HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Separation by Christopher Priest
Loading...

The Separation (2002)

by Christopher Priest

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4772032,747 (3.78)36

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 36 mentions

English (14)  French (6)  All languages (20)
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
Inception : A dream within a dream.
The Separation : Delusions within a delusion.

I completely second this review ( )
  supercoldd | Aug 27, 2015 |
Every time I try to review this I get bogged down in retelling the plot, so I've decided to try something simpler. I like 'alternate history,' I loved Priest's 'The Prestige,' and I was really looking forward to reading this. Ultimately I found it disappointing and confusing. It might be a book that benefits from multiple readings, but there's nothing in it that makes me want to read it again. ( )
  wjohnston | May 7, 2013 |
I gave this a good long chance, but around a hundred pages in I was still completely underwhelmed. I've heard good things about Christopher Priest, so maybe this just isn't the right book for me. On the other hand, maybe he just isn't the right writer for me.

I skimmed a bunch of other reviews, and then the end of the book, and just -- really, it doesn't sound like it does anything particularly interesting. Alternate histories can be fascinating, but it doesn't sound like Christopher Priest ever commits to one idea and runs with it. The cop-out end with the implication that it was all or mostly a hallucination just, ugh. ( )
  shanaqui | Apr 9, 2013 |
In which Christopher Priest continues his obsessions with doubles and unreliable narrators. There's maybe half a really good book here scattered among the various sections/plot-lines, but the other parts drag a bit too much. ( )
1 vote g026r | Nov 25, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Christopher Priestprimary authorall editionscalculated
Charrier, MichelleTraductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To Paul Kincaid
First words
The rain was falling steadily on Buxton that Thursday afternoon in March, the town veiled by drifting low clouds, grey and discouraging.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
The Separation is a 2002 novel by Christopher Priest. It is an alternate history revolving around the experiences of identical twin brothers during the Second World War, during which one becomes a pilot for the RAF, and the other, a conscientious objector, becomes an ambulance driver for the Red Cross.
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

Winner of Arthur C. Clarke Award and British Science Fiction Assoc. Award.

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.78)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 2
2.5 4
3 30
3.5 14
4 36
4.5 8
5 21

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 135,745,568 books! | Top bar: Always visible