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Fall; or, Dodge in Hell

by Neal Stephenson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Dodge (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
1,0155015,889 (3.43)1 / 24
The #1 New York Times bestselling author of Seveneves, Anathem, Reamde, and Cryptonomicon returns with a wildly inventive and entertaining science fiction thriller--Paradise Lost by way of Philip K. Dick--that unfolds in the near future, in parallel worlds. In his youth, Richard "Dodge" Forthrast founded Corporation 9592, a gaming company that made him a multibillionaire. Now in his middle years, Dodge appreciates his comfortable, unencumbered life, managing his myriad business interests, and spending time with his beloved niece Zula and her young daughter, Sophia. One beautiful autumn day, while he undergoes a routine medical procedure, something goes irrevocably wrong. Dodge is pronounced brain dead and put on life support, leaving his stunned family and close friends with difficult decisions. Long ago, when a much younger Dodge drew up his will, he directed that his body be given to a cryonics company now owned by enigmatic tech entrepreneur Elmo Shepherd. Legally bound to follow the directive despite their misgivings, Dodge's family has his brain scanned and its data structures uploaded and stored in the cloud, until it can eventually be revived. In the coming years, technology allows Dodge's brain to be turned back on. It is an achievement that is nothing less than the disruption of death itself. An eternal afterlife--the Bitworld--is created, in which humans continue to exist as digital souls. But this brave new immortal world is not the Utopia it might first seem . . . Fall, or Dodge in Hell is pure, unadulterated fun: a grand drama of analog and digital, man and machine, angels and demons, gods and followers, the finite and the eternal. In this exhilarating epic, Neal Stephenson raises profound existential questions and touches on the revolutionary breakthroughs that are transforming our future. Combining the technological, philosophical, and spiritual in one grand myth, he delivers a mind-blowing speculative literary saga for the modern age.… (more)
  1. 10
    Reamde by Neal Stephenson (Mind_Booster_Noori)
  2. 10
    Surface Detail by Iain M. Banks (Mind_Booster_Noori)
  3. 00
    D'Aulaires' Book of Norse Myths by Ingri d'Aulaire (themulhern)
    themulhern: Remarkable coincidence: the day after I returned D'Aulaire's "Norse Gods and Giants" to the library, after having checked it out on a whim and found myself remembering how much I loved it as a child I started listening to the audio version of "Fall". And less than half an hour into the book there is an extraordinary discussion about the D'Aulaire's two books of myths, Greek and Norse, with a focus on the Norse, which I always thought was by far the better. How many literate people of my or Stephenson's age didn't fall in love with that extraordinary book?… (more)
  4. 00
    The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson (g33kgrrl)
    g33kgrrl: Normally I find it silly to recommend books by the same author, but The Diamond Age is a deep cut by now. While completely different stories, I find the parallel of the virtual quest/actual reality intriguing.
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» See also 24 mentions

English (48)  German (1)  All languages (49)
Showing 1-5 of 48 (next | show all)
Too long. Too much Imaginary Town ( )
  dualmon | Nov 17, 2021 |
Absolutely sucked me in, this one ... and then it seemed to devolve into nonsense and by the end I just wanted it to be over. I've said this before about Stephenson's works but I really wish that someone would be rather more ruthless with the editing pencil. ( )
  JBD1 | Oct 31, 2021 |
A pretty underwhelming third (4th?) act abandons nearly all the interesting characters and plot elements of the first two, devolving into paradise lost by way of the Lord of the rings as seen through a Scanner Darkly. Easily Stephenson's weakest. There were probably two related books about reality self selection, solipscism and simulation which could have been edited out of this and made excellent, connected by the timeless enoch root instead we get one rambling occasionally boring tome. ( )
  Adam_Gugliciello | Oct 26, 2021 |
I don't know. Ultimately I liked this book and I know Neal Stephenson writes really long books, but I feel like this book could have used some paring down. Plus I wasn't sure what the main thrust of the story was supposed to be? Was it an internet cautionary tale? Was it a story of have and have-nots? Was it a biblical retelling? Was it a technology cautionary tale? Was it a Quest story? It ended up being a little bit of all of these, but some of them I found more interesting than others. When I wasn't interested it was very easy to put the book down and not pick it up again for long periods of time. So the last 2/3rds of the book is fresher in my mind than the beginning. Still I'm glad I finished it. I have read Cryptonomicon and REAMDE, but not the Baroque Cycle, which may put my understanding of these stories a bit out of order. But I like hanging out with Neal Stephenson and his stories. It feels like being accepted into the smart kids clique.

I did receive an ARC of this book, but it was so long ago, I forgot from where. Thank you William Morrow, for sending me this ARC and the opportunity to read this book, even if I can't remember how I got the book!
  DrexEdit | Oct 3, 2021 |
Some elements of classic Stephenson in there, but I started to lose interest in it about 60% through and ended up flipping through most of the rest of the book just to see what happened at the end. Glad I checked this one out at the library rather than buying it, as I don't think I'll be re-reading it any time soon. ( )
  zakman14 | Aug 19, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 48 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Neal Stephensonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Corrigan, OwenCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Doré, GustaveIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hillgartner, MalcolmNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Metsch, FritzIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Springer, NickMapssecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Dodge (2)
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Dodge became conscious.
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The tragedy—and the entire point—of being a parent was the moment when the story stopped being about you.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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The #1 New York Times bestselling author of Seveneves, Anathem, Reamde, and Cryptonomicon returns with a wildly inventive and entertaining science fiction thriller--Paradise Lost by way of Philip K. Dick--that unfolds in the near future, in parallel worlds. In his youth, Richard "Dodge" Forthrast founded Corporation 9592, a gaming company that made him a multibillionaire. Now in his middle years, Dodge appreciates his comfortable, unencumbered life, managing his myriad business interests, and spending time with his beloved niece Zula and her young daughter, Sophia. One beautiful autumn day, while he undergoes a routine medical procedure, something goes irrevocably wrong. Dodge is pronounced brain dead and put on life support, leaving his stunned family and close friends with difficult decisions. Long ago, when a much younger Dodge drew up his will, he directed that his body be given to a cryonics company now owned by enigmatic tech entrepreneur Elmo Shepherd. Legally bound to follow the directive despite their misgivings, Dodge's family has his brain scanned and its data structures uploaded and stored in the cloud, until it can eventually be revived. In the coming years, technology allows Dodge's brain to be turned back on. It is an achievement that is nothing less than the disruption of death itself. An eternal afterlife--the Bitworld--is created, in which humans continue to exist as digital souls. But this brave new immortal world is not the Utopia it might first seem . . . Fall, or Dodge in Hell is pure, unadulterated fun: a grand drama of analog and digital, man and machine, angels and demons, gods and followers, the finite and the eternal. In this exhilarating epic, Neal Stephenson raises profound existential questions and touches on the revolutionary breakthroughs that are transforming our future. Combining the technological, philosophical, and spiritual in one grand myth, he delivers a mind-blowing speculative literary saga for the modern age.

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Average: (3.43)
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