HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

On the Social Contract (1762)

by Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Bibliothèque philosophique

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,936441,840 (3.59)42
With the publication of The Social Contract in 1761, Jean-Jacques Rousseau took his place among the leading political philosophers of the Enlightenment. Like his contractarian predecessors (Thomas Hobbes and John Locke), Rousseau sought to ground his political theory in an understanding of human nature, which he believed to be basically good but corrupted by the conflicting interests within society. Here self-interest degenerated into a state of war from which humanity could only be extricated by the imposition of a contract. As a party to the compact, each individual would find his true interest served within the political expression of the community of man, or the "general will." What is the content of human nature and how does it compel mankind to come together to create a civil society? What form does this society take? What benefits does it offer its citizens, and what must each individual sacrifice to reap its rewards? How does sovereign power manifest itself, and what consequences follow for those who choose not to abide by the "general will"? Does Rousseau's political theory set forth a blueprint for democracy-one that results in equality, universal suffrage, and popular sovereignty-or is it a recipe for central state totalitarianism? These are just a few of the complex questions that will confront readers of The Social Contract. Whatever their intent or ultimate result, Jean-Jacques Rousseau's views on the state and man's relationship to it have culminated in one of the most powerful and compelling pieces of political philosophy ever written. Book jacket.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 42 mentions

English (26)  Spanish (6)  French (3)  Catalan (3)  Portuguese (Portugal) (2)  Portuguese (Brazil) (2)  Dutch (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (44)
Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
8475200931
  archivomorero | Jun 22, 2022 |
2/28/22
  laplantelibrary | Feb 28, 2022 |
2/28/22
  laplantelibrary | Feb 28, 2022 |
If you're building a new nation state there are better books for you to read - for example any history book. This is interesting analysis but based on nothing other than author's opinions and imaginings validated neither by science nor by observation. ( )
  Paul_S | Dec 23, 2020 |
Okuması zor bir kitap oldu bennim için. Kitabın en az yarısında anlatılanı kavrayamadım ama anladığım kısımlar benim için çok faydalı oldu. Kitapta bahsedilen konular üzerine kapsamlı bir araştırma yaptıktan sonra kitabı tekrar okumayı planlıyorum. ( )
  Tobizume | Jun 9, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 26 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (132 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Rousseau, Jean-JacquesAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Burgelin, PierreIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cole, G. D. H.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Halbwachs, MauriceEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Roermund, G. vanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
My purpose is to consider if, in political society, there can be any legitimate and sure principle of government, taking men as they are and laws as they might be.
Quotations
Man was born free, and he is everywhere in chains.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

With the publication of The Social Contract in 1761, Jean-Jacques Rousseau took his place among the leading political philosophers of the Enlightenment. Like his contractarian predecessors (Thomas Hobbes and John Locke), Rousseau sought to ground his political theory in an understanding of human nature, which he believed to be basically good but corrupted by the conflicting interests within society. Here self-interest degenerated into a state of war from which humanity could only be extricated by the imposition of a contract. As a party to the compact, each individual would find his true interest served within the political expression of the community of man, or the "general will." What is the content of human nature and how does it compel mankind to come together to create a civil society? What form does this society take? What benefits does it offer its citizens, and what must each individual sacrifice to reap its rewards? How does sovereign power manifest itself, and what consequences follow for those who choose not to abide by the "general will"? Does Rousseau's political theory set forth a blueprint for democracy-one that results in equality, universal suffrage, and popular sovereignty-or is it a recipe for central state totalitarianism? These are just a few of the complex questions that will confront readers of The Social Contract. Whatever their intent or ultimate result, Jean-Jacques Rousseau's views on the state and man's relationship to it have culminated in one of the most powerful and compelling pieces of political philosophy ever written. Book jacket.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.59)
0.5 1
1 11
1.5 3
2 38
2.5 11
3 138
3.5 26
4 162
4.5 8
5 86

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0140442014, 0141018887

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 176,758,845 books! | Top bar: Always visible