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Dragonwings (1975)

by Laurence Yep

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2,198306,293 (3.55)1 / 23
In the early twentieth century a young Chinese boy joins his father in San Francisco and helps him realize his dream of making a flying machine.
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 World Reading Circle: Dragonwings, Laurence Yep2 unread / 2mirrani, September 2013

» See also 23 mentions

English (29)  Dutch (1)  All languages (30)
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
In the beginning, all is strangeness to Moon Shadow as he leaves the Middle Kingdom to join his father in the Land of the Golden Mountain. . . only to end up in the Tang people's quarter of San Francisco where the drunken "demons" often beat up Tang men and his uncle Black Dog, an opium smoker and a crook, keeps the family all too involved with the brotherhoods.

Later, Moon Shadow actually makes friends with a red-faced demon, the doughty Mrs. Whitlaw, and lives in the demon part of town until the earthquake comes. But this is mostly the story of Moon Shadow's devotion to his dreamer father, who is given the name Windrider by the Dragon King himself in a vision and who fulfills his destiny by building, at enormous sacrifice, a twelve horsepower airplane similar to the one the Wrights had flown only a few years before. Windrider (based loosely on an actual Chinese-American aviator) is a fascinating figure who believes deeply in the old myths and is entranced by the new magic of electricity, motor cars and aeronautics. Other elements, such as Moon Shadow's rapprochement with Mrs. Whit. law—he learns to drink a disgusting substance called cow's milk, she rethinks her old ideas about dragons—depend more on familiar tensions and humorous accommodations. Even so, this is a realm of exprience almost unknown to us demons.

And the dream that becomes the plane Dragonwings lifts this into a world where truth and imagination are one.

-Kirkus Review
  CDJLibrary | Jan 24, 2023 |
Pretty good story from point of young Chinese boy in San Francisco area about 1900 and later. Whites are considered "demons" and often hate the Chinese. He leaves his mother behind to be with his father who wants to build an early airplane. They also experience SF earthquake and fires. ( )
  kslade | Dec 8, 2022 |
"In the beginning, all is strangeness to Moon Shadow as he leaves the Middle Kingdom to join his father in the Land of the Golden Mountain. . . only to end up in the Tang people's quarter of San Francisco where the drunken "demons" often beat up Tang men and his uncle Black Dog, an opium smoker and a crook, keeps the family all too involved with the brotherhoods.

Later, Moon Shadow actually makes friends with a red-faced demon, the doughty Mrs. Whitlaw, and lives in the demon part of town until the earthquake comes. But this is mostly the story of Moon Shadow's devotion to his dreamer father, who is given the name Windrider by the Dragon King himself in a vision and who fulfills his destiny by building, at enormous sacrifice, a twelve horsepower airplane similar to the one the Wrights had flown only a few years before. Windrider (based loosely on an actual Chinese-American aviator) is a fascinating figure who believes deeply in the old myths and is entranced by the new magic of electricity, motor cars and aeronautics. Other elements, such as Moon Shadow's rapprochement with Mrs. Whit. law—he learns to drink a disgusting substance called cow's milk, she rethinks her old ideas about dragons—depend more on familiar tensions and humorous accommodations. Even so, this is a realm of exprience almost unknown to us demons.

And the dream that becomes the plane Dragonwings lifts this into a world where truth and imagination are one." www.kirkusreviews.com, A Kirkus Starred Review
  CDJLibrary | Mar 3, 2022 |
In the beginning, all is strangeness to Moon Shadow as he leaves the Middle Kingdom to join his father in the Land of the Golden Mountain. . . only to end up in the Tang people's quarter of San Francisco where the drunken "demons" often beat up Tang men and his uncle Black Dog, an opium smoker and a crook, keeps the family all too involved with the brotherhoods.

Later, Moon Shadow actually makes friends with a red-faced demon, the doughty Mrs. Whitlaw, and lives in the demon part of town until the earthquake comes. But this is mostly the story of Moon Shadow's devotion to his dreamer father, who is given the name Windrider by the Dragon King himself in a vision and who fulfills his destiny by building, at enormous sacrifice, a twelve horsepower airplane similar to the one the Wrights had flown only a few years before. Windrider (based loosely on an actual Chinese-American aviator) is a fascinating figure who believes deeply in the old myths and is entranced by the new magic of electricity, motor cars and aeronautics. Other elements, such as Moon Shadow's rapprochement with Mrs. Whit. law—he learns to drink a disgusting substance called cow's milk, she rethinks her old ideas about dragons—depend more on familiar tensions and humorous accommodations. Even so, this is a realm of experience almost unknown to us demons.

And the dream that becomes the plane Dragonwings lifts this into a world where truth and imagination are one.
  CDJLibrary | Mar 3, 2022 |
In the early twentieth century a young Chinese boy joins his father in San Francisco and helps him realize his dream of making a flying machine.
  BLTSbraille | Oct 30, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
Ch'ien, the first hexagram of the Book of Changes "The dragon takes wing through the sky. Superior people bestir themselves to action."
Dedication
To my mother and father, to whom I owe a debt othat would last through several lives
First words
Ever since I can remember, I had wanted to know about the Land of the Golden Mountain, but my mother had never wanted to talk about it.
Quotations
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Disambiguation notice
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In the early twentieth century a young Chinese boy joins his father in San Francisco and helps him realize his dream of making a flying machine.

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Book description
Teens (grades 6+)
YE 65.3
1975
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