HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Last Evenings On Earth

by Roberto Bolaño

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7361825,838 (3.92)23
"The melancholy folklore of exile," as Roberto Bolano once put it, pervades these fourteen haunting stories. Bolano's narrators are usually writers grappling with private (and generally unlucky) quests, who typically speak in the first person, as if giving a deposition, like witnesses to a crime. These protagonists tend to take detours and to narrate unresolved efforts. They are characters living in the margins, often coming to pieces, and sometimes, as in a nightmare, in constant flight from something horrid. In the short story "Silva the Eye," Bolano writes in the opening sentence: "It's strange how things happen, Mauricio Silva, known as The Eye, always tried to escape violence, even at the risk of being considered a coward, but the violence, the real violence, can't be escaped, at least not by us, born in Latin America in the 1950s, those of us who were around 20 years old when Salvador Allende died." Set in the Chilean exile diaspora of Latin America and Europe, and peopled by Bolano's beloved "failed generation," the stories ofLast Evenings on Earth have appeared inThe New Yorker andGrand Street.… (more)
  1. 00
    The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov by Vladimir Nabokov (lobotomy42)
  2. 00
    By Night in Chile by Roberto Bolaño (parrishlantern)
    parrishlantern: Whilst reading this, a certain song refrain kept intruding into my thoughts, after a while I paid closer attention to it, and realised that it not only fitted this books subject matter, it sounded like some thing from a Bolano novel. Repent, Repent I wonder what they meant. “All your lousy little poets coming round, trying to sound like Charley Manson, see the white girl dancin” L.Cohen.… (more)
  3. 00
    Distant Star by Roberto Bolaño (inaudible)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 23 mentions

English (16)  Spanish (1)  All languages (17)
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
there are a few low-points in here, one of which is the character of anne moore in "anne moore's life" -- maybe she seemed to familiar to me, or too without a heart, or too ... american. i don't know. i wasn't interested. i also get frustrated when bolano lists poets and authors in torrential lists that it would take me days to get through. but aside from these points, which possibly only bothered me, this book is heartbreak and hope and despair and sunshine wrapped up in some vignettes that, if you ask me, could have gone on forever.
( )
  J.Flux | Aug 13, 2022 |
G. sits at his desk to write a review of the first Bolaño he's ever read. He thinks he liked it just fine, though it wasn't the best thing he's read. He wouldn't call Bolaño a "good writer" per se, but then again, G. isn't in a position to call anyone a "good" or a "bad" writer.

Okay, let's stop it with the imitation: I was surprised that Bolaño's style seemed so simple, like a summary of someone's life (one of the stories, Anne Moore's Life actually, is functionally a summary of a woman's life), unadorned, perhaps even--dare I say it--boring, with only rare glimmers of what I would call exciting writing.

So I don't know why I ended up being so engrossed in almost all the stories. Maybe it's because Bolaño writes great characters, all of them believable because, let's face it, almost all the stories seem like they were taken out of B's autobiof and were, therefore, real. Maybe it's because I got some voyeuristic rush out of the characters. In the end, I think it's both of those, combined with the fact that I didn't have to slog through excess verbiage and description to get to what I really look for in literature: the essence of relationships between human beings.

B really gets to the bone of such relationships. His main character interacts with a peripheral friend or someone close, and then the story ends, and the message I got out of most stories is that we really only have ourselves in the end. Nothing else.
( )
  Gadi_Cohen | Sep 22, 2021 |
Bolaño's short stories are really great. The only downside of this book for me is that it contains some of the stories from Putas Asesinas, which I had already read. So far this seems to be a better collection though. The stories are more engaging and the book is a good mix of what's best in Bolaño's work. The irony, the humor, the horror, the despair and sense of impending doom, it's all there. ( )
  andrenth | Sep 16, 2021 |
This is my first trip into Bolaño; I wasn't really prepared for this, what happened to me upon reading this book, but it was a mixed bag: a bit of ADHD, a bit of yanking my chain, but mainly, this was some exciting reading from a very talented writer.

