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Nicomachean ethics

by Aristoteles

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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8,87750734 (3.86)64
This new edition of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics is an accurate, readable and accessible translation of one of the world's greatest ethical works. Based on lectures Aristotle gave in Athens in the fourth century BCE, Nicomachean Ethics is one of the most significant works in moral philosophy, and has profoundly influenced the whole course of subsequent philosophical endeavour. It offers seminal, practically oriented discussions of many central ethical issues, including the role of luck in human well-being, moral education, responsibility, courage, justice, moral weakness, friendship and pleasure, with an emphasis on the exercise of virtue as the key to human happiness. This second edition offers an updated editor's introduction and suggestions for further reading, and incorporates the line numbers as well as the page numbers of the Greek text. With its emphasis on accuracy and readability, it will enable readers without Greek to come as close as possible to Aristotle's work.… (more)
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    mcaution: Virtue ethics gets its best defense and fullest exposition.
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    The Virtue of Selfishness by Ayn Rand (mcaution)
    mcaution: A new morality grounded completely in reason, based upon the facts of reality. Presents "selfishness" in proper context and does away with its common false dichotomy.
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» See also 64 mentions

English (40)  Catalan (3)  Spanish (2)  French (2)  Dutch (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (50)
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
Aristotle explores principles for living the good life. He defines “the good” as that which all things strive for. Since the reason we ultimately do everything is to be happy, he equates happiness with the good. But he admits that’s trite and ventures into a deeper exploration that ultimately comes to happiness being a long-term state of being of living through virtue. Virtue is a relation we have to what we encounter in life that decides our action, and Aristotle argues for taking the middle, median approach. When we face fear, we shouldn’t be reckless or cowardly, but courageous, which is between the two. When we are holding banquets (as one does), we shouldn’t be cheap with ceremonies or too extravagant, but somewhere in between. Amusement and relaxation are important to continue on with life, but not too much of it. Much of the activity he cites involves public life and reputation, which probably relates to how important the public sphere was in Athens at the time.

If you think all that sounds dense, try reading the text, or his lectures on Physics. I took some things from this. It’s helped me shake off some residual purist standards I had for myself. That said, it took me awhile to read this one effectively. Recommended for people who like to read philosophy.
( )
  100sheets | Jun 7, 2021 |
The kind of book you wish you had read a long time ago.

I was privileged enough to get to read the Cambridge Crisp translation (the one I recommend) 0521632218

And also the Oxford, Ross Translation which is also pretty good. ( )
  SeekingApatheia | Apr 13, 2021 |
On a first read, while I was able to appreciate the harmony of Aristotle's writing, it made me feel that his Ethics were not well described "in practice". How can I achieve that mean?, how do I know I am doing well?, etc. ( )
  Adrianmb | Mar 23, 2021 |
NA
  pszolovits | Feb 3, 2021 |
This guy's an idiot. This is how the average person thinks the world works. Instead of using any real logic he manipulates his conclusions by making random analogies and makes judgemental statements without defining his terms. Every sentence contains a huge gap in logic. ( )
  celestialfarmer | Feb 1, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 40 (next | show all)
The volume before us is much more than a translation. The translators, Robert C. Bartlett, who teaches Hellenic politics at Boston College, and Susan D. Collins, a political scientist at the University of Houston, have provided helpful aids. ... Together these bring the original text within the compass of every intelligent reader.
 

» Add other authors (88 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Aristotelesprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Apostle, Hippocrates G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ķemere, InāraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bons, J.A.E.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Broadie, SarahEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brown, LesleyEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chase, D. P.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gray, AntonyTypesettersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Griffith, TomEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Knuuttila, SimoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Martínez Manzano, TeresaForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ophuijsen. J. M. vanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ostwald, MartinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pallí Bonet, JulioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pannier, ChristineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Peters, F. H.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rackham, HarrisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ross, W. D.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rowe, C. J.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Selina, TonyCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smith, J. A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thomson, J. A. K.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verhaeghe, JeanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Warrington, Johneditor and translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Watt, StephenIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zariņš, VilnisForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Every practical science has an end.
Why read the Ethics?

--Introduction
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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This is Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethice in translation. Do not combine with editions including the Ancient Greek text.
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This new edition of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics is an accurate, readable and accessible translation of one of the world's greatest ethical works. Based on lectures Aristotle gave in Athens in the fourth century BCE, Nicomachean Ethics is one of the most significant works in moral philosophy, and has profoundly influenced the whole course of subsequent philosophical endeavour. It offers seminal, practically oriented discussions of many central ethical issues, including the role of luck in human well-being, moral education, responsibility, courage, justice, moral weakness, friendship and pleasure, with an emphasis on the exercise of virtue as the key to human happiness. This second edition offers an updated editor's introduction and suggestions for further reading, and incorporates the line numbers as well as the page numbers of the Greek text. With its emphasis on accuracy and readability, it will enable readers without Greek to come as close as possible to Aristotle's work.

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

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