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There's No Toilet Paper on the Road Less Traveled: The Best of Travel Humor and Misadventure (1998)

by Doug Lansky (Editor)

Other authors: David Arizmendi (Contributor), Nigel Barley (Contributor), Dave Barry (Contributor), O.M. Bodè (Contributor), Bill Bryson (Contributor)21 more, Jon Carroll (Contributor), Sophia Dembling (Contributor), Carl Franz (Contributor), John Krich (Contributor), Doug Lanksy (Contributor), David Leavitt (Contributor), Donna Marazzo (Contributor), Peter Mayle (Contributor), Lara Naaman (Contributor), Rory Nugent (Contributor), Joseph O'Connor (Contributor), P.J. O'Rourke (Contributor), Caryl Rivers (Contributor), Mary Roach (Contributor), Paul William Roberts (Contributor), Ralph Schoenstein (Contributor), Richard Sterling (Contributor), Susan Storm (Contributor), Calvin Trillin (Contributor), David Foster Wallace (Contributor), Alan Zweibel (Contributor)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2105128,583 (3.22)2
The perfect trip, where nothing goes wrong, is surely not the memorable trip, which is whereeverything goes wrong and one lives to tell the tale -- and laugh about it. This collection captures the wackiest and most bizarre experiences of well-known writers whose travels have taken a detour. Stories include Nigel Barley escorting a monkey to the movies in Cameroon, Dave Barry vainly trying to learn more Japanese than how to order a beer, Alan Zweible high-tailing it to a nudist camp, Donna Marazzo bravely attempting to use a high-tech Italian toilet, and Richard Sterling feasting on deep-fried potato bugs in Burma. There are even practical tips here too; readers can surely learn from Mary Roach, who discovers that utilizing an Antarctic ice-sheet outhouse at the very moment a seal chooses to use its opening as a blowhole may not be the best way to start the day.… (more)
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» See also 2 mentions

Showing 5 of 5
Half of this collection of short stories are great. The others not so much. ( )
  Harrod | Oct 30, 2013 |
I just didn't find most of this very funny. It's hard to say why, but most of the anecdotes seemed dull. ( )
  OshoOsho | Mar 30, 2013 |
Some stories are funnier than others but overall it makes a good travel read ( )
  nachov | Aug 9, 2011 |
I have read this one before, but it was a great re-read. My favourite pieces are Dave Barry's on Japan, because sometimes learning Japan does feel like that--actually most of the Barry's and the Bryson. A great laugh. ( )
  skinglist | Jan 8, 2009 |
Some pretty decent stories in here, and some that I thought fell pretty flat. But it certainly reinforced my desire to not travel to third world countries... ( )
  sapsygo | Jan 27, 2006 |
Showing 5 of 5
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lansky, DougEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Arizmendi, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Barley, NigelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Barry, DaveContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bodè, O.M.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bryson, BillContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Carroll, JonContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dembling, SophiaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Franz, CarlContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Krich, JohnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lanksy, DougContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Leavitt, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Marazzo, DonnaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mayle, PeterContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Naaman, LaraContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Nugent, RoryContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
O'Connor, JosephContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
O'Rourke, P.J.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rivers, CarylContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Roach, MaryContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Roberts, Paul WilliamContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Schoenstein, RalphContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sterling, RichardContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Storm, SusanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Trillin, CalvinContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wallace, David FosterContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Zweibel, AlanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

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Humor is not a trick.
Humor is a presence in the world—
like grace—
and shines son everybody.

Garrison Keillor
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The perfect trip, where nothing goes wrong, is surely not the memorable trip, which is whereeverything goes wrong and one lives to tell the tale -- and laugh about it. This collection captures the wackiest and most bizarre experiences of well-known writers whose travels have taken a detour. Stories include Nigel Barley escorting a monkey to the movies in Cameroon, Dave Barry vainly trying to learn more Japanese than how to order a beer, Alan Zweible high-tailing it to a nudist camp, Donna Marazzo bravely attempting to use a high-tech Italian toilet, and Richard Sterling feasting on deep-fried potato bugs in Burma. There are even practical tips here too; readers can surely learn from Mary Roach, who discovers that utilizing an Antarctic ice-sheet outhouse at the very moment a seal chooses to use its opening as a blowhole may not be the best way to start the day.

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