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Mindstorms: Children, Computers, And Powerful Ideas (1990)

by Seymour Papert

Other authors: John Sculley (Introduction)

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520440,253 (4.3)3
The book that started the computer revolution in schools Computers have completely changed the way we teach children. We have Mindstorms to thank for that. In this book, pioneering computer scientist Seymour Papert uses the invention of LOGO, the first child-friendly programming language, to make the case for the value of teaching children with computers. Papert argues that children are more than capable of mastering computers, and that teaching computational processes like de-bugging in the classroom can change the way we learn everything else. He also shows that schools saturated with technology can actually improve socialization and interaction among students and between students and teachers. Technology changes every day, but the basic ways that computers can help us learn remain. For thousands of teachers and parents who have sought creative ways to help children learn with computers, Mindstorms is their bible.… (more)
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Showing 4 of 4
This book has some five star parts and some four star parts.

The five star parts are where Papert gets into the philosophy that drove the creation of LOGO - his thoughts about how learning occurs, why it's important to empower children to think about their own thinking, and his vision for a "learning society." It reads like a manifesto and goes so much past "hey, let's put computers in schools, it'll be great." He also showed me the power of thinking about environments as sources of "raw materials" for learning. There's certainly a lot more to chew on in these parts, and I need to think more and read it again.

The four star parts, for me, are anecdotes about how LOGO works towards reaching his goals. They're fun but not so inspirational. ( )
  haagen_daz | Jun 6, 2019 |
After reading the intro, you'll think this was written in 2010 - not 1980! Why and how did these ideas get lost? Why don't school incorporate these ideas as we launch computer science to all US schools? "Why?," I ask.
  open-leadership | Jan 24, 2018 |
Interesting ideas about how computers could be used to help children learn math the way they learn to speak. Computers "speak" math natively, and also provide models for thinking about thinking. ( )
  mbrubeck | Apr 10, 2007 |
Showing 4 of 4
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Seymour Papertprimary authorall editionscalculated
Sculley, JohnIntroductionsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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The book that started the computer revolution in schools Computers have completely changed the way we teach children. We have Mindstorms to thank for that. In this book, pioneering computer scientist Seymour Papert uses the invention of LOGO, the first child-friendly programming language, to make the case for the value of teaching children with computers. Papert argues that children are more than capable of mastering computers, and that teaching computational processes like de-bugging in the classroom can change the way we learn everything else. He also shows that schools saturated with technology can actually improve socialization and interaction among students and between students and teachers. Technology changes every day, but the basic ways that computers can help us learn remain. For thousands of teachers and parents who have sought creative ways to help children learn with computers, Mindstorms is their bible.

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