HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream

by Barack Obama

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8,353162757 (3.8)244
The junior senator from Illinois discusses how to transform U.S. politics, calling for a return to America's original ideals and revealing how they can address such issues as globalization and the function of religion in public life.
  1. 20
    Renegade: The Making of a President by Richard Wolffe (Furu)
  2. 10
    Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance by Barack Obama (foof2you)
    foof2you: This is Obama's life story and how became the man he is today.
  3. 01
    The Untold History of the United States by Oliver Stone (PlaidStallion)
    PlaidStallion: Obama is a distant descendant of Jefferson Davis (I wonder if on his mother’s or father’s side). From the book:

      Having betrayed his earlier promises and become the first presidential candidate to turn down public camp financing in the general election, Obama turned to Wall Street funders with deep pockets, like Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, Skadden Arps, and Morgan Stanley. Also high on the list of Obama contributors were General Electric and other defense contractors. And the pharmaceuticals industry—Big Pharma—reversed years of supporting Republicans, contributing more than three times as much to Obama as to McCain.

      Obama’s grassroots supporters largely overlooked these disturbing facts. Progressives projected onto him their own hopes and expectations, conservatives their worst fears. Both were mistaken. He ran a centrist campaign, advancing safely pragmatic policy initiatives. He consistently championed the middle class. The working class and the poor—black, Hispanic, Asian, Native American and white—seemed an afterthought as Obama battled Hillary Clinton and then John McCain. Instead of seizing the opportunity to explain how the decline of manufacturing and other structural factors at the heart of a dysfunctional corporate- and Wall Street-dominated system had exacerbated the problems for all poor people and especially African Americans, he hectored poor blacks for not taking more “personal responsibility.” He positioned himself to the left of Clinton by trumpeting his opposition to the Iraq War, which she had voted to support, but to the right of George Bush on Afghanistan, a position his supporters conveniently ignored. And his Senate vote for the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which gave legal immunity to telecommunications companies complicit in Bush’s wiretapping, should have signaled that he might be unwilling to relinquish some of the powers that Bush and Cheney had appropriated.
    … (more)
  4. 14
    The Manchurian Candidate by Richard Condon (Anonymous user)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 244 mentions

English (154)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (2)  Catalan (1)  Danish (1)  Arabic (1)  German (1)  All languages (162)
Showing 1-5 of 154 (next | show all)
While admittedly not as good as his first book, Dreams From My Father, and certainly less personal, The Audacity of Hope is still an interesting read following Obama in the run to what would be his election and eventual 2-term presidency in 2008. Instead of focusing on his life, it mainly centers around his political opinions without giving many straight-forward answers, preferring to take more of an "it's complicated" approach to a lot of issues, and it's interesting to look back on his presidency and compare it to his writings here. I would recommend Dreams From My Father and his wife Michelle Obama's book, Becoming, for more intimate and relatable stories about the people rather than the politicians. By this point, a book about the politics feels quite dated. ( )
  TMLbuds34 | Aug 13, 2021 |
It's now 2021 and I'm finally getting around to this before I tackle his latest book. There are some "timing" things that jump out. Osama bin Laden is referred to in the present tense, Obamacare is not mentioned and Reverend Wright is his pastor. My guess is they make major appearances in the next book, or for both men, should I say disappearances. This is actually Senator Obama as presidential want-a-be, of course he never even mentions that possibility. There's one overriding message - we know we can do better. It's a simple proposition that Obama bases his pitch on. Corny but compelling. I wanted more. The goals are clearly laid out, the hope is there but the policies to get us there are more like we can work this out if we just talk to one another empathetically. Details to be filled in later. I felt he was signing to the choir. Inspiring but not informative.

We get some more detail about life with Michelle, Malia and Sasha. But nothing about law school or any of the time he spent as a practicing attorney. Yes he was President of Harvard Law Review but we never learn what happened, what he learned, etc. He's clearly a thoughtful and learned person. We hear about how his family taught him different things, but what did Harvard and Columbia do to form him, nothing? We do learn a bit more about his mother in this book - her absence in the first book was noteworthy. One guesses this was a reflection of her not spending as much time with him as he would have liked.

On to "A Promised Land." ( )
  Ed_Schneider | Apr 10, 2021 |
Mike Dorning, Chicago Tribune -- "An upbeat view of the country's potential and a political biography that concentrates on the senator's core values."
  Doranms | Feb 22, 2021 |
Had I read this book while I still didn't know Barack Obama, I'd sure have been impressed. Here is a book that almost totally agrees with all of my political ideas. Now that Obama is president, however, not much in the book was new to me. I know our president and how he feels about issues pretty well. I'd have given this book 5 stars if it had to do with only political ideas. The truth, though, is that it only gets 3.5 stars as I didn't find what I already knew very stimulating as reading material. ( )
  SqueakyChu | Feb 20, 2021 |
I had to. I just had to. After the horribly awful election last week, I had to listen to this book. I had bought it years ago but it had sat on my shelf. After the election, I grabbed the audiobook from my library's OverDrive site and sped through Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico listening to it.

My first reaction was incredible sadness that this man will no longer be our president in a few short months. His thoughts on government, politics, and America are uniquely intelligent, empathetic, measured, and reasonable. They make sense, and I dearly needed some sense this past week.

Ultimately, I also felt hope, because this man is and was my president, and had worked to make our country better -- not just for the rich and privileged, but for everybody. And I have hope because he showed that most people just want the same things, and that we can all find common ground. ( )
  wisemetis | Dec 7, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 154 (next | show all)
Barack Obama, the junior senator from Illinois and the Democratic Party’s new rock star, is that rare politician who can actually write — and write movingly and genuinely about himself.
 

» Add other authors (14 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Obama, BarackAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dierlamm, HelmutTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schäfer, UrselTranslatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dorado, ErwinNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Obama, BarackNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To the women who raised me - my maternal grandmother, Tutu, who's been a rock of stability throughout my life, and my mother, whose loving spirit sustains me still.
First words
On most days, I enter the Capitol through the basement.
It's been almost ten years since I first ran for political office.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
The junior senator from Illinois discusses how to transform U.S. politics, calling for a return to America's original ideals and revealing how they can address such issues as globalization and the function of religion in public life.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.8)
0.5 2
1 25
1.5 3
2 58
2.5 19
3 337
3.5 72
4 564
4.5 51
5 297

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Canongate Books

An edition of this book was published by Canongate Books.

» Publisher information page

Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

» Publisher information page

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 162,317,742 books! | Top bar: Always visible