breed of zorgles, with his quest to uncover the fate of the fabled zorgles of Zorgmazoo as well as of other creatures that seem to have disappeared from the earth.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.28)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 8
3.5 1
4 21
4.5 4
5 22

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,013,434 books! | Top bar: Always visible