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Cathedral (1983)

by Raymond Carver

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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2,782914,184 (4.17)53
Raymond Carver's third collection of stories, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, including the canonical titular story about blindness and learning to enter the very different world of another.  These twelve stories mark a turning point in Carver's work and "overflow with the danger, excitement, mystery and possibility of life. . . . Carver is a writer of astonishing compassion and honesty. . . . his eye set only on describing and revealing the world as he sees it. His eye is so clear, it almost breaks your heart" (Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post Book World).… (more)
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» See also 53 mentions

English (82)  Spanish (5)  French (2)  Italian (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (91)
Showing 1-5 of 82 (next | show all)
No carece de mérito provocar cierta tensión en el lector mientras se narran sucesos triviales o que el lector sospeche que una sombra de amenaza se cierne sobre los personajes en situaciones anodinas, comunes. Nada más, cuando la fractura de la vida cotidiana se abate sobre un personaje el relato continúa impertérrito. Nada provoca la reflexión o la pasión trágica. La realidad se impone como una fría losa y la exposición que Carver hace de ella con su estilo contenido nos aleja de cualquier empatía para con los personajes. Relatos que se contemplan desde la lejanía, desde el otro lado del muro, y seguramente se olviden pronto. Efímeros no por extensión sino por la escasa huella que dejan. ( )
  GilgameshUruk | Jul 17, 2022 |
Puoi trovare questa recensione anche sul mio blog, La siepe di more

Raymond Carver è uno di quegli autori che è facile incrociare quando si cerca ispirazione per qualcosa da leggere: è uno dei grandi della letteratura statunitense del Novecento e scriveva storie brevi, due ottimi requisiti per essere consigliati a unǝ lettorǝ in cerca del prossimo amore letterario. Eppure non aveva attirato abbastanza la mia attenzione: meno male è stato scelto come libro del mese per LiberTiAmo. È stato amore a prima lettura.

Me lo sono divorato questo fine settimana e sento ancora l’intenso sapore di vita sulla lingua. È difficile descrivere cosa si prova nel leggere questi racconti perché è come mettere nero su bianco cosa si prova a essere vivз e a fare delle esperienze in quanto essere umano vivo: sai com’è a un livello istintivo perché sei vivǝ, ma spiegarlo?

È qui che entra in gioco la letteratura – e le arti, in generale: la bellezza di Cattedrale è tutta qui. Riesce a descrivere quello che normalmente non siamo in grado di esprimere a parole e lo fa con quella semplicità che sembra alla portata di chiunque, ma che in realtà è uno dei risultati più difficili da raggiungere per unǝ scrittorǝ.

Non ho altro da aggiungere: è uno di quei libri da leggere e non da raccontare, tanto più che è una lettura relativamente veloce. Buttatevi, che è bello! ( )
  Baylee_Lasiepedimore | May 13, 2022 |
In Cathedral, Raymond Carver offers the reader a powerful set of stories about people who are experiencing the worst things in their lives: divorce or abandonment, alcoholism, the death of a loved one, the loss of a job, feeling isolated and trapped in a relationship, and so on. In each of the dozen tales comprising the volume, we are dropped into the middle of a situation in which an otherwise unexceptional person faces some sort of crisis or cathartic event and struggles to deal with the situation. Whether these characters ever find their way out of their respective messes is something we never really learn, as the stories are left largely unresolved in the end. In fact, the real genius that the author brings to bear in this compelling collection is that he takes his protagonists as he finds them and is content to just tell a piece of their stories in a tender, if unflinching, manner. If there is a recurring theme connecting this fiction it is the slow and heartbreaking destruction that alcoholism can have on everyone connected to the one doing the drinking.

While there is not a weak story in the entire book, there were some that stood out well above the others. The title tale ‘Cathedral’ is a masterful look at both the regret that can sometimes overwhelm a marriage as well as having to confront long-held prejudices in surprising ways. ‘A Small, Good Thing’ is an ironic look at how a simple miscommunication can spiral out of control when conflated with a truly harrowing personal tragedy. ‘Where I’m Calling From’ probably comes the closest to being optimistic storytelling, despite its setting in a rehabilitation facility populated by people who have been there on multiple occasions. ‘Chef’s House’ is a very intimate portrait of the fragility involved in trying to confront one’s demons and get sober. To be sure, these are not happy stories or stories in which the characters are redeemed at the end of a long, fraught struggle. Apparently, the author himself suffered as a recovering alcoholic and, if that is true, he definitely wrote the life that he knew. That he was able to write it so very well was his lasting gift to all of us. ( )
  browner56 | Apr 4, 2022 |
Increíble prosa pero cómo me cuesta el mundo gris y triste de Carver. ( )
  eduardochang | Feb 3, 2022 |
Wow, how did I ever miss this? I loved these stories and his style. Arresting. Crisp. I know I’ll carry a few of these with me - particularly, "A Small Good Thing." ( )
  shaundeane | Sep 13, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 82 (next | show all)
The Cathedral is a story of how a man, known as the narrator, overcomes his predisposition towards a culture that is unknown to him. From the beginning, the narrator does not like Robert, and he really has no reason for it. He has his stereotypes that he sticks to in the beginning, until Robert starts to prove many of them false. It is apparent that the narrator is very big on appearance, and this is shown through his fascination that a blind man had a beard. Later in the story, the narrator also points out that Robert did not wear sunglasses or use a cane. The narrator thought about how pitiful Roberts wife was, and how awful their relationship must have been because she would never receive a compliment based on her looks by her loved one. This shows what type of a husband he is, and what he values in his marriage. The narrator doesn't seem to have many friends, and his wife even points this out, and he seems to drink and smoke a lot. Although he can see, in comparison, he seems like the blind one. Although Robert is physically blind, he is a real jack of trades. He hasn't let his blindness get in the way of his happiness and it just goes to show that you can be blind, and still truly see. The narrator begins to understand this at the end of the story when he draws the cathedral with Robert and begins to bridge the gap between himself and true understanding.
added by smyth104 | editSchool
 

» Add other authors (7 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Raymond Carverprimary authorall editionscalculated
Duranti, RiccardoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Harvill (246)
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For Tess Gallagher
For Tess Gallagher and in memory of John Gardner
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This friend of mine from work, Bud, he asked Fran and me to supper.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Raymond Carver's third collection of stories, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, including the canonical titular story about blindness and learning to enter the very different world of another.  These twelve stories mark a turning point in Carver's work and "overflow with the danger, excitement, mystery and possibility of life. . . . Carver is a writer of astonishing compassion and honesty. . . . his eye set only on describing and revealing the world as he sees it. His eye is so clear, it almost breaks your heart" (Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post Book World).

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Contains: Feathers -- Chef's house -- Preservation -- The compartment -- A small, good thing -- Vitamins -- Careful -- Where I'm calling from -- The train -- Fever -- The bridle -- Cathedral.
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