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What To Expect The First Year (1993)

by Heidi Murkoff

Other authors: Mark D. Widome (Foreword)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: What to Expect

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,439225,915 (3.62)12
Family & Relationships. Nonfiction. HTML:

Some things about babies, happily, will never change. They still arrive warm, cuddly, soft, and smelling impossibly sweet. But how moms and dads care for their brand-new bundles of baby joy has changed‚??and now, so has the new-baby bible.
Announcing the completely revised third edition of What to Expect the First Year. With over 10.5 million copies in print, First Year is the world's best-selling, best-loved guide to the instructions that babies don't come with, but should. And now, it's better than ever. Every parent's must-have/go-to is completely updated.
Keeping the trademark month-by-month format that allows parents to take the potentially overwhelming first year one step at a time, First Year is easier-to-read, faster-to-flip-through, and new-family-friendlier than ever‚??packed with even more practical tips, realistic advice, and relatable, accessible information than before. Illustrations are new, too.
Among the changes: Baby care fundamentals‚??crib and sleep safety, feeding, vitamin supplements‚??are revised to reflect the most recent guidelines. Breastfeeding gets more coverage, too, from getting started to keeping it going. Hot-button topics and trends are tackled: attachment parenting, sleep training, early potty learning (elimination communication), baby-led weaning, and green parenting (from cloth diapers to non-toxic furniture). An all-new chapter on buying for baby helps parents navigate through today's dizzying gamut of baby products, nursery items, and gear. Also new: tips on preparing homemade baby food, the latest recommendations on starting solids, research on the impact of screen time (TVs, tablets, apps, computers), and "For Parents" boxes that focus on mom's and dad's needs. Throughout, topics are organized more intuitively than ever, for the best user experience po
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» See also 12 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
Stylistically, I would have given this book 1 star, but I did learn some useful information, so that ups it to two.

I had two problems with this book. The smaller is that this book is well organized but badly structured. Everything is clearly labeled. Sections are concise. But the overall structure of the book is kind of random. Each monthly chapter has some special topics that it goes in depth on, but those topics could have really gone anywhere in a 4 month time period. Thus, their actual placement in the book becomes rather arbitrary.

The larger thing I dislike is that the book really focuses on risks and avoiding them. The advice is fairly sound, but if you took it all to heart, you would be constantly obsessing about how the world is going to hurt your child. As parents, it's important for us to understand what risks are worth protecting against actively, which are worth more passive protection, and which are not worth worrying about.

Overall, I do not quite regret reading this book, but I'm glad that I skimmed much of it. ( )
  eri_kars | Jul 10, 2022 |
Some stuff is really helpful, some of it seems like insanity. No, I'm not going to buy two baby gates, one to put at the top of the stairs and one to put at the bottom of the stairs, 3 stairs up so that he can practice stairs safely. That just seems excessive. ( )
  readingjag | Nov 29, 2021 |
Love this book. Saved me a lot of worry and confusion!
  pmichaud | Dec 21, 2020 |
Time Machine
4.0 out of 5 stars I Am Buying A Second Book..., May 12, 2005

I see that there has been a great deal written pro and con about this book. Let me then say just a little more in its favor as well as say why I am buying a second book for my family.

In its favor: We have quite a few baby/toddler/preschooler books on our shelves but this remains one of my favorites for the first year. The main reason is it's readability. It is easy to read and reread-which is something first-time moms tend to do (or at least it's what I did). In particular, I was absorbed by the milestones; alternately pleased or concerned as the months came and went. But what fun to be able enjoy this new aspect of life with my babies.

Book 2 Project: One of things I did as the months passed was to write down when my children reached their milestones. I am buying another book in order to copy my remarks so that I will have one to give to each of my children so that when they have their own babies they can compare and contrast their children's development with what is written in their personal books.

Summary: not all of the information in What to Expect is without controversy. Personally, I don't think that there is anything wrong with the family bed and extended breast feeding. We did one but not the other. In any case, my advice would be to not let any single book be your only source of information. Read, read, read. Go to the library with your newborn. A good habit to develop for later on. Include a healthy dose of Brazelton, Sears, Leach and even Spock in your diet.

And don't be afraid to add this excellent book to your shelves. ( )
  PamFamilyLibrary | Jul 28, 2016 |
Dated information and only useful for those who have never even held a baby before. Even it's use for that purpose is doubtful. ( )
  Mootastic1 | Jan 15, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 22 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Murkoff, HeidiAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Eisenberg, Arlenemain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mazel, SharonAuthormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Widome, Mark D.Forewordsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ballarin, GiovanniTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fontebuoni, AnnaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hathaway, Sandeesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Riva, ElenaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Santarone, MarilisaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Family & Relationships. Nonfiction. HTML:

Some things about babies, happily, will never change. They still arrive warm, cuddly, soft, and smelling impossibly sweet. But how moms and dads care for their brand-new bundles of baby joy has changed‚??and now, so has the new-baby bible.
Announcing the completely revised third edition of What to Expect the First Year. With over 10.5 million copies in print, First Year is the world's best-selling, best-loved guide to the instructions that babies don't come with, but should. And now, it's better than ever. Every parent's must-have/go-to is completely updated.
Keeping the trademark month-by-month format that allows parents to take the potentially overwhelming first year one step at a time, First Year is easier-to-read, faster-to-flip-through, and new-family-friendlier than ever‚??packed with even more practical tips, realistic advice, and relatable, accessible information than before. Illustrations are new, too.
Among the changes: Baby care fundamentals‚??crib and sleep safety, feeding, vitamin supplements‚??are revised to reflect the most recent guidelines. Breastfeeding gets more coverage, too, from getting started to keeping it going. Hot-button topics and trends are tackled: attachment parenting, sleep training, early potty learning (elimination communication), baby-led weaning, and green parenting (from cloth diapers to non-toxic furniture). An all-new chapter on buying for baby helps parents navigate through today's dizzying gamut of baby products, nursery items, and gear. Also new: tips on preparing homemade baby food, the latest recommendations on starting solids, research on the impact of screen time (TVs, tablets, apps, computers), and "For Parents" boxes that focus on mom's and dad's needs. Throughout, topics are organized more intuitively than ever, for the best user experience po

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