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Melmoth the Wanderer (1820)

by Charles Maturin

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
1,4223010,056 (3.75)1 / 184
Written by an eccentric Anglican curate in Dublin, Melmoth Wanderer brought the terrors of the Gothic novel to a new pitch of claustrophobic intensity. Its tormented villain, a Faustian transgressor desperately seeking a victim to release him from his fatal bargain with the devil, regarded by Balzac as one of the great outcasts of modern literature. About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.… (more)
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» See also 184 mentions

English (27)  Spanish (2)  French (1)  All languages (30)
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
I only read the abridged version as the other is considered to be almost unreadable, the short version couldn't have been that much better. Supposedly faustian tale, its been a while since i read it but i don't remember getting much story from it at all. ( )
  wreade1872 | Nov 28, 2021 |
"..starting from the doze in which he had frequently indulged during this long narrative.
'But hear the result' said the pertinacious narrator."


Well i can certainly see why people might have issues with this book but there's lot of good with the bad. The main plot actually takes up about the first 10%, the 45-60% area and the last 10%. The rest are various other tales which are very tenuously connected.

It opens in ireland and is both very Gothic and very funny, in fact Maturin's sense of humour makes sporadic and odd appearances throughout the book.

After the opening and a short tale to add some more atmosphere we jump into 'The Spaniards' story and this is the low point and longest point of the whole thing. Those two appellations are probably not coincidental ;) .
Its a man-vs-institution story and whether its a monastery/convent, mad house, prison, boarding school, police state etc these tales don't have lot of variety to them at least in the broad strokes.
However Maturin is very good at psychology and emotional reactions. Unfortunately this tale is severely undermined by 2 factors. One is that its told by the Spaniard himself, rather eliminating the sense of danger since we know he at least survived, and two its placement.
We know its part of a larger whole and so it takes great focus to stop the 'are we there yet' voice in your head which is waiting for this to intersect the overarching storyline.

The middle section of the book is part of the main plot as i mentioned earlier and this is also one of the most floridly written segments its really good. Then we have two more tales almost back to back.
The 'Gusmans' is a social collapse tale somewhat like Zola's the 'Dram Shop' and 'Elinors' tale or whatever that one was called, is a Gothic romance.
Both of these latter stories are at least a lot shorter than the 'Spaniards' but you might still need to be able to stay in the moment to enjoy them.
Before we finally get back to the main plot for the finish.

Maturins best elements as a writer are his realistic psychology as mentioned before and also his speeches, there are some great speeches by various characters in this. So powerful in fact that Maturin felt the need to add a special disclaimer to say that the opinions expressed by his evil characters where not those of the author :) .

As you can tell it can get very nested, in fact it goes total 'Inception' at times, at one point we have the irish guy listening to the spaniard tell of a story, in which a man is listening to a story about a woman listening to story... how many levels is that :lol . Just hold tight to your totem and lets hope you don't end up in Limbo :) .

I heard once that this was virtually unreadable, glad to say i can disagree. A lot of good parts if not perhaps a great whole. ( )
  wreade1872 | Nov 28, 2021 |
"Era una noche de tormenta en el mundo que teníamos sobre nosotros; y aunque estabamos muy por debajo de la superficie de la tierra, el murmullo del viento que suspiraba por los psadizos me llego al oído como las voces de los difuntos, como las súplicas de los muertos. Involuntariamente fijé los ojos en el manuscrito que debía copiar, y ya no me fue posible apartarlos hasta que no hube concluído su extraordinario contenido". Ch. R. Maturin. ( )
  darioha | Oct 8, 2021 |
Reasons to read: published 1820 (bingo), 1001 books,
Legacy: This book was written by Charles Robert Maturin, an Irish Protestant clergyman (ordained in the Church of Ireland) and a writer of Gothic plays and novels. This is his best known works. According to the editors of 1001 Books..., this book is a transitional novel in literary history. It is the final example of Gothic traditional with key features; wild, remote, or otherwise exotic.
Style: the book is a succession of strange stories, entrapments, dangerous lure. There is the opening of the book where John Melmoth the student goes to his uncle's home. The following stories include; the Tale of the Spaniard, the Tale of the Indians, The Tale of Guzman's Family, and back to the Tale of the Indians.
Characters: John Melmoth, a student who inherits his uncle's money. He also acquires a manuscript which tells the story of an ancestor also called John Melmoth.
Identity; John Melmoth, the ancestor, gained satanic immortality in exchange for his soul. A Faustian bargain. He is seeking his release from this covenant with the devil by seeking another to take his place. The book explores the nature of temptation and torment.
Contribution: the book/author contributed to Poe, Wilde, Baudelaire and others.
Readability: it is long. Each story is interesting but could have been made shorter. There is a lot of descriptive words and it was not always easy to stay engage. I listened to the audible production, narrated by Gerry O'Brien.
Rating 3.6 ( )
  Kristelh | Nov 22, 2020 |
This is a weirdly long book about which to say "I couldn't get into it," but somehow I read all 500+ pages and still feel that way. I love gothic novels, but this one just felt like it went on and on and on ... and on ... and on ... and on ... with stories-within-stories-within-stories and lots of anti-Catholic rhetoric. I don't know. I may just have to try again someday. ( )
  JBD1 | Aug 27, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 27 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (45 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Maturin, Charlesprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Baldick, ChrisIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
GoyaCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grant, DouglasEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Perry, SarahIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sage, VictorEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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In the autumn of 1816, John Melmoth, a student in Trinity College, Dublin, quitted it to attend a dying uncle on whom his hopes for independence chiefly rested.
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Had I been told such a story of another, I would have denounced him as the most reckless and desperate being on earth - yet I was the man. p.212
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Written by an eccentric Anglican curate in Dublin, Melmoth Wanderer brought the terrors of the Gothic novel to a new pitch of claustrophobic intensity. Its tormented villain, a Faustian transgressor desperately seeking a victim to release him from his fatal bargain with the devil, regarded by Balzac as one of the great outcasts of modern literature. About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 014044761X, 0141199296

 

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