HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World (1985)

by Haruki Murakami

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
9,033186736 (4.13)1 / 324
The last surviving victim of an experiment that implanted the subjects' heads with electrodes that decipher coded messages is the unnamed narrator. Half the chapters are set in Tokyo, where the narrator negotiates underground worlds populated by INKlings, dodges opponents of both sides of a raging high-tech infowar, and engages in an affair with a beautiful librarian with a gargantuan appetite. In alternating chapters he tries to reunite with his mind and his shadow, from which he has been severed by the grim, dark "replacement" consciousness implanted in him by a dotty neurophysiologist. Both worlds share the unearthly theme of unicorn skulls that moan and glow.… (more)
  1. 20
    The Castle by Franz Kafka (alzo)
  2. 10
    Haibane Renmei: The Complete Series by Tomokazu Tokoro (Jannes)
    Jannes: Different mediums, but there are several interesting connections between the two works. Most prominently the isolated, walled in town. Worth checking out one if you liked the other.
  3. 10
    Kangaroo Notebook by Kōbō Abe (moietmoi)
  4. 00
    The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall (Rynooo)
  5. 00
    Mobius Dick by Andrew Crumey (alzo)
  6. 00
    The Affirmation by Christopher Priest (tetrachromat)
  7. 01
    Dogra Magra by Kyūsaku Yumeno (moietmoi)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

» See also 324 mentions

English (164)  French (7)  Spanish (4)  Dutch (3)  German (3)  Italian (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (183)
Showing 1-5 of 164 (next | show all)
Der Held lebt in sich selbst, kämpft sich durch Tokyo und wird am Ende "Endlich Nichdenker".
Gnostik und Jung treffen auf Blade Runner.

http://www.zeit.de/2006/18/L-Murakami1 ( )
  chepedaja3527 | Aug 23, 2022 |
oh, man.

i think this is the most structurally perfect novel of his that i've read, and it kind of stunned me. he used every part of the unicorn here. whoah. ( )
  J.Flux | Aug 13, 2022 |
I wanted to read this partially b/c I'm so ignorant about Japanese literature. I've listened to alotof Japanese music, witnessed at least a few Japanese films, & read ONE Japanese author (that I can remember at the moment, at least). So what do I choose? A Japanese author who barely references Japanese culture at all! Instead there're references to US culture, Russian culture, etc.. John Ford westerns!

What makes this particularly 'weird' for me is that I've only recently become reinterested in Ford & have actually checked out 2 of the movies that Murakami refers to. Maybe that's not so weird, plenty of people have seen these movies. But then Murakami also references Duke Ellington (who I heard live in the early 1970s), Turgenev (who I've read) - that sort of thing. Sure, these are all fairly mainstream 'western' references but reading them in a Japanese author makes me imagine the writer holed up in some apartment or house somewhere absorbing international culture like a sponge.. like me.

ANYWAY, when I 1st started reading this, it was too much like Kafka or Blanchot - or, more recently, Auster or Lethem. The structure is the classic pulp thing of having alternating threads in alternating chapters that start out so different that one wonders how they cd possibly be connected - & then gradually connecting them. & he[?:]'s good at it - b/c these 2 threads are sortof sci-fi/pulp-cyber-mystery intercut w/ fantasy. Those 2 might seem to be the same to many people but to me they're quite different.

So it grew on me. & grew. & stayed weird w/ how personal it was for me. references to reading Camus' "L'Etranger" in high school. Did Murakami read THAT in high school? Like I did? People always compared me to the main character. Small world. Of course, whenever I think of small world I think of BIG IMPERIALISM & the homogenization of culture. But, still, the relationship between the US, eg, & Japan isn't just so simple as the US bombing Japan into oblivion at the end of so-called WWII & the Japanese being duly obsequious afterward. After all, Japan was probably an even more arrogant imperialist culture at the time than the US was. Let's not forget the "Rape of Nanking", shall we? There's a reason why the Philippines embraced the US & hated the Japanese (if that's true). Whatever, I stray.

