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The Double Death of Quincas Water-Bray by…
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The Double Death of Quincas Water-Bray (1959)

by Jorge Amado

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2271379,179 (4.05)11
"Along with The Discovery of America by the Turks, two masterworks by the greatest Brazilian novelist of the twentieth century, published for the centennial of his birth. Widely considered the greatest work by the foremost Brazilian author of the twentieth century, The Double Death of Quincas Water-Bray comes to Penguin Classics in a new translation by the dean of Portuguese-language translators, Gregory Rabassa. It tells the story of Joaquim Soares da Cunha, who drops dead after he abandons his life of upstanding citizenship to assume the identity of Quincas Water-Bray, a "champion drunk" and bum who is whisked along on a postmortem journey that climaxes in his loss at sea"--… (more)
  1. 00
    Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon by Jorge Amado (tcw)
    tcw: as much as Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon portrays the sultry lazy way of a life long since past, The Two deaths of Qunicas Wateryell shows Amado's delicious sense of humor. Read them both!
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» See also 11 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)


Quincas Wateryell’s double life, his wife and children prayed for him after he called them vipers and, without so much as a glance over his shoulder, walked out of his respectable middle-class home forever. And to think, such an obedient, meek husband and father, a former exemplary employee of the State Rent Board; the derelicts, tramps, hobos, gamblers and prostitutes in the squalid neighborhoods of his second life all loved him, their first and foremost shinning star of seedy bar and sailor skiff (Quincas’ great-great grandfather was a captain and Quincas could feel the sea in his blood), through ten glorious years of carousing, marathon card games, rum drinking and thousands of debaucheries, their leader, Daddy, great pal and hero would spin his new life around a squalid flophouse where he would occasionally crash in his bare, dingy room furnished with sagging, moth-eaten cot; leader and pal, Daddy and hero (did I previously mention his roles? If so, it bears repeating), his arms always spread wide, embracing down-and-outers against all odds, his open heart, his warm smile, rum-fueled fire sparkling in his eyes - all this is noble, splendid, spirited, liberating and caused his family endless embarrassment and shame.

A friend recently wrote me saying how another world-renowned author from Brazil couldn’t hold a candle to the storytelling of Jorge Amado. It’s hard to argue with this statement since Jorge's nearly thirty novels, astonishing literary masterpieces loved by millions of readers, from intellectuals and esteemed critics to workers in the field, prove Jorge to be among the world’s foremost storytelling giants.

And please do not underestimate this Jorge Amado novella under review – its less than one hundred pages contain more sheer energy, excitement and euphoria, joy and jubilance than an entire shelf of works many times its length penned by a good number of other authors.

The spirit of wild, intoxicated Dionysius has an undeniable presence on every single page. If you are not yet acquainted with the author, this little gem is the perfect place to imbibe some Jorge Amado storytelling splendor. Set your spirit free!

( )
  Glenn_Russell | Nov 13, 2018 |
[The Double Death of Quincas Water-Bray] by Jorge Amardo
This penguin classics edition is translated by Gregory Rabassa. The story itself reads well for its mere 70 pages and the black humour will entertain many readers. Pass the cachaça and read rebeccanyc’s review ( )
1 vote baswood | Jan 24, 2018 |



Quincas Wateryell’s double life, his wife and children prayed for him after he called them vipers and, without so much as a glance over his shoulder, walked out of his respectable middle-class home forever, and to think, such an obedient, meek husband and father, a former exemplary employee of the State Rend Board; the derelicts, tramps, hobos, gamblers and prostitutes in the squalid neighborhoods of his second life all loved him, their first and foremost shinning star of seedy bar and sailor skiff (Quincas’ great-great grandfather was a captain and Quincas could feel the sea in his blood), through ten glorious years of carousing, marathon card games, rum drinking and thousands of debaucheries, their leader, Daddy, great pal and hero would spin his new life around a squalid flophouse where he would occasionally crash in his bare, dingy room furnished with sagging, moth-eaten cot; leader and pal, Daddy and hero (did I previously mention his roles? If so, it bears repeating), his arms always spread wide, embracing down-and-outers against all odds, his open heart, his warm smile, rum-fueled fire sparkling in his eyes - all this is noble, splendid, spirited, liberating and caused his family endless embarrassment and shame.

A friend recently wrote me saying how another world-renowned author from Brazil couldn’t hold a candle to the storytelling of Jorge Amado. It’s hard to argue with this statement since Jorge's nearly thirty novels, astonishing literary masterpieces loved by millions of readers, from intellectuals and esteemed critics to workers in the field, prove Jorge to be among the world’s foremost storytelling giants. And please do not underestimate this Jorge Amado novella under review – its less than one hundred pages contain more sheer energy, excitement and euphoria, joy and jubilance, than an entire shelf of works of fiction many times its length. The spirit of wild, intoxicated Dionysius has an undeniable presence on every single page. If you are not yet acquainted with the author, this little gem is the perfect place to imbibe some Jorge Amado storytelling splendor. Set your spirit free!

( )
  GlennRussell | Feb 16, 2017 |
Quincas Water-Bray, is dead for the entire book. Really?
He seems to be more alive than all other characters in the story.
Read the book if you like to enjoy his last party. ( )
  Haidji | Oct 1, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jorge Amadoprimary authorall editionscalculated
Collo, PaoloTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Galchen, RivkaIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rabassa, GregoryTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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