When Paul was gone, Anne and Rubén shut themselves in the bungalow and spent three days in a row making love. Anne's money soon ran out and Rubén went back to selling drugs outside The Frog. Anne left the bungalow and went to live at Ruben's house in a suburb from which you couldn't see the ocean. The house belonged to Rubéns grandmother, who lived there with her eldest son, Ruben's uncle, an unmarried fisherman, about forty years old. Things soon took a turn for the worse. Ruben's grandmother didn't like the way Anne walked around the house half-naked. One afternoon, when Anne was in the bathroom, Ruben's uncle came in and propositioned her. He offered her money. Anne, of course, refused the offer, but not firmly enough (she didn't want to offend him, she remembers) and the next day Ruben's uncle offered her money again in return for her favors. Without realizing what she was about to unleash, Anne told Rubén. That night Rubén took a knife from the kitchen and tried to kill his uncle. The shouting was loud enough to wake the whole neighborhood, Anne remembers, but strangely nobody seemed to hear. Luckily, Ruben's uncle, who was a stronger and more experienced fighter, soon disarmed him. But Rubén wasn't about to give in, and threw a vase at his uncle's head. As bad luck would have it, just at that moment his grandmother was coming out of her room, wearing a very bright red nightgown, the likes of which Anne had never seen. Ruben's uncle dodged the vase and it struck his grandmother on the chest. The uncle gave Rubén a beating, then took his mother to hospital. When they returned, the uncle and the grandmother marched straight into the room where Anne and Rubén were sleeping and gave them two hours to get out of the house. Rubén had bruises all over his body and could hardly move, but he was so scared of his uncle that before the two hours were up, they had packed all their gear into the car.

It's a very good book at times, and at others, e.g. when Bolaño endlessly name-drops authors and books, it gets tedious as hell. At that point I wish he'd had an editor to rein him in a lot.

Some sentences, though, are just great:

One day Anne's love for Tony ran out and she left Seattle.

A lot goes on in very little time:

One night, while they were making love, Bill suggested they have a child. Anne's reply was brief and calm, she simply said no, she was still too young, but inside she could feel herself starting to scream, or rather, she could feel, and see, the dividing line between not screaming and screaming. It was like opening your eyes in a cave bigger than the Earth, Anne remembers. It was around then that she had a relapse and the doctors decided to operate again.

In total: a very worthy read. ( )
  pivic | Mar 21, 2020 |
There is something special about a Bolano short story, at least in this collection and The Insufferable Gaucho. I believe Bolano had the Hemingway iceberg theory down in these stories. Highly recommend. Good stuff. ( )
  MSarki | Mar 29, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 16 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Roberto Bolañoprimary authorall editionscalculated
Andrews, ChrisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Selected stories from other two collections: Llamadas telefónicas (Telephone calls) and Putas asesinas (Murdering whores). It should not be combined with either of those collections, or with The return, which consists of a different selection of stories from those same collections.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

"The melancholy folklore of exile," as Roberto Bolano once put it, pervades these fourteen haunting stories. Bolano's narrators are usually writers grappling with private (and generally unlucky) quests, who typically speak in the first person, as if giving a deposition, like witnesses to a crime. These protagonists tend to take detours and to narrate unresolved efforts. They are characters living in the margins, often coming to pieces, and sometimes, as in a nightmare, in constant flight from something horrid. In the short story "Silva the Eye," Bolano writes in the opening sentence: "It's strange how things happen, Mauricio Silva, known as The Eye, always tried to escape violence, even at the risk of being considered a coward, but the violence, the real violence, can't be escaped, at least not by us, born in Latin America in the 1950s, those of us who were around 20 years old when Salvador Allende died." Set in the Chilean exile diaspora of Latin America and Europe, and peopled by Bolano's beloved "failed generation," the stories ofLast Evenings on Earth have appeared inThe New Yorker andGrand Street.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.92)
0.5
1 2
1.5 2
2 5
2.5 4
3 22
3.5 15
4 62
4.5 15
5 36

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 177,132,265 books! | Top bar: Always visible