I liked this. The writing (or the translation, perhaps?) isn't exactly Nabokov but it whips right along like the pulp that obviously inspired it. &, SHIT!, there's even a part on pp284-285 THAT SAYS SOMETHING THAT I SAID IN MY 1ST BOOK PUBLISHED IN 1977. & that blew my mind. Of course, Murakami has never heard of me or read that book.. STILL, it was weird reading that section - it was almost as if I wrote it. YES, this was a good, fun read for me. I'll read more by Murakami. But I'm still looking for a Japanese author that teaches me more about Japanese culture. I'm still ignorant. ( )
  tENTATIVELY | Apr 3, 2022 |
This was one of the last Murakami books I had left to read as I read through all his works. I'm not sure if I'm disappointed I didn't read it earlier or glad to have had it to enjoy near the end. In some ways this was very different from the rest of his books. Usually his books contain small elements of "unreality" (for lack of a better word), but this book didn't really have anything set in the real world although one part was clearly closer to the real world than the other. But of course, the people were all real enough, which is one thing I need to have in any non reality-based story. I would say, like a lot of good plot writers, Murakami is not necessarily an ending writer, so I can't say I understood or was particularly satisfied by the ending, but I didn't really expect to be. His books are journey rather than destination, and the journey is almost never disappointing! ( )
  knerd.knitter | Feb 24, 2022 |
20
  revirier | Dec 13, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 164 (next | show all)
He has become the foremost representatives of a new style of Japanese writing: hip, cynical and highly stylized, set at the juncture of cyberpunk, postmodernism, and hard-boiled detective fiction.... Murakami [is] adept at deadpan wit, outrageous style.
added by GYKM | editLos Angeles Times Magazine
 
Murakami's bold willingness to go straight over the top [is] a signal indication of his genius... a world-class writer who has both eyes open and takes big risks.
added by GYKM | editWashington Post Book World
 

» Add other authors (19 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Haruki Murakamiprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bar, NomaCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Birnbaum, AlfredTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Camp, Marion Op denTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dean, SuzanneDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gall, JohnCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ortmanns, AnnelieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Porta, LourdesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stalph, JürgenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Winter, Maxim deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Why does the sun go on shining?
Why do the birds go on singing?
Don't they know it's the end of the world?

The End of the World (Sylvia Dee/Arthur Kent)
Dedication
First words
The elevator continued its impossibly slow ascent.
Elevatoren var på vej op i ekstremt langosmt tempo. Eller det forestillede jeg mig i det mindste. Jeg var ikke sikker. Det gik så langsomt, at jeg havde mistet orienteringen. Det kunne lige så godt være, at den var på vej ned, eller at den slet ikke bevægede sig.
Quotations
But on the phenomenological level, this world is only one out of countless possibillities. As you create memories, you're creatin' a parallel world
...I walked right into her backside. It was wonderfully cushioning, like a firm rain cloud.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

The last surviving victim of an experiment that implanted the subjects' heads with electrodes that decipher coded messages is the unnamed narrator. Half the chapters are set in Tokyo, where the narrator negotiates underground worlds populated by INKlings, dodges opponents of both sides of a raging high-tech infowar, and engages in an affair with a beautiful librarian with a gargantuan appetite. In alternating chapters he tries to reunite with his mind and his shadow, from which he has been severed by the grim, dark "replacement" consciousness implanted in him by a dotty neurophysiologist. Both worlds share the unearthly theme of unicorn skulls that moan and glow.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
From Library Journal
The last surviving victim of an experiment that implanted the subjects' heads with electrodes that decipher coded messages is the unnamed narrator of this excellent book by Murakami, one of Japan's best-selling novelists and winner of the prestigious Tanizaki prize. Half the chapters are set in Tokyo, where the narrator negotiates underground worlds populated by INKlings, dodges opponents of both sides of a raging high-tech infowar, and engages in an affair with a beautiful librarian with a gargantuan appetite. In alternating chapters he tries to reunite with his mind and his shadow, from which he has been severed by the grim, dark "replacement" consciousness implanted in him by a dotty neurophysiologist. Both worlds share the unearthly theme of unicorn skulls that moan and glow. Murakami's fast-paced style, full of hip internationalism, slangy allegory, and intrigue, has been adroitly translated. Murakami is also author of A Wild Sheep Chase ( LJ 10/15/89); his new work is recommended for academic libraries and public libraries emphasizing serious contemporary fiction.
- D.E. Perushek, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville
Haiku summary
Birds fly overhead
Golden beasts graze in the town
INKlings worship... fish?

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.13)
0.5 2
1 21
1.5 8
2 68
2.5 24
3 339
3.5 136
4 886
4.5 140
5 917

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 177,283,514 books! | Top bar: Always visible