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The Gallic War

by Julius Caesar

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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3,961462,509 (3.93)91
Caesar portrayed his invasion of Gaul as being a defensive pre-emptive action, most historians agree that the wars were fought primarily to boost Caesar's political career and to pay off his massive debts. Even so, Gaul was extremely important to Rome, as they had been attacked many times by the Gauls. Conquering Gaul allowed Rome to secure the natural border of the river Rhine. Caesar painstakingly describes his military campaign, and this is it is still the most important historical source on the Gaul campaign. It is also a masterwork of political propaganda, as Caesar was keenly interested in manipulating his readers in Rome as he published this book just as the Roman Civil war began. W. A. Macdevitt's translations brings this land mark historic book alive.… (more)
  1. 05
    Asterix and the Banquet by René Goscinny (Artymedon)
    Artymedon: The description of Gaul by this contemporary of Asterix will enlight the reader as to where Asterix' banquet takes place.
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» See also 91 mentions

English (34)  Spanish (4)  Dutch (3)  Italian (2)  French (2)  Catalan (1)  All languages (46)
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
Here we have One of the better known pieces of military history ever penned, and a common model of Latin composition. Like a good deal of military writing, the aims of the author, and his wish to maintain, if not establish his military reputation is clearly carried out. It reads, at least in this translation, easily. The mapping, as usual is not particularly good. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Jun 3, 2022 |
Julius Caesar's firsthand account of the Gallic Wars, written as a third-person narrative. In it Caesar describes the battles and intrigues that took place in the nine years he spent fighting the Celtic and Germanic peoples in Gaul that opposed Roman conquest.

The "Gaul" that Caesar refers to is ambiguous, as the term had various connotations in Roman writing and discourse during Caesar's time. Generally, Gaul included all of the regions primarily inhabited by Celts, aside from the province of Gallia Narbonensis (modern-day Provence and Languedoc-Roussillon), which had already been conquered in Caesar's time, therefore encompassing the rest of modern France, Belgium, Western Germany, and parts of Switzerland. As the Roman Republic made inroads deeper into Celtic territory and conquered more land, the definition of "Gaul" shifted. Concurrently, "Gaul" was also used in common parlance as a synonym for "uncouth" or "unsophisticated" as Romans saw Celtic peoples as uncivilized compared with themselves.

The victories in Gaul won by Caesar had increased the alarm and hostility of his enemies at Rome, and his aristocratic enemies, the boni, were spreading rumors about his intentions once he returned from Gaul. The boni intended to prosecute Caesar for abuse of his authority upon his return, when he would lay down his imperium. Such prosecution would not only see Caesar stripped of his wealth and citizenship, but also negate all of the laws he enacted during his term as Consul and his dispositions as pro-consul of Gaul. To defend himself against these threats, Caesar knew he needed the support of the plebeians, particularly the Tribunes of the Plebs, on whom he chiefly relied for help in carrying out his agenda. The Commentaries were an effort by Caesar to directly communicate with the plebeians – thereby circumventing the usual channels of communication that passed through the Senate – to propagandize his activities as efforts to increase the glory and influence of Rome. By winning the support of the people, Caesar sought to make himself unassailable from the boni. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Mar 7, 2021 |
Un libro escrito hace 2000+ años por un militar? (bueno, seguramente dictado y editador por sus secretarios) No parece que vaya a ser una maravilla.
Pero Julio Cesar mantiene moviendose en el libro como si fuera un campo de batalla. Variando entre el comentario politico, el movimiento de tropas, el desarrollo de batallas particulares y detalles culturales.

Por supuesto Cesar seguramente miente en todos los detalles, parece que siempre toma las decisiones tacticas y estrategicas ideales lo cual no pudo ser así siempre.

Pero ya se sabe que la historia la escriben los vencedores. ( )
  trusmis | Nov 28, 2020 |
Fascinating to be reading the words Julius Caser wrote over 2,000 years ago.
However, took a long time to get through this. Put the book down numerous times. ( )
  starkravingmad | Jul 4, 2020 |
Dividida en ocho libros.
  AlexiaValentina | Mar 23, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (111 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Caesar, Juliusprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Barabino, AndreaEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cunliffe, Barry W.Contributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dorminger, GeorgTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Edwards, H. J.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hammond, CarolynTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Handfors, S. A.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hirtius, Aulussecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Huibregtse, P.K.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hunink, VincentTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Katwijk-Knapp, F. H. vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lukstiņš, GustavsTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pearl, JosephTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rieu, E. V.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tadema, A.A.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wiseman, AnneTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wiseman, PeterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres, quarum unam incolunt Belgae, aliam Aquitani, tertiam qui ipsorum lingua Celtae, nostrae Galli appellantur.
Gaul is a whole divided into three parts, one of which is inhabited by the Belgae, another by the Aquitani, and a third by a people called in their own tongue Celtae, in the Latin Galli.
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This LibraryThing work is for translations of De bello Gallico into modern languages. Please do not combine it with the Latin text.
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Caesar portrayed his invasion of Gaul as being a defensive pre-emptive action, most historians agree that the wars were fought primarily to boost Caesar's political career and to pay off his massive debts. Even so, Gaul was extremely important to Rome, as they had been attacked many times by the Gauls. Conquering Gaul allowed Rome to secure the natural border of the river Rhine. Caesar painstakingly describes his military campaign, and this is it is still the most important historical source on the Gaul campaign. It is also a masterwork of political propaganda, as Caesar was keenly interested in manipulating his readers in Rome as he published this book just as the Roman Civil war began. W. A. Macdevitt's translations brings this land mark historic book alive.

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Best war memoir ever written by the greatest general who ever lived.
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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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