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Strings Attached by Judy Blundell
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Strings Attached

by Judy Blundell

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2903358,607 (3.99)19
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Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
I just couldn't force myself to read this book. Not sure if it was the setting for the book or what, but I had to force myself to even read the first 50 pages:( ( )
  chaoticbooklover | Dec 26, 2018 |
I can't really recommend this as a great read. It doesn't live up to the hype. I found out about it from a poster on the tube, which seemed to be aimed at 20-40 year old secretaries wishing for a better life.

So I expected something rags-to-riches ish: woman with boring ordinary job bags rich man. Like chick lit and romance with a slight tinge of mystery maybe.

However, this is nothing of the sort. It's about a 17 year old, which is not a great age to have me identify with. She's pretty and talented and a dancer, so not really in a position where she leads more luck. Then there's loads of mafia and crime stuff and death. It just doesn't sit right with me.

I wanted to stop reading but somehow I also wanted to know what would happen, and eventually something did. So it isn't badly written. Just generally wrong somehow. Whatever. If you want to read it, do. Just don't get your hopes up or expect anything good.

It's good that there is now a YA historical novel. I just wish it had been a far better one. ( )
  lydiasbooks | Jan 17, 2018 |
1950s in Manhattan and Providence, RI. Just as good as her other historical noir, What I Saw and How I Lied. Only complaint: because this book is marketed as young adult, I think the length has been too carefully considered. I mean, I think she cut it short and rushed the ending, for the sake of keeping the book shorter to appeal to a younger audience. ( )
  fromthecomfychair | Feb 11, 2016 |
Again I waited way too long to review a book. Gotta stop doing that. Kit Corrigan has left her family in Rhode Island and moved to New York to try and make it as a Broadway star. The show she's in is a flop and her money's running out fast when Nate Benedict, her ex boyfriend's father and a mob lawyer makes her a deal. Keep an eye on Billy (the ex) and do a couple of favors and she's got a new job and a new place. Billy joined the military along with Kit's brother, the night it all ended because of Billy's temper; but there is still a lot unresolved between Kit and Billy.

Kit is a great characters and I really loved looking at the world through her eyes. She's trying to figure out what to do and is unhappy with herself for taking the easy way out. She is a very strong girl but she doesn't see it yet. I was happy to watch her start to find her strength again at the end of the book.

The book goes back and forth between Kit's early childhood, when her and her brother and sister (they are triplets) were part of the Corrigan three; growing up with her aunt and her father and dance lessons; and the beginning of her relationship with Billy. Along the way we get Billy's history and her aunt and father's history as well.

The plot here is strong and interesting, the characters are extremely well developed, even the minor ones and I thoroughly enjoyed the book but there was one question it raised for me. At what point does a specific time period get relegated to historical fiction. The work takes place in the fifties (not the sock hop Leave it To Beaver, happy suburbia fifties but lives that are grittier and certainly feel more realistic), and while I wasn't alive yet some of my coworkers were. I've wondered about this a lot and have asked around. I find that the answer I tend to get depends on when the person I am talking to was born.

In the end it was more of a feeling that made me consider this book historical fiction. Everything in this book feels very old fashioned. From the descriptions of the more superficial things such as clothes, food and furniture to the more in depth such as social customs, class and behavior. Also the occasional trips to the forties and thirties to get background information on characters and their situations allowed me to rationalize my decision.

( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
Again I waited way too long to review a book. Gotta stop doing that. Kit Corrigan has left her family in Rhode Island and moved to New York to try and make it as a Broadway star. The show she's in is a flop and her money's running out fast when Nate Benedict, her ex boyfriend's father and a mob lawyer makes her a deal. Keep an eye on Billy (the ex) and do a couple of favors and she's got a new job and a new place. Billy joined the military along with Kit's brother, the night it all ended because of Billy's temper; but there is still a lot unresolved between Kit and Billy.

Kit is a great characters and I really loved looking at the world through her eyes. She's trying to figure out what to do and is unhappy with herself for taking the easy way out. She is a very strong girl but she doesn't see it yet. I was happy to watch her start to find her strength again at the end of the book.

The book goes back and forth between Kit's early childhood, when her and her brother and sister (they are triplets) were part of the Corrigan three; growing up with her aunt and her father and dance lessons; and the beginning of her relationship with Billy. Along the way we get Billy's history and her aunt and father's history as well.

The plot here is strong and interesting, the characters are extremely well developed, even the minor ones and I thoroughly enjoyed the book but there was one question it raised for me. At what point does a specific time period get relegated to historical fiction. The work takes place in the fifties (not the sock hop Leave it To Beaver, happy suburbia fifties but lives that are grittier and certainly feel more realistic), and while I wasn't alive yet some of my coworkers were. I've wondered about this a lot and have asked around. I find that the answer I tend to get depends on when the person I am talking to was born.

In the end it was more of a feeling that made me consider this book historical fiction. Everything in this book feels very old fashioned. From the descriptions of the more superficial things such as clothes, food and furniture to the more in depth such as social customs, class and behavior. Also the occasional trips to the forties and thirties to get background information on characters and their situations allowed me to rationalize my decision.

( )
  Rosa.Mill | Nov 21, 2015 |
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Epigraph
Dedication
For Neil
First words
The second act curtain was one chorus away when I spotted him.
Quotations
When a family breaks you don't hear the crack of the breaking. You don't hear a sound.
What would happen next, I didn't know, but I knew it would have to happen. I would make it happen. I was a motherless child, and I knew the deepest of tragedies was simple: to love, and not to be loved in return.
In those hot summers, full of flies and white skies, corn and pigs, I learned what America was -- people looking up from their work and trouble and hoping someone would tell them a story, sell them a dream. And I saw what it was like to be looked at, and came to like it.
I've heard people say about their childhoods during the hard times, We didn't know we were poor, and do you know what? They're lying.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0545221269, Hardcover)

From National Book Award winner Judy Blundell, the tale of a sixteen-year-old girl caught in a mix of love, mystery, Broadway glamour, and Mob retribution in 1950 New York.

When Kit Corrigan arrives in New York City, she doesn't have much. She's fled from her family in Providence, Rhode Island, and she's broken off her tempestuous relationship with a boy named Billy, who's enlisted in the army.

The city doesn't exactly welcome her with open arms. She gets a bit part as a chorus girl in a Broadway show, but she knows that's not going to last very long. She needs help--and then it comes, from an unexpected source.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:44 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

When she drops out of school and struggles to start a career on Broadway in the fall of 1950, seventeen-year-old Kit Corrigan accepts help from an old family friend, a lawyer said to have ties with the mob, who then asks her to do some favors for him.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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