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No Time to Spare: Thinking About What Matters (2017)

by Ursula K. Le Guin

Other authors: Karen Joy Fowler (Introduction)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9545321,690 (4.06)62
"From acclaimed author Ursula K. Le Guin, and with an introduction by Karen Joy Fowler, a collection of thoughts--always adroit, often acerbic--on aging, belief, the state of literature, and the state of the nation. Ursula K. Le Guin has taken readers to imaginary worlds for decades. Now she's in the last great frontier of life, old age, and exploring new literary territory: the blog, a forum where her voice -- sharp, witty, as compassionate as it is critical -- shines. No Time to Spare collects the best of Ursula's blog, presenting perfectly crystallized dispatches on what matters to her now, her concerns with this world, and her wonder at it. On the absurdity of denying your age, she says, "If I'm ninety and believe I'm forty-five, I'm headed for a very bad time trying to get out of the bathtub." On cultural perceptions of fantasy: "The direction of escape is toward freedom. So what is 'escapism' an accusation of? " On her new cat: "He still won't sit on a lap" -- "From acclaimed author Ursula K. Le Guin, a collection of thoughts--always adroit, often acerbic--on aging, belief, the state of literature, and the state of the nation"--… (more)
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» See also 62 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 52 (next | show all)
No surprise at all that it would be Ursula K. Le Guin that would pull me out of a crappy headspace. I am grateful for this little collection that charmed me during the ongoing hours of isolation. ( )
  Andy5185 | Jul 9, 2023 |
In her essays in this book, LeGuin shows herself to be a nice cat-loving old lady, a cranky octogenarian, a really sharp observer and thinker, and a beautiful writer, by turns.

This is one of those rare books that should be judged not based on how much you get out of the book, but how much the book gets out of you. I didn't relate to everything in this book of short blog posts. For example, I have no knowledge of or interest in opera or classical music, so those posts didn't work for me. But the ones that did interest me kept me thinking for days afterward. They are all very, very short. ( )
  vwinsloe | Jul 2, 2023 |
This is one I read some time ago and cannot recall enough about to review. It's hard to fault Le Guin, though. ( )
  mykl-s | May 23, 2023 |
short pieces, several interesting. Quick read. ( )
  JudyGibson | Jan 26, 2023 |
In turns poetic, cantankerous, thoughtful, funny, Le Guin tears through what she wishes to discuss with short bursts of energy. Often it feels for the reader like the staccato drumming of rain on a tin roof. Unrelenting, until the storm itself passes. Her essays can be critical and uncompromising, but under all of that is thoughtfulness, and knowledge harvested from a long life well lived. ( )
  TomMcGreevy | Jan 19, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 52 (next | show all)
Prompted by an alumni survey from her alma mater, Radcliffe, that asks how she occupies her spare time, she takes issue with the idea that any time occupied by living—whether that means reading, writing, cooking, eating, cleaning, etc.—can be considered spare. Moreover, with her 81st birthday fast approaching, Le Guin declares, ”I have no time to spare.”
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ursula K. Le Guinprimary authorall editionscalculated
Fowler, Karen JoyIntroductionsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wachs , Anne-MarieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To Vonda N. McIntyre, with love
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I've been inspired by Jose Saramago's extraordinary blogs, which he posted when he was eighty-five and eighty-six years old.
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Old age is for anybody who gets there.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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"From acclaimed author Ursula K. Le Guin, and with an introduction by Karen Joy Fowler, a collection of thoughts--always adroit, often acerbic--on aging, belief, the state of literature, and the state of the nation. Ursula K. Le Guin has taken readers to imaginary worlds for decades. Now she's in the last great frontier of life, old age, and exploring new literary territory: the blog, a forum where her voice -- sharp, witty, as compassionate as it is critical -- shines. No Time to Spare collects the best of Ursula's blog, presenting perfectly crystallized dispatches on what matters to her now, her concerns with this world, and her wonder at it. On the absurdity of denying your age, she says, "If I'm ninety and believe I'm forty-five, I'm headed for a very bad time trying to get out of the bathtub." On cultural perceptions of fantasy: "The direction of escape is toward freedom. So what is 'escapism' an accusation of? " On her new cat: "He still won't sit on a lap" -- "From acclaimed author Ursula K. Le Guin, a collection of thoughts--always adroit, often acerbic--on aging, belief, the state of literature, and the state of the nation"--

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