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Vox by Christina Dalcher
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5496128,181 (3.61)29
On the day the government decrees that women are no longer allowed more than one hundred words per day, Dr. Jean McClellan is in denial. This can't happen here. Not in America. Not to her. This is just the beginning. Soon women are not permitted to hold jobs. Girls are not taught to read or write. Females no longer have a voice. Before, the average person spoke sixteen thousand words each day, but now women have only one hundred to make themselves heard. For herself, her daughter, and every woman silenced, Jean will reclaim her voice.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 58 (next | show all)
Interesting premise- religious extremists want a world where men are in power and women are submissive, silent homemakers. Women are only allowed 100 words per day. The political climate is such that people are trying to flee before walls are put up. I'm okay with unlikeable characters but everyone in this book was annoying. The dialogue was cringy and the characters were cliches. I had to skim the end because I wasn't engaged enough. ( )
  preetibee | Aug 31, 2019 |
Narrated by Julia Whelan.
  Salsabrarian | Aug 21, 2019 |
In the not too distant future, fundamentalists have control of the government and women have been silenced. Not allowed to work, read, have an opinion independent of doctrine, or an equal education, women and girls in the United States are also required to wear a bracelet that counts how many words they have spoken in a day. With a limit of 100 words, women are unable to be heard in all spheres; home, social, policitial, economical. Jean, a former linguist at the top of her field, has been forced to comply with the new laws through threat of pain, torture, and enslavement. Suddenly, Jean is given the opportunity of escape her enforced domestication, but at the cost of helping the very government she abhors. Will she do it?
Christina Dalcher has created a realistic dystopia using all too familiar themes that can now be seen in the world as it exists now. The story is intriguing, but more importantly, it shows the reader what can happen by staying silent and complicit up until it is too late. This is a great book for individuals and bookclubs alike. ( )
  Bibliophilly | Aug 12, 2019 |
"Everything lately seems to be a choice between degrees of hate."

( )
  untitled841 | Jul 24, 2019 |
Christina Dalcher’s Vox has an intriguing, and some would say prophetic, premise. The main character and first-person narrator, Dr. Jean McClellan, lives in a society where women were silenced virtually overnight. Like all women in the US, she is now mandated to wear a bracelet, or counter, which delivers a series of electric shocks if she speaks over 100 words a day. Once a prominent scientist in her field, Jean now spends her days at home, catering to her family’s every need, and quietly seething as she reflects on how so many people, herself included, didn’t see this coming.

Dystopian novels like George Orwell’s 1984 and Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale became classics because they are nuanced. Everything from the characters to the propaganda is subtle enough to be believable. In Vox, the antagonists and their message are exaggerated to the extreme. All men are portrayed as either evil or passive. Most women are so defeated that they don’t fight back and many fully embrace the new roles that have been thrust upon them. Children parrot their new “traditional” schooling and report their own parents and fellow students if they don’t fall in line. Dalcher’s message is so heavy-handed that it becomes exhausting.

The main plot of the novel is straightforward, if somewhat overly reliant on technical jargon. Unfortunately, the addition of numerous subplots, most of them ridiculous, detracts significantly from the story. Toss in a few predictable and thematically inappropriate twists, and you get a confusing hodgepodge of genres that don’t mesh well. Jean’s personality, which is shallow to begin with, contradicts itself in many of the new situations that arise. In the first few chapters, Dalcher highlights Jean’s intelligence and loyalty to her family, but as the story continues, Jean morphs into a completely different person. At the drop of a hat, she makes rash decisions that could put her entire family in danger, and her reasoning is explained poorly, if at all.

Vox could have been a fascinating novel. It could have provided compelling reasons for the swift rise of the new patriarchy. Instead, it turns men and conservatives into villains, portraying them as inhuman monsters. While Dalcher never goes so far as to depict Jean and her fellow activists as perfect, their actions and principles are glorified. I write the following as a self-proclaimed feminist and liberal: the extreme thinking presented in this novel is what has caused such a huge rift in the United States. If more people would listen to other points of view without resorting to name-calling and bitter rhetoric, we would be a much healthier society. This may be too much to ask. At the very least, avoid books that encourage hate and division. Unfortunately, Vox is one of the worst offenders.

Vox by Christina Dalcher will be released by Berkley Publishing on August 21st, 2018.

Disclaimer: I received an Advanced Reader Copy of this novel from Goodreads Giveaways in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  Codonnelly | Jun 24, 2019 |
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In memory of Charlie Jones linguist, professor, friend.
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If anyone told me I could bring down the president, and the Pure Movement, and that incompetent little shit Morgan LeBron in a week’s time, I wouldn’t believe them.
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On the day the government decrees that women are no longer allowed more than one hundred words per day, Dr. Jean McClellan is in denial. This can't happen here. Not in America. Not to her. This is just the beginning. Soon women are not permitted to hold jobs. Girls are not taught to read or write. Females no longer have a voice. Before, the average person spoke sixteen thousand words each day, but now women have only one hundred to make themselves heard. For herself, her daughter, and every woman silenced, Jean will reclaim her voice.

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