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Dreaming in Cuban (1992)

by Cristina García

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1,3662810,991 (3.6)35
A vivid and funny first novel about three generations of a Cuban family divided by conflicting loyalties over the Cuban revolution, set in the world of Havana in the 1970s and '80s and in an emigre neighborhood of Brooklyn. It is a story of immense charm about women and politics, women and witchcraft, women and their men.… (more)
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English (25)  Dutch (2)  Spanish (1)  All languages (28)
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
Beautifully written with vivid and interesting characters. ( )
  Chrissylou62 | Aug 1, 2020 |
i liked this but i did feel lost a lot of the time, mostly at the end. (which i think was intentional on some level, but i wasn't really a fan.) i almost should have anticipated that: this is a novel where many of the characters are at some point in the novel lost in a manic episode. and that is a structure that holds throughout the novel - all of the characters dabble in some sort of fantasy, whether it is celia's love letters, utterly removed from the everyday but still possible, felicia's religious devotion (not that santeria is in itself manic but even the other santeros are worried by the summer of coconuts), or lourdes' conversations with her dead father. it's a book about the extreme, and accordingly centres itself on mania. ( )
  livingtoast | Jan 23, 2019 |
Beautifully written, if a bit heavy with the flowery and dreamy descriptions at times. But even those don't seem out of place when you're talking about that colorful, bright part of the world. I didn't feel this was so much a story about politics as it was a story about families and relationships within families: fathers and daughters; mothers and sons; daughters and mothers. About holding on to dreams, living out your passions. The context of the Cuban culture and revolution offers a unique, interesting and touching perspective. I didn't rate it higher because I was hoping for something a little more historical. ( )
  catzkc | Mar 23, 2018 |
" I become convinced that you have to live in the world to say anything meaningful about it."

"One thing hasn't changed: the men are still in charge. Fixing that is going to take a lot longer than twenty years."

"...the most accidental gestures can lead to precise conclusions."

This story centers around four women; Celia, Lourdes, Felicia, and Pilar. Their heartbreaks, their past, their desires, their endless search for meaning and belonging. It takes a really good author to be able to change narratives and have the story flow seamlessly.
I can't believe I didn't stumble upon this author sooner but I am looking forward to reading her other works. ( )
  emjmace | Oct 19, 2017 |
This novel moves between Cuba and the United States featuring three generations of a single family. The novel focuses particularly on the females—Celia del Pino, her daughters Lourdes and Felicia, and her granddaughter Pilar. While most of the novel is written in the third person, some sections are written in the first person, and letters are also included. The novel is not told in linear fashion; it moves between characters and jumps in time.
The novel’s central themes include family relationships, exile, the divisiveness of politics, and memory. Cuban history and culture are important in the novel, including important historical events and the elements of Santería that appear throughout the novel.

I enjoyed this novel because for me specifically, growing up Cuban, there were many things that were familiar in the telling of this story. What I didn't like about the book (and what I don't like about books that do this) is the flip flopping back and forth between both Characters and Time. I have difficulty reading stories like that.

That being said, this book is a worthy read. ( )
  DVerdecia | Jan 29, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
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A vivid and funny first novel about three generations of a Cuban family divided by conflicting loyalties over the Cuban revolution, set in the world of Havana in the 1970s and '80s and in an emigre neighborhood of Brooklyn. It is a story of immense charm about women and politics, women and witchcraft, women and their men.

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