HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Intercom Conspiracy (1969)

by Eric Ambler

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Charles Latimer (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1712122,811 (3.39)12
Now a successful, bestselling author on the trail of a new book, Latimer steps in to help Theodore Carter, the hapless, hard-drinking editor of Intercom, a small, international political newspaper, investigate his bosses and the sources of the secrets he's publishing. It was recently purchased by two magnates who are, unbeknownst to the frazzled Carter, chief intelligence officers in two minor NATO countries. Not all of Intercom's readers are happy with some recent stories, which are surprisingly more truthful and a lot more dangerous than the rumors and fictions that used to fill its pages--and some of those readers will go to any length to keep their secrets safe. As Latimer and Carter get closer to the truth, they realize they're jeopardizing more than just their careers.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 12 mentions

Showing 2 of 2
A not altogether successful attempt by Eric Ambler to engage in a sort of modernist form. Multiple perspectives, differing mediums of reporting, and an unsure authorial voice are the result. It's still an interesting read, but once again I think Ambler was influenced by developments in feature filmmaking. This story seems to combine the surface imagery and technique of cinema verite with a final ambiguity that is frustrating--intentionally so. The Charles Latimer that has returned in 1969 is drastically different from the befuddled but well centered detailer of the narrative that was Latimer in 1939 in A Coffin for Dimitrios.

This book is indicative of its age, the late 1960s, even as Charles Latimer has himself aged into an old man. The moral certainties of the interwar years of the 1930s no longer exist. Cold War hijinks can be murderous. And they can yield comic results, even as they do result in killing and destruction. ( )
  PaulCornelius | Apr 12, 2020 |
Eric Ambler achieved considerable commercial and critical success during the 1930s and 1940s as the author of pacy spy thrillers, with novels such as ‘The Mask of Dimitrios’ and ‘Journey Into Fear’. Although nowadays they might seem rather insubstantial and fanciful, at the time of publication they were feted for what was seen as their gritty reality.

‘The Intercom Conspiracy’ marked a departure from the action thriller into new, more theoretical territory. Two heads of counterintelligence departments in neighbouring Scandinavian countries fear that their respective imminent retirements might be spent in little better than penury, and begin to explore how they might alleviate such a depressing state of affairs. They hit upon the idea of creating such a nuisance for their intelligence counterparts around the world, on either side of the Iron Curtain, by drip feeding nuggets of military intelligence, of fluctuating value, with a view to being paid off for their future silence. They select ‘Intercom’, a technical newsletter that was until recently owned by a cranky American ex-General, as the conduit for their leaks. As the novel opens, the general has just died, and Intercom is up for sale.

The novel takes the form of a series of narratives from various characters who bore the brunt of the fallout from the protagonists’ scheme, principally Theodore Carter, the disgruntled and dishevelled editor of Intercom, and his daughter. The format is clever, and deftly handled, with the different narratives reflecting the contrasting styles and perspectives of each writer. Sadly, however, after a sound start, the plot grinds to a halt, bowed down by the weight of its own intricacy. ( )
  Eyejaybee | Oct 11, 2016 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Eric Amblerprimary authorall editionscalculated
Stössel, DietrichTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Belongs to Series

Belongs to Publisher Series

detebe (75/10)
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Also, liebe Nicole, und jetzt den Brief an Latimer.
Quotations
Last words
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Now a successful, bestselling author on the trail of a new book, Latimer steps in to help Theodore Carter, the hapless, hard-drinking editor of Intercom, a small, international political newspaper, investigate his bosses and the sources of the secrets he's publishing. It was recently purchased by two magnates who are, unbeknownst to the frazzled Carter, chief intelligence officers in two minor NATO countries. Not all of Intercom's readers are happy with some recent stories, which are surprisingly more truthful and a lot more dangerous than the rumors and fictions that used to fill its pages--and some of those readers will go to any length to keep their secrets safe. As Latimer and Carter get closer to the truth, they realize they're jeopardizing more than just their careers.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.39)
0.5
1
1.5
2 3
2.5 1
3 5
3.5 4
4 3
4.5
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 158,897,996 books! | Top bar: Always visible