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Remote Control

by Nnedi Okorafor

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6785234,797 (3.97)42
"The day Fatima forgot her name, Death paid a visit. From here on in she would be known as Sankofa--a name that meant nothing to anyone but her, the only tie to her family and her past. Her touch is death, and with a glance a town can fall. And she walks-alone, except for her fox companion-searching for the object that came from the sky and gave itself to her when the meteors fell and when she was yet unchanged; searching for answers. But is there a greater purpose for Sankofa, now that Death is her constant companion?"--… (more)
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» See also 42 mentions

English (51)  Dutch (1)  All languages (52)
Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
Thoroughly fantastic piece of Africanfuturism with an immersive story and a main character who you can’t help but root for. I forgot how much I enjoy Okorafor’s writing style; it’s crisp and paints a really clear, detailed picture but it also very concise and never drags. The way Ghanaian culture, advanced technology, and alien elements are woven together in “Remote Control” makes for a unique work that feels grounded in reality yet so futuristic all at once.
Finally, the audiobook narrator, Adjoa Andoh, does an amazing job at narrating this story! I would absolutely recommend listening to her if you are able. ( )
  deborahee | Feb 23, 2024 |
In this novella, an adolescent Ghanian girl, Sankofa, finds an artifact in her family’s shea tree farm that changes her forever. The story reads like handed-down folklore but is actually set in the near future. After the artifact is lost, Sankofa wanders from town to town searching for it with a fox and a cat. She is known to the people she encounters as the Adopted Daughter of Death, and they treat her well so that she does not bring death to them. She lives up to her name in dealing with those who do not treat her well. Beyond that, discussing the story would be a spoiler, other than to say that it reads like an ancient mythological quest set in Africa in a future world with robots. Although I do not generally read science fiction/fantasy, this story is much more as it explores familiar themes of loss, redemption, and female empowerment in a fresh way that drew me in. I enjoyed it even more than I did Ms. Okorafor’s Binti, which I read last year. I read along with the audio version narrated by Adjoa Andoh. Science Fiction/Fantasy, Afrofuturist fiction. ( )
  bschweiger | Feb 4, 2024 |
Death's daughter is wandering the byways of Ghana. People are so anxious to avoid offending her that they readily invite her into their homes, have custom clothing made for her, feed her the best from their pantry and follow her every whim.

But who is this child? That is the fascinating question at the centre of this beautifully written work and getting to know, not only who she is and what she's seeking, but who she was before her powers possessed her, is a wonderful, if slightly short, journey. I just wish there was more. This book suffers a little from a lack of striking or compelling plot, but the heroine is so likeable and the story so evocative that it's easy to forgive this. The complex structures of modern, Ghanaian society are explored without flinching. The loneliness of a child who cannot ever have friends haunts the narrative. ( )
  D.Harrigon | Jan 27, 2024 |
Loved it. It's effortless to read, it's never highly exciting, but it just holds your attention. I could have wanted a bit more explanation, but I was still very happy with it. ( )
  zjakkelien | Jan 2, 2024 |
Sankofa is recognized and offered gifts wherever she roams in Ghana of the near future. The gifts are to appease her because the villagers believe her to be Death. They call her "Remote control" because of her ability to kill without touching anyone. Twelve year old Sankofa used to be six year old Fatima whose favorite activity was sitting in the branches of the family shea tree and drawing her sky words. One night, a mysterious box with a mysterious seed appears and Sankofa begins her journey along with her faithful fox companion, Movenpick. Mostly folk tale with some science fiction, this an ethereally written book about outsiders, community, the way you are seen by others and whether or not you should care. ( )
  jennifergeran | Dec 23, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Nnedi Okoraforprimary authorall editionscalculated
Ruth, GregCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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"You come at the king, you best not miss." -- Omar Little, The Wire
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The moon was just rising when Sankofa came up the dirt road.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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"The day Fatima forgot her name, Death paid a visit. From here on in she would be known as Sankofa--a name that meant nothing to anyone but her, the only tie to her family and her past. Her touch is death, and with a glance a town can fall. And she walks-alone, except for her fox companion-searching for the object that came from the sky and gave itself to her when the meteors fell and when she was yet unchanged; searching for answers. But is there a greater purpose for Sankofa, now that Death is her constant companion?"--

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Average: (3.97)
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3 26
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