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South Wind Through the Kitchen: The Best of Elizabeth David

by Elizabeth David

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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1853146,791 (4.15)2
Before Elizabeth David died in 1992 she and her editor, Jill Norman, had begun work on a volume of "The Best of" but then her health deteriorated and the project was shelved. The idea was revived in 1996 when chefs and writers and Elizabeth's many friends, were invited to select their favourite articles and recipes. Some sent notes explaining their choice, others provided an anecdote or a recollection about her, others sent lists of recipes they had been using for years. This book is the fruit of that harvest of recommendations and the names of the contributors, who number among them some of our finest food writers such as Simon Hopkinson, Alice Waters, Sally Clarke, Richard Olney, Paul Levy and Anne Willan, appear after the pieces they had chosen along with their notes. The extracts and recipes which make up "South Wind Through the Kitchen" are drawn from all Elizabeth David's books, namely "A Book of Mediterranean Food", "French Country Cooking", "Italian Food", "Sumer Cooking", "French Provincial Cooking", "Spices, Salt and Aromatics in the English Kitchen", "English Bread and Yeast Cookery", "An Omelette and a Glass of Wine", and "Harvest of the Cold Months". There are over 200 recipes in the book organised around courses and ingredients such as eggs and cheese, fish and shellfish, meat, poultry and game, vegetables, pasta, pulses and grains, sauces, sweet dishes and cakes, preserves, and bread, all interspersed with extracts and articles making it a delightful compendium to dip into as well as cook from.… (more)
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» See also 2 mentions

Showing 3 of 3
There is a warning in amongst the contributions to this lovely read, from Jackie Mallorca; “I find it is a great mistake to pick up any of Elizabeth David’s books unless you have an hour or so at your disposal, a comfortable chair and a pot of tea at your elbow. Her prose is seductive…”. For once I was sensible enough to leave this book – partially read – at home when we left on a recent vacation, as I knew that “seductive prose” would mean trouble, with strident complaints about having my ‘nose buried in a book even on our cruise’! As it was I finished a grand ‘life’ of Alec Guinness and an equally thrilling read on the dangers of the fishing. But I picked up this, my sixth work by this great chef and author as soon as we arrived home.

Each chapter of recipes, so tempting to cook from, is preceded by an essay in David’s delectable ‘voice’, authoritive, reasoned and witty.

If you have any interest in food and cooking, in her very early crusade for fresh, local and organic eating, in the selection of produce (and in her choice and advice on her “stores”) and have read any of her other great books, you probably already own this book. If not, get your hands on a copy for some stylish food-pornography with a strong and sensible message!

And what does it say about our modern culture that such such a hoard of wonderful recipes, a treasure of a book, is marked in my copy by the Poinciana Library System as DISCARDED?
  John_Vaughan | Sep 2, 2012 |
South Wind Through the Kitchen is a collection of Elizabeth David's best everything - best recipes, best essays, best foot forward (as the cover photograph implies) compiled by friends and family. It is a multi-personality publication, part cookbook, part leisure reading, part reference. Any one person can pick it up for a multitude of reasons, whether to graze lightly through its pages or gorge on them entirely. It's a great sampling of Elizabeth David's writing throughout her career. ( )
  SeriousGrace | Apr 9, 2010 |
Polenta, p.233, teaching a Southerner to make yellow grits.
  DromJohn | Mar 15, 2015 |
Showing 3 of 3
added by lquilter | editThe New Yorker, Julian Barnes (pay site) (Sep 21, 1998)
 

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Elizabeth Davidprimary authorall editionscalculated
Norman, JillianCompilersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Before Elizabeth David died in 1992 she and her editor, Jill Norman, had begun work on a volume of "The Best of" but then her health deteriorated and the project was shelved. The idea was revived in 1996 when chefs and writers and Elizabeth's many friends, were invited to select their favourite articles and recipes. Some sent notes explaining their choice, others provided an anecdote or a recollection about her, others sent lists of recipes they had been using for years. This book is the fruit of that harvest of recommendations and the names of the contributors, who number among them some of our finest food writers such as Simon Hopkinson, Alice Waters, Sally Clarke, Richard Olney, Paul Levy and Anne Willan, appear after the pieces they had chosen along with their notes. The extracts and recipes which make up "South Wind Through the Kitchen" are drawn from all Elizabeth David's books, namely "A Book of Mediterranean Food", "French Country Cooking", "Italian Food", "Sumer Cooking", "French Provincial Cooking", "Spices, Salt and Aromatics in the English Kitchen", "English Bread and Yeast Cookery", "An Omelette and a Glass of Wine", and "Harvest of the Cold Months". There are over 200 recipes in the book organised around courses and ingredients such as eggs and cheese, fish and shellfish, meat, poultry and game, vegetables, pasta, pulses and grains, sauces, sweet dishes and cakes, preserves, and bread, all interspersed with extracts and articles making it a delightful compendium to dip into as well as cook from.

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