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The Education of Henry Adams

by Henry Adams

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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2,621424,788 (3.75)121
If you are either learning Romanian, or learning English as a second language (ESL) as a Romanian speaker, this book is for you. There are many editions of The Education of Henry Adams. This one is worth the price if you would like to enrich your Romanian-English vocabulary, whether for self-improvement or for preparation in advanced of college examinations. Each page is annotated with a mini-thesaurus of uncommon words highlighted in the text. Not only will you experience a great classic, but learn the richness of the English language with Romanian synonyms at the bottom of each page. You will not see a full translation of the English text, but rather a running bilingual thesaurus to maximize the reader's exposure to the subtleties of both languages.… (more)
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» See also 121 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 42 (next | show all)
superb book
  ddonahue | Nov 30, 2022 |
I'd first heard of Adams in Gore Vidal's novel "Empire". That novel introduced me to people like John Hay, Secretary to Lincoln, and later Secretary of State itself. These memoirs enlightened me about the stellar politician John Hay was, thanks to the lifelong friendship between Adams and Hay.
Adams centres his memoirs on his rather barren quest to find meaning and understanding through "education". This theme tends to become tiresome.
Adams' period as Private Secretary to his father, First Minister to Great Britain during the Civil War, is especially revealing. How close the British were to declaring for the Confederacy surprised me. Similarly, how surprised were the British by the Union's successes.
He is fully admiring of John Hay, to whom he gives credit for advancing American skill and intelligence in the diplomatic manoeuvrings that produced an alliance, or at least a commonality of understanding, between Britain, France, Germany and USA at the beginning of the Twentieth Century.
I was a little confused by Adams' dynamic theory of history, but then so was he by the seismic shifts brought about by particle physics and the industrial behemoth.
Adams' life was his ever-flowering education.
  ivanfranko | Aug 18, 2022 |
Adams was born in 1838 into a family that had made American history, but his role was to be that of an observer, from the Civil War up to 1905. Perhaps the most interesting section comes early on, when Henry was serving as secretary to his father, who was US minister to Britain during the Civil War. Adams' discussion of Britain's role in that conflict broke new ground for me: I knew much of the British establishment supported the South, but I didn't know how close the Liberal Government came to recognizing the South as a country. Henry was in Washington during the Grant Administration, and his view of Grant is highly negative. He was also an intimate observer in the 1890's. Sometimes Adams' negativity (about himself more than anything else) becomes burdensome, and one misses the personal element. Still, this is key reading for those interested in the period. ( )
  annbury | May 20, 2022 |
Henry Adams, the grandson of JQ Adams, records the story of his life from the perspective of his search for a proper education. His is a life of privilege, allowing him the time to ponder the world and his role in it without the encumbrance of traditional employment. He questions formal education, like his time at Harvard, and feels most of what is taught is useless at best. Adams, because of his lineage, has a front-row seat to observe the events of the nineteenth century, and at times foresees problems on the world stage. Although he has no need for an income, he does earn money by writing his observations.

I'm glad I read the book. It represents a unique perspective. I didn't think it was particularly well written, but I do acknowledge that he never meant it to be published for a wide distribution. That could explain its rough edges. I found that I needed assistance to get through it, so I approached each chapter by reading a Cliff Notes summary first, just to get my head around where he was heading, then I opened up the LibriVox recording and listened while I was reading. That helped immensely. Recently I read an article that encouraged a reader to stretch themselves every once in a while. This book was once of those times for me. ( )
  peggybr | Sep 4, 2021 |
long autobio put in terms of education rather than deeds
  ritaer | Aug 19, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 42 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (28 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Henry Adamsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Lodge, Henry CabotPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Morris, EdmundIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Under the shadow of Boston State House, turning its back on the house of John Hancock, the little passage called Hancock Avenue runs, or ran, from Beacon Street, skirting the State House grounds, to Mount Vernon Street, on the summit of Beacon Hill; and there, in the third house below Mount Vernon Place, February 16, 1838, a child was born, and christened later by his uncle, the minister of the First Church after the tenets of Boston Unitarianism, as Henry Brooks Adams.
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If you are either learning Romanian, or learning English as a second language (ESL) as a Romanian speaker, this book is for you. There are many editions of The Education of Henry Adams. This one is worth the price if you would like to enrich your Romanian-English vocabulary, whether for self-improvement or for preparation in advanced of college examinations. Each page is annotated with a mini-thesaurus of uncommon words highlighted in the text. Not only will you experience a great classic, but learn the richness of the English language with Romanian synonyms at the bottom of each page. You will not see a full translation of the English text, but rather a running bilingual thesaurus to maximize the reader's exposure to the subtleties of both languages.

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Haiku summary
President's grandson
writes a verdict on his life:
No education
(Muscogulus)

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