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The Mystery of Edwin Drood (1870)

by Charles Dickens

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
2,873534,071 (3.6)1 / 262
Edwin Drood is contracted to marry Orphan Rosa, but they break the engagement off-and soon afterwards Edwin disappears. Is it murder? And is his jealous uncle-a sinister choirmaster with a double life and designs on Rosa-the killer? Dickens died before completing the story, leaving the mystery unsolved and encouraging successive generations of readers to turn detective. In addition to its tantalizing crime, the novel also offers a characteristically Dickensian mix of the fantastical world of the imagination and a vibrantly journalistic depiction of gritty reality. This edition features a new critical introduction that assesses the evidence to show whether the mystery can truly be solved, as well as a chronology, illustrations, appendixes (including one on opium use in the nineteenth century). Edited with an introduction and notes by David Paroissien.… (more)
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» See also 262 mentions

English (51)  Spanish (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (53)
Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
I read this book for no other reason than curiosity. I knew beforehand that it hadn’t been finished, but I just had to know! I loved the beginning and I loved the direction it was going. The characters, the creepiness, the setting- everything was so good. I of course have my own ideas of what happened and I look forward to spinning those ideas around in my head to finish the story as best I can. ( )
  EmilyRaible | Sep 27, 2022 |
Loved this. I knew going in that the plot would end unfinished, but the characters Dickens created, right up to the last couple of chapters he completed, are memorable and eccentric in ways that I love.
  BionicJim | Jun 29, 2022 |
4/26/22
  laplantelibrary | Apr 26, 2022 |
Dickens' last unfinished mystery. Definitive research has it that Dickens planned to blame it on George Bush & Osama Bin Laden. ( )
  tENTATIVELY | Apr 3, 2022 |
I didn't end up reading the whole thing, as I found it dry and uninteresting. I had the audio version and the reader didn't help. ( )
  Wren73 | Mar 4, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (40 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dickens, Charlesprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aydin, IsilTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Browne, Hablot K.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cardwell, MargaretEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Collins, CharlesIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fildes, LukeIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lehmusoksa, RistoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lehtonen, PaavoAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Paroissien, DavidEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Piffard, HaroldIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Roberts, Sydney CastleIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thorn, DavidNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, AngusIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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An ancient English Cathedral Tower?
Original manuscript: An ancient English Cathedral Town?
Quotations
A drowsy city, Cloisterham, whose inhabitants seem to suppose, with an inconsistency more strange than rare, that all its changes lie behind it, and that there are no more to come. A queer moral to derive from antiquity, yet older than any traceable antiquity.
"Is there anything new down in the crypt, Durdles?" asks John Jasper.

"Anything old, I think you mean," growls Durdles. "It ain't a spot for novelty."
Last words
Disambiguation notice
PLEASE NOTE: The D. Case: The Truth About The Mystery of Edwin Drood is a separate book and should not be combined with The Mystery of Edwin Drood.

The D. Case is a completion of Dickens' incomplete novel, and was collaborated on by two other writers. This is not the same as Charles Dickens' book. Although Dickens' entire text is included, the additional material is more than Dickens' contribution. Please do not combine these two works.

Do not combine with any edition which has been "completed" by another author.
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Edwin Drood is contracted to marry Orphan Rosa, but they break the engagement off-and soon afterwards Edwin disappears. Is it murder? And is his jealous uncle-a sinister choirmaster with a double life and designs on Rosa-the killer? Dickens died before completing the story, leaving the mystery unsolved and encouraging successive generations of readers to turn detective. In addition to its tantalizing crime, the novel also offers a characteristically Dickensian mix of the fantastical world of the imagination and a vibrantly journalistic depiction of gritty reality. This edition features a new critical introduction that assesses the evidence to show whether the mystery can truly be solved, as well as a chronology, illustrations, appendixes (including one on opium use in the nineteenth century). Edited with an introduction and notes by David Paroissien.

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Book description
Who killed Edwin Drood? Was it his opium-addict uncle, John Jasper, or the brooding Neville Landless? Was it an act of jealous passion or was it prompted by a darker, more onimous evil? Or was the vanished young man actually dead at all? When Charles Dickens died in 1870, The Mystery of Edwin Drood became doubly mysterious, and questions left unanswered in his tantalizing last manuscript have tortured readers ever since.
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Current discussions

Would you Drood with me? *Spoilers May Lurk Here* in The Green Dragon

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140439269, 014119992X

 

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