HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Consider the Lobster and Other Essays (2005)

by David Foster Wallace

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,334772,692 (4.13)178
For this collection, Wallace immerses himself in the three-ring circus that is the presidential race in order to document one of the most vicious campaigns in recent history. Later he strolls from booth to booth at a lobster festival in Maine and risks life and limb to get to the bottom of the lobster question. Then he wheedles his way into an L.A. radio studio, armed with tubs of chicken, to get the behind-the-scenes view of a conservative talk show featuring a host with an unnatural penchant for clothing that looks good only on the radio. Do lobsters feel pain? Did Franz Kafka have a sick sense of humor? What is John Updike's deal anyway? And who won the Adult Video News' Female Performer of the Year Award the same year Gwyneth Paltrow won her Oscar? Wallace answers these questions and more.--From publisher description.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 178 mentions

English (74)  Spanish (1)  Japanese (1)  German (1)  All languages (77)
Showing 1-5 of 74 (next | show all)
It's not often that I read a collection of essays. But I must say, I was immersed in this collection almost immediately. What caused this, was rather than preaching to me, piling on facts, trying to convince me his thoughts were correct, Wallace engaged me in a dialogue. There's no questioning his intelligence, and no doubt that Wallace sees things from a very different perspective. But time after time after making what seemed a valid point. He would ask a question. What about this ? How about that ? Could this be the case? Hours after I'd put this book down I'd find myself not just reflecting on the points Wallace made, but pondering upon the questions he asked. The more you think about a book the more it stays with you. This one will stay with me for a long time. ( )
  kevinkevbo | Jul 14, 2023 |
There are ways in which footnotes can be made works of art, and ways in which subjects of review become implements to explore the human condition. ( )
  gideonslife | Jan 5, 2023 |
This is the second David Foster Wallace essay collection I've read. Man, I love this guy. What a mind. When I read him, I feel like I'm being invited into his thought process (Consider the Lobster is as much an argument with himself as it is persuasive to the reader), and the experience is both challenging and entertaining. And the subject doesn't really matter-after reading two collections of his essays, I really believe he could write about anything and it would be original, thought-provoking and good.

It's a weird combo of essays. Maybe that's just how these collections turn out, since the other collection I read was like that too. Here in one book, we have essays about the 2000 presidential election (he wrote an article for Rolling Stone about the McCain campaign), the porn industry (more than I ever wanted or needed to know), book reviews and reflections on authors past and present, American language usage, September 11, and the ethics of cooking lobster. It's hard to pick favorites, because they're all so good, but I liked the American usage one a lot, as well as the one on the election (weird, because I hate politics) and the title essay.

When I read [b:A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again|6748|A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again|David Foster Wallace|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1344270821s/6748.jpg|574], I had to use the dictionary a lot. This time, I put the book on my kindle. Built-in dictionary. I do believe that is my favorite feature. The funny thing is, there were still words my dictionary didn't know. But it never comes across like he's just throwing around fancy words to show off. I think he had a very large vocabulary, and he chose his words carefully. That's the picture I get of him when I'm reading his essays, anyway.

In short (cough cough), I think the world of this writer. I wish he were still around, thinking deep thoughts and writing about anything and everything. ( )
  Harks | Dec 17, 2022 |
Wow.. I've never read DFW and just don't have the nerve to tackle Infinite Jest, so thought I'd start with this collection.

Really enjoyed most of the stories. Though interesting, I seriously struggled with Authority and American Usage (ouch). My favorite was Up, Simba. I wouldn't have voted for him, but McCain's story and DFW's take on the campaign was interesting. Also liked Host; didn't realize we lived less than a mile from the KFI studio at the time (though I've never heard of them actually)...

Aside from the asides (!), I really do enjoy his writing. Still doubt I'll ever make Infinite Jest though!

( )
  jimmylarue | Sep 23, 2022 |
Favorite essay: "Authority and American Usage". I, like Mr. Wallace, am a snoot. ( )
  Martha_Thayer | Jan 13, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 74 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
For Bonnie Nadell
First words
Quotations
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Se siete annoiati e disgustati dalla politica e non vi disturbate a votare, di fatto votate per gli arroccati establishment dei due principali partiti, i quali … hanno una consapevolezza profonda di quanto gli convenga mantenervi in una condizione di disgusto e noia e cinismo … Sia chiaro: avete tutto il diritto di stare a casa, se volete, ma non prendetevi in giro pensando di non votare. In realtà, non votare è impossibile: si può votare votando, oppure votare rimanendo a casa e raddoppiando tacitamente il valore del voto di un irriducibile.
Essere turisti di massa, per me, significa diventare puri americani dell'ultimo tipo: alieni, ignoranti, smaniosi di qualcosa che non si potrà mai avere, delusi come non si potrà mai ammettere di essere … Significa imporre la propria presenza in luoghi che sarebbero, in tutti i sensi non-economici, migliori e più veri senza di noi … come turisti, diventiamo economicamente rilevanti ma esistenzialmente deprecabili, insetti su una cosa morta.
[John Powers]: «… la proliferazione di blurb nei trailer cinematografici ha fatto sembrare tutti i critici o degli idioti o degli agenti pubblicitari …»
La domanda sconvolgente … è perché mai dovrebbe essere divertente ascoltare gente che viene portata con l'inganno a offendersi e agitarsi sempre più. Non sembra esserci una risposta valida. A un certo punto bisogna semplicemente chinare la testa e accettare che certi americani si divertono con cose per le quali a qualsiasi persona sana di mente vorrebbe voglia di tagliarsi le vene. Ci sono, dopotutto, adulti statunitensi del tutto efficienti cui piace la televisione evangelica, il canale delle televendite e la musica per ascensori. Si chiama Avventura democratica.
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
For this collection, Wallace immerses himself in the three-ring circus that is the presidential race in order to document one of the most vicious campaigns in recent history. Later he strolls from booth to booth at a lobster festival in Maine and risks life and limb to get to the bottom of the lobster question. Then he wheedles his way into an L.A. radio studio, armed with tubs of chicken, to get the behind-the-scenes view of a conservative talk show featuring a host with an unnatural penchant for clothing that looks good only on the radio. Do lobsters feel pain? Did Franz Kafka have a sick sense of humor? What is John Updike's deal anyway? And who won the Adult Video News' Female Performer of the Year Award the same year Gwyneth Paltrow won her Oscar? Wallace answers these questions and more.--From publisher description.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Legacy Library: David Foster Wallace

David Foster Wallace has a Legacy Library. Legacy libraries are the personal libraries of famous readers, entered by LibraryThing members from the Legacy Libraries group.

See David Foster Wallace's legacy profile.

See David Foster Wallace's author page.

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.13)
0.5 1
1 6
1.5 2
2 27
2.5 4
3 123
3.5 26
4 390
4.5 63
5 312

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 204,759,630 books! | Top bar: Always visible