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The Teahouse Fire (2006)

by Ellis Avery

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7381331,350 (3.46)17
Fiction. Historical Fiction. The fates of two women-one American, one Japanese-become entwined in this sweeping novel of nineteenth century Japan on the cusp of radical change and westernization. The Japanese tea ceremony, steeped in ritual, is at the heart of this story of an American girl, adopted by Kyoto's most important tea master and raised as attendant and surrogate younger sister to his privileged daughter Yukako. Pasts shrouded in secrets and mysterious traditions rocked by modernization make The Teahouse Fire a compelling and provocative story, lush in details and epic in scope.… (more)
  1. 20
    Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden (cransell)
    cransell: Another fictional look at a related aspect of Japanese society.
  2. 00
    Plum Wine by Angela Davis-Gardner (liao)
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» See also 17 mentions

English (12)  Spanish (1)  Dutch (1)  All languages (14)
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
Improbable but interesting - a 19th century Franco-American girl ends up in Japan with a missionary uncle and ends up running away and is taken in by a family whose fortune lies in the art of tea. Listening to the audiobook, I did have some trouble keeping track of the characters and the politics but I enjoyed it overall. ( )
  cindywho | May 27, 2019 |
I love books about 16th century Japan! This one was a great book, tells about the lives of 2 women, 1 american, and one Japanese. very moving! ( )
  kcoleman428 | Apr 3, 2013 |
A beautifully written and well paced book set in Japan during the transitional years of the Meiji Restoration (1865-1890). I read it before and during a trip to Japan, and it helped me place so much that I saw and experienced there- aesthetic sensibilities, gift giving and packaging, serious business sense, embracing and rejecting the latest technologies, unease about tradition vs. modernity, etc. Yes, it is somewhat long, and there isn't a lot of action outside the Shin family compound, but well crafted and highly recommended for those with an interest in Japanese culture and society. ( )
  belgrade18 | Jul 7, 2010 |
LIfe is too short to spend time reading a book you don't like! I gave up on this one ( )
  spotteddog | May 9, 2010 |
Try as i may, I simply could not make it through this book. It repeatedly described the details of the tea ceremony such that this description appeared to be the main character and Urako's story, thin as it was, filled in the gaps. As a result it was exceedingly boring and I was unable to continue.
Unless a reader is enchanted with the ancient Japanese tea ceremony, I suggest they skip this one. ( )
  AstridG | Jan 8, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ellis Averyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Caruso, BarbaraNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Fiction. Historical Fiction. The fates of two women-one American, one Japanese-become entwined in this sweeping novel of nineteenth century Japan on the cusp of radical change and westernization. The Japanese tea ceremony, steeped in ritual, is at the heart of this story of an American girl, adopted by Kyoto's most important tea master and raised as attendant and surrogate younger sister to his privileged daughter Yukako. Pasts shrouded in secrets and mysterious traditions rocked by modernization make The Teahouse Fire a compelling and provocative story, lush in details and epic in scope.

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