HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Drown

by Junot Díaz

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,276394,991 (3.81)90
"This stunning collection of stories offers an unsentimental glimpse of life among the immigrants from the Dominican Republic-and other front-line reports on the ambivalent promise of the American dream-by an eloquent and original writer who describes more than physical dislocation in conveying the price that is paid forleaving culture and homeland behind."--San Francisco Chronicle. Junot Diaz's stories are as vibrant, tough, unexotic, and beautiful as their settings-Santa Domingo, Dominican. Neuva York, the immigrant neighborhoods of industrial New Jersey with their gorgeously polluted skyscapes. Places and voices new to our literature yet classically American: coming-of-age stories full of wild humor, intelligence, rage, and piercing tenderness. And this is just the beginning. Diaz is going to be a giant of American prose.-Francisco Goldman. Ever since Diaz began publishing short stories in venues as prestigious as The New Yorker, he has been touted as a major new talent, and his debut collection affirms this claim. Born and raised in Santo Domingo, Diaz uses the contrast between his island homeland and life in New York City and New Jersey as a fulcrum for his trenchant tales. His young male narrators are teetering into precarious adolescence. For these sons of harsh or absent fathers and bone-weary, stoic mothers, life is an unrelenting hustle. In Santo Domingo, they are sent to stay with relatives when the food runs out at home; in the States, shoplifting and drugdealing supply material necessities and a bit ofa thrill in an otherwise exhausting and frustrating existence. There is little affection, sex is destructive, conversation strained, and even the brilliant beauty of a sunset is tainted, its colors the product of pollutants. Keep your eye onDiaz; his first novel is on the way.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 90 mentions

English (38)  Danish (1)  All languages (39)
Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
Denna bok gav mig en chans att läsa och se Latinamerika på ett nytt, råare sätt. ( )
  autisticluke | Nov 14, 2019 |
4.3 A wonderful first book full of what I like about Diaz. That is, a forceful, singular voice for the US-DR diaspora. There is nothing not to like. Worth it if you read [b: Oscar Wao|6979989|The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao|Junot Díaz|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1255571634s/6979989.jpg|3281466] first and want more. ( )
  Eoin | Jun 3, 2019 |
It's not entirely clear if this collection of short stories is narrated by the same character, Yunior, or not. Yunior appears in Diaz's later book The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, and it seems unlikely that the Yunior of Brief and Wondrous Life who goes to Rutgers is really the same Yunior who seemingly spends years committing petty theft, dealing and doing drugs, and accumulating abusive/abused girlfriends. Since I know that Diaz likes to write about the character, I'm going to assume an infinity of alternate universe Yuniors.

The best parts are the parts about Yunior's childhood, first growing up in poverty in the Dominican Republic, and then in the Washington Heights in New York. The story about Yunior's father, who is a narcissistic jerk but wonderfully human, is truly incredible. Less successful are the stories of adult Yunior, which tend to blend together after a while in their sameness.

This anthology won't have quite the same kick if you haven't read The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, which was the third book I've ever thrown across the room (the first being the fifth Harry Potter book when Sirius died, and the second being A Case of Exploding Mangos, which everyone should also read). It's a funny, witty, touching book chock-full of fantasy and sci-fi references, and if sheds more insight on Yunior and where he will end up eventually. ( )
  miri12 | May 31, 2019 |
These stories are compiled in such a way that reading them had that beautiful lyrical quality of a dream, while still continually bashing into the poignant harsh realities of poverty and abuse. ( )
  JeanneBlasberg | Apr 30, 2019 |
I enjoyed immersing myself in the waters of Drown. An emotional collection of stories, one can surmise they are at least partly based on Diaz's personal experiences. The stories explore often ignored themes of masculinity, male friendship, and (most importantly) father-son relationships. In fact, there is a Kafka-esque search to comprehend a father's identity and actions. It is not an easy task with a father who is emotionally and, for a large part, physically distant. Women are present, of course, but usually found in beleaguered and lamentable circumstances. They are deficient in money and in the love that they seem to deserve. The young male protagonists want to be exceptional men to their female lovers, but suspect that inevitably they too will become neglectful. No one is safe from emotional turmoil in Diaz's stories. The struggles are private, familial and cultural---not individual but all interconnected. Isn't this always the case? ( )
  oacevedo | Apr 9, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 38 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (7 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Díaz, Junotprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bragg, BillCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
The fact that I
am writing to you
in English
already falsifies what i
wanted to tell you.
My subject:
how to explain to you that I
don't belong to English
though I belong nowhere else

Gustavo Perez Firmat
Dedication
Para mi madre,

Virtudes Díaz
First words
We are on our way to the colmado for an errand, a beer for my tío, when Rafa stood still and tilted his head, as if listening to a message I couldn't hear, something beamed in from afar.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

"This stunning collection of stories offers an unsentimental glimpse of life among the immigrants from the Dominican Republic-and other front-line reports on the ambivalent promise of the American dream-by an eloquent and original writer who describes more than physical dislocation in conveying the price that is paid forleaving culture and homeland behind."--San Francisco Chronicle. Junot Diaz's stories are as vibrant, tough, unexotic, and beautiful as their settings-Santa Domingo, Dominican. Neuva York, the immigrant neighborhoods of industrial New Jersey with their gorgeously polluted skyscapes. Places and voices new to our literature yet classically American: coming-of-age stories full of wild humor, intelligence, rage, and piercing tenderness. And this is just the beginning. Diaz is going to be a giant of American prose.-Francisco Goldman. Ever since Diaz began publishing short stories in venues as prestigious as The New Yorker, he has been touted as a major new talent, and his debut collection affirms this claim. Born and raised in Santo Domingo, Diaz uses the contrast between his island homeland and life in New York City and New Jersey as a fulcrum for his trenchant tales. His young male narrators are teetering into precarious adolescence. For these sons of harsh or absent fathers and bone-weary, stoic mothers, life is an unrelenting hustle. In Santo Domingo, they are sent to stay with relatives when the food runs out at home; in the States, shoplifting and drugdealing supply material necessities and a bit ofa thrill in an otherwise exhausting and frustrating existence. There is little affection, sex is destructive, conversation strained, and even the brilliant beauty of a sunset is tainted, its colors the product of pollutants. Keep your eye onDiaz; his first novel is on the way.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.81)
0.5
1 3
1.5 4
2 29
2.5 9
3 103
3.5 33
4 195
4.5 29
5 100

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 157,901,129 books! | Top bar: Always visible