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Dragon Bones by Patricia Briggs
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Dragon Bones

by Patricia Briggs

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Hurog Duology (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,207359,638 (4)41
  1. 00
    Black Unicorn by Tanith Lee (sandstone78)
    sandstone78: For the bones of mystical creatures.
  2. 00
    Arrows of the Queen by Mercedes Lackey (SunnySD)
  3. 00
    Blood of the Dragon [novella] by George R. R. Martin (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For the descendants of dragons.
  4. 00
    Dragon Prince by Melanie Rawn (MyriadBooks)
    MyriadBooks: For barbarian, Machiavellian princes (and their dragons).
  5. 15
    A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin (quenstalof)
    quenstalof: Both are high fantasy epics with dragons :-)
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» See also 41 mentions

English (34)  German (1)  All languages (35)
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
I love this series :-) ( )
  ClareRhoden | May 1, 2018 |
2017, paperback ( )
  Loves22Read | Jan 22, 2017 |
Patricia Briggs is an old favorite of mine – I've loved her from page one of the first book I ever read by her. Which might well have been this one – not my favorites among her work, the Hurog Duology, but (as I always say) that's like saying "not my favorite chocolate". In hunting out books on CD to listen to in the car, I came across Dragon Bones on MP3 CD for a surprisingly low price ($5! I think it was on sale), and while I didn't love the sample I went with it.

Note to self: don't do that. It's not worth it. It doesn't really matter how cheap something is if you're going to spend several commutes sighing over it (in a not-good way) – or yelling at it.

The book is excellent. I remember the last time I re-read it, a couple or three years ago, and I remember finishing it with happy sighs. I love the characters, and I love the setting and worldbuilding, I love Patricia Briggs's style, I love this book.

The narrator …

The narrator is an actor. His voice wasn't too familiar, so I did the Google Image thing, and went "oh, right", and then shuddered over that picture of him with the cornrows. (Damn, I used up my brain bleach after my coworker got back from a weekend with her ex.) And for parts of the book he's just fine. He is not, in the main, unpleasant to listen to. I found it a little annoying that the voice of the main character, Wardwick, is deeper than the first person narration, but Ward spends most of his time trying to sound dumb, so it's kind of an assumed voice. Fortunately for the sake of the audiobook Ward's sister is mute, so I didn't have to worry about how that characterization would come out.

One problem is that Mr. Manganiello has a bad case of Misplaced Emphasis Disorder. Stressing one word over another, obviously, indicates how the sentence should be interpreted by the listener. When the stress is on the obviously wrong word, it changes the meaning of the sentence and acts as a huge distraction from the story. "So he thought" is completely different from "'So,' he thought", and they're both completely different from "so he thought". I would expect an experienced actor to have a better sense for that – or for there to be a director on hand somewhere saying "hold on, try that again". And then there's an irritating sharp "S" now and then. I'm just grateful I wasn't listening to it with earphones.

I would also expect a sentence like "they'd improved a bed before the fireplace" to be fixed. How did no one catch that and get it fixed to "improvised"?

But in the end the book prevails over the reader. Ward is a wonderful, wonderful character, surrounded by wonderful characters. I always say about Barbara Hambly that you could take any secondary character, or even any background character, and there is enough to them that you (she) could turn around and write a book centered on that character. Patricia Briggs comes very close to that as well. Ward's sister is terrific. His allies in the household are well-rounded – and are presented believably as people who have learned not to provoke their ruler, who have known Ward as damaged and slow for years and have to adjust to his real self. The evil – Ward's father, the king, the one that betrays Ward – is a bit "evil-for-evil's-sake", but they're frightening and effective. But Oreg is a rich character who could support any number of books on his own.

The setting is wonderfully realized, as well. And I enjoy the fact that Ward and his folk are the barbarians of their world; they aren't necessarily expected to eat with utensils and speak in complete sentences. And I think it's pretty marvelous that Ward takes advantage of that, and of his own appearance, to make his way in the world as needed. He's … just a great character.

So, no, while this and its sequel aren't my favorite books by Patricia Briggs, I love them.

The audiobooks? Not so much. ( )
  Stewartry | Dec 29, 2016 |
Hard to get into. ( )
  LaPhenix | Mar 8, 2016 |
A really well-done, entertaining fantasy. I had heard that Briggs' was known for "romantic" fantasy, which made me a bit apprehensive, but there was really no relationship-type romance in this story at all.
However, it was definitely a 'romance' is the old sense of the term!
Ward, a young heir to a remote fiefdom, had pretended to be brain-damaged in order to avoid his vicious father's jealous beatings. But when the old man passes away, he discovers his ruse, although it may have saved his life, has now gotten him in further trouble. Emissaries from the king arrive, searching out a runaway slave, and when Ward sticks his neck out to protect her, that's simply more of an excuse to enforce an
order from the king that Ward should be institutionalized and the property left to the care of his uncle.
Not caring for the idea of the institution, Ward, with the helf of the 'family ghost' runs away with some loyal friends and followers, hoping to become a mercenary and rescue his reputation by gaining reknown as a warrior.
His true desire, however, is still to gain title to his hereditary lands - with which he feels a magical bond... which could have something to do with the mysterious dragon bones hidden in the basement of the castle.
A good mix of traditional elements and unexpected twists puts this story a good cut above the average fantasy.
( )
  AltheaAnn | Feb 9, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Patricia Briggsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Enzweiler, MichaelMapssecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Manganiello, JoeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Targete, Jean PierreCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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To Collin, Amanda, and Jordan. May you always dream of dragons.
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Breathing heavily from the climb, I sat upon the ancient bronze doors some long-distant ancestor had placed flat into the highest face of the mountain.
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Book description
Playing the fool

Most everyone thinks Ward of Hurog is a simple-minded fool - and that's just fine by him. But few people know that his foolishness is (very convincingly) feigned. And it's all that's saved him from death at the hands of his abusive father, who's always seen Ward as a bitter rival for power.

When his father dies, Ward becomes the new lord of Hurog ... until a nobleman declares that he is too dim-witted to rule. Ward knows he cannot play the fool any longer. To regain his kingdom, he must prove himself worth - and quickly.

Riding into a war that's heating up on the border, Ward is sure he's on the fast track to glory. But soon his mission takes a deadly serious turn, for he has seen a pile of magical dragon bones hidden deep beneath Hurog Keep. the bones can be dangerous in the wrong hands, and Ward is certain his enemies will stop at nothing to possess them. ...
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0441009166, Mass Market Paperback)

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Iron Kissed?a magical tale.

Riding into a war that?s heating up on the border, Ward, the new lord of Herzog, is sure he?s on the fast track to glory. But soon his mission takes a deadly turn. For he has seen a pile of magical dragon bones hidden deep beneath Hurog Keep. The bones could prove to be dangerous in the wrong hands, and Ward is certain his enemies will stop at nothing to possess them.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:04 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Ward of Hurog has tried all his life to convince people he is just a simple, harmless fool...And it's worked. But now, to regain his kingdom, he must ride into war-and convince them otherwise.

» see all 2 descriptions

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