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The Temple of the Golden Pavilion

by Yukio Mishima

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
2,392486,363 (3.83)1 / 99
Because of the boyhood trauma of seeing his mother make love to another man in the presence of his dying father, Mizoguchi becomes a hopeless stutterer. Taunted by his schoolmates, he feels utterly alone until he becomes an acolyte at a famous temple in Kyoto. He quickly becomes obsessed with the beauty of the temple. Even when tempted by a friend into exploring the geisha district, he cannot escape its image. In the novel's soaring climax, he tries desperately to free himself from his fixation.… (more)
  1. 00
    In Cold Blood by Truman Capote (GYKM)
    GYKM: Like Truman Capote ten years later, Mishima not only conducted research into the crime that he would base his psychological novel on, but he also interviewed the arsonist.
  2. 00
    The Age of Blue by Yukio Mishima (GYKM)
    GYKM: Written in the same decade, but was based around a different real-life crime.
  3. 00
    Silk and Insight by Yukio Mishima (GYKM)
    GYKM: Another Mishima novel based on a real event.
  4. 00
    After the Banquet by Yukio Mishima (GYKM)
    GYKM: Another Mishima novel that he based on a real event.
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» See also 99 mentions

English (37)  Spanish (5)  Dutch (2)  Italian (1)  Catalan (1)  French (1)  Portuguese (1)  All languages (48)
Showing 1-5 of 37 (next | show all)
I can't tell where it's beautiful, but what was conceived in the dream, once corrected by reality, returns to stimulate the dream even more.

Therefore, all this is not so much the beauty of the Golden Temple itself, but the beauty of the Golden Temple that I have imagined with all my heart and soul.

The consistent "self-love" radiates to the external real objects to complete the endowment of beauty, the enhancement of beauty, and the in-depth cognition of self-transformation, thus gaining beauty. The Golden Pavilion, this idea almost makes me intoxicated", and he also hates the beauty of the Golden Pavilion, the beauty that hinders his life, the beauty that is the "golden rule of life", so he wants to destroy it. Beauty, just as Mishima wrote about Mizoguchi’s childhood—a teenager with two diametrically opposed wills to power. He had to destroy the beauty of the Golden Temple, destroy the old beauty he added to the Golden Temple, and fall in love with beauty again, the beauty of disillusionment that was violently destroyed, a beauty that destroyed beauty. Such as the following text:
"However, the forces of darkness woke up and pulled me back. I still want to burn the Golden Pavilion. At that time, a life that has been pre-planned, specially made by me, and never heard of before will begin."
  Maristot | Jun 5, 2023 |
Incredibly detailed description of what it is like to have a neurotic personality, and how it manifests in your social life. Also just a wonderful depiction of life in a Buddhist temple at the end of WW2 in Japan, something I knew absolutely nothing going into this. ( )
  AndrewFink | Jan 19, 2023 |
Incredibly detailed description of what it is like to have a neurotic personality, and how it manifests in your social life. Also just a wonderful depiction of life in a Buddhist temple at the end of WW2 in Japan, something I knew absolutely nothing going into this. ( )
  AndrewFink | Jan 19, 2023 |
Here's what I wrote in 2008 about this read: "Japanese monks and a big fire that destroyed their temple in Kyoto. Fictionalized account of actual historical events. Consider reading other books by author." At this point in time (Sept, 2022) I have zero memory of this book. ( )
  MGADMJK | Sep 16, 2022 |
Mishima inspires to describe his writing as something other than words. It's rich and clean and kind of uncomfortable, like freezing water that is deeper than it looks. There is relatively little plot to this book, with Mishima spending most of his time inside the mind of the main character, whose name is only mentioned twice. I enjoyed the expose of a troubled psyche, but it does make for a rather slow moving novel. The story was enhanced for me as I visited the Golden Pavilion the week I was reading this. I think if you're interested in Mishima, maybe start with the only other book of his I've read -- The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With The Sea. It has similar themes. ( )
  invisiblecityzen | Mar 13, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 37 (next | show all)
"An amazing literary feat in its minute delineation of a neurotic personality."
added by GYKM | editChicago Tribune
 
"Beautifully translated... Mishima re-erects Kyoto, plain and mountain, monastery, temple, town, as Victor Hugo made Paris out of Notre Dame."
added by GYKM | editThe Nation
 
"One of the few genuinely surprising, subtle, complex and profound novels of ideas to have appeared since Man’s Fate" […] "Mishima has fashioned a wildly original, paradoxical series of clashing meditations and actions"
added by GYKM | editHudson Review, Sidney Monas
 
In July, 1950, art lovers were shocked to hear that the Kinkakuji--the Temple of the Golden Pavilion--in Kyoto had been deliberately burned by a crazed young monk. At his trial, this ugly, stammering priest said that his hatred of all beauty had driven him to destroy the six-century-old building. He expressed no regrets.

From this incident and other details of his life an engrossing novel has been written by Yukio Mishima.
 

» Add other authors (10 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Mishima, Yukioprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Morris, IvanTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Keene, DonaldIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Komatsu, FumiIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ouwehand, C.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ouwehand, C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ross, Nancy WilsonIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Ever since my childhood, Father had often spoken to me about the Golden Temple.
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When you meet the Buddha, kill the Buddha.
What transforms this world is—knowledge.
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Because of the boyhood trauma of seeing his mother make love to another man in the presence of his dying father, Mizoguchi becomes a hopeless stutterer. Taunted by his schoolmates, he feels utterly alone until he becomes an acolyte at a famous temple in Kyoto. He quickly becomes obsessed with the beauty of the temple. Even when tempted by a friend into exploring the geisha district, he cannot escape its image. In the novel's soaring climax, he tries desperately to free himself from his fixation.

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