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Sir Harry Hotspur of Humblethwaite (1871)

by Anthony Trollope

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297873,373 (3.43)23
Since its first appearance in 1870, this has been regarded as one of Trollope's finest short novels. Trollope describes the vacillations of a conscientious father, torn between the desire to marry his daughter to a cousin destined to inherit the family title, and his fear that the cousin, reportedly a scheming wastrel, is unworthy of her.… (more)
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    Lady Anna by Anthony Trollope (digifish_books)
    digifish_books: Another of Trollope's shorter novels which also deals with a daughter's betrothal plans which are fraught with danger.
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Satire about the (unsuccessful) attempt of a wealthy girl to reform her black sheep of a cousin so she could marry him.

Not Trollope's best but enjoyable enough. The character that I ended up sympathizing with most was the title character, Sir Harry. ( )
  leslie.98 | Mar 21, 2016 |
** spoiler alert ** Sir Harry Hotspur plans to leave his large fortune and estate to his only surviving child, Emily, but the title will be inherited by his cousin George. Harry considers the idea of Emily marrying George and thus keeping the title and estate together. However, there are questions as to George's character. Harry cannot decide what to do and in the meantime Emily and George get engaged, Emily intending that George should turn over a new leaf and be redeemed by her.

This short novel has a pretty simple plot and not a lot really happens. Harry dithers, refuses to tell Emily the details of George's bad conduct, with the result that she believes him merely to be extravagant, whereas in fact he is dishonest and a cheat, with no firm intention ever to reform. The novel has its moments - I liked the way George got his women friends to write all his letters for him, thereby enabling Mrs Morton to ensure that his letter to Emily at the end is harsh and dismissive - but it was very one tone and a little repetitive. The ending was melodramatic, but perhaps for the best, since Emily was very annoying. ( )
  pgchuis | Nov 10, 2015 |
Damn good yarn as always with Trollope. The daughter is a frightful Madam refusing to change her mind once she's given her promise of betrothal to the caddish cousin george, Despite his caddishness being revealed. Funniest scenes are when George has a few moments with her as engaged couple and finds the idea of life with this stiff high-principled lady might not be such fun after all. Strange from a modern perspective are several things: Sir Harry's concern for the family name as opposed to the individuals involved, his not giving the evidence of Geo's wrongdoing to his daughter - he wants desperately to convince her but doesn't give his reasons (one wonders if Trollope is being ironically aware, but i think not); the irrevocable aspect of daughter's promise seems suspiciously sexual with much talk of "giving herself", has she actually been seduced by George? The scenes with Geo's mistress are very convincing though she's never called by sic a name, we know whats going on there. the low life scenes with moneylenders are convincing too though the constant reference to one as "the jew" are uncomfortable in a modern light. ( )
  vguy | Apr 28, 2014 |
Sir Harry loses his son and a cousin will inherit the baronetcy. He hopes to unite land and title by wedding his daughter to cousin. However, cousin George prove unfit, but not until Lisa has already given her heart to him.
  ritaer | Mar 9, 2014 |
Of the half dozen Trollope novels I've read, this is the third which follows the same plot. Heiress chooses to marry a rogue, complications follow. ( )
  elimatta | Nov 5, 2013 |
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Sir Harry Hotspur of Humblethwaite was a mighty person in Cumberland, and one who well understood of what nature were the duties, and of what sort the magnificence, which his position as a great English commoner required of him.
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Since its first appearance in 1870, this has been regarded as one of Trollope's finest short novels. Trollope describes the vacillations of a conscientious father, torn between the desire to marry his daughter to a cousin destined to inherit the family title, and his fear that the cousin, reportedly a scheming wastrel, is unworthy of her.

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