HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Crisis on Infinite Earths (1985)

by Marv Wolfman, Marc Guggenheim (Author)

Other authors: Tom Derenick (Penciller), Tom Grummett (Pennciller), Danny Miki (Inker), Andy Owens (Inker), Trevor Scott (Inker)

Series: DC Comics Crisis (1), Crisis on Infinite Earths (collection)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8631519,203 (3.59)6
This is the story that changed the DC Universe forever. A mysterious being known as the Anti-Monitor has begun a crusade across time to bring about the end of all existence. As alternate earths are systematically destroyed, the Monitor quickly assembles a team of super-heroes from across time and space to battle his counterpart and stop the destruction. DC's greatest heroes including Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, and Aquaman, assemble to stop the menace, but as they watch both the Flash and Supergirl die in battle, they begin to wonder if even all of the heroes in the world can stop this destructive force.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
The original gigantic crossover, but a little too all over the place for my tastes. It feels like wolf man was trying to hit every current add character, but rather than making it feel like a vast epic, it just feels like a grab bag of random characters, none of who, ever really make an impact. ( )
  skolastic | Feb 2, 2021 |
"Explain that to me, Harbinger! What happened to my life? I am flesh and blood... I exist... yet I don't exist."

This is a wild read. Originally intended as a sort of business move for DC Comics, who had by that time created so many different versions of characters on so many different Earths (for example, Earth 1, Earth 2, Earth 3, Earth X, Earth Prime, etc) that their DC Universe had become unwieldy, this comic was supposed to tidy things up and reset everything into one, congruent universe setting. I am not well versed in comics, however, so the effect of reading this book was kind of amazing. I encountered pages and pages of characters I just had to assume meant something to other people. After 100 or so pages of this, the effect was to totally destabilize all notions of centralized, unique "superheros."

The existence of this heterogeneity of superheros, some with other worldly powers, some without even that distinction, causes the reader to follow their collective abstraction, since none have the page space to truly stand out. You follow "superhero-ness" as it fights against the evil... wait for it... Anti-monitor. Awesome name, mostly because it drives an entire dialectical plot towards (strangely) Hegelian concepts.

The Monitor is a character who has functioned throughout the ages as a sort of uber-voyeur/arms dealer. He watches every superhero on every planet and collects data on them (and I gather at one point he was selling this data to villains for cash). One could very easily interpret this character as a stand in for the avid comic book reader, only taller. In this particular story, the main baddy is the Monitor's twin brother, established at the beginning of the Universe's creation yet set in an anti-matter sphere. He is the Anti-monitor and he wants to destroy everything. Insert dramatic music and postmodern irony here.

The binary relationships are set and blurred many times over in this novel: superheros decentralize into the collective, super villains fight to retain their Hegelian dialectical relationships with superhero counterparts, thus calling into question their defining motives, the worldly threat (the anti-monitor's desire to condense all reality into a single anti-matter universe, his own) not only ties indirectly to the comic book reader's identity but underscores a weird sort of "negation of the negation."

In short, 1) all concepts in the DC Universe (characters, settings, origins, etc) are shown to have an opposite and opposing side, 2) as the balance between these sides shifts gradually, then suddenly, gradual changes lead to major turning points, which tumble and shift the nature of reality, and 3) all of these turning points develop as a "negation of the negation" and the DC Universe as well as all its characters are changed forever. In this case, consolidated into a unified universe with separate and unique parts (i.e. only one Earth) among other ways.

I definitely do not recommend this to just anyone. You have to either totally be into the world of comics already (in which case, my reading of it will be as bizarre to you as this novel was for me) or willing to really brave out some strange ideas with a huge collection of characters whom you never even knew existed. I liked reading this but only because I loved how campy it was and I found it intellectually engaging (in my own way). ( )
  Adrian_Astur_Alvarez | Dec 3, 2019 |
"Explain that to me, Harbinger! What happened to my life? I am flesh and blood... I exist... yet I don't exist."

This is a wild read. Originally intended as a sort of business move for DC Comics, who had by that time created so many different versions of characters on so many different Earths (for example, Earth 1, Earth 2, Earth 3, Earth X, Earth Prime, etc) that their DC Universe had become unwieldy, this comic was supposed to tidy things up and reset everything into one, congruent universe setting. I am not well versed in comics, however, so the effect of reading this book was kind of amazing. I encountered pages and pages of characters I just had to assume meant something to other people. After 100 or so pages of this, the effect was to totally destabilize all notions of centralized, unique "superheros."

The existence of this heterogeneity of superheros, some with other worldly powers, some without even that distinction, causes the reader to follow their collective abstraction, since none have the page space to truly stand out. You follow "superhero-ness" as it fights against the evil... wait for it... Anti-monitor. Awesome name, mostly because it drives an entire dialectical plot towards (strangely) Hegelian concepts.

The Monitor is a character who has functioned throughout the ages as a sort of uber-voyeur/arms dealer. He watches every superhero on every planet and collects data on them (and I gather at one point he was selling this data to villains for cash). One could very easily interpret this character as a stand in for the avid comic book reader, only taller. In this particular story, the main baddy is the Monitor's twin brother, established at the beginning of the Universe's creation yet set in an anti-matter sphere. He is the Anti-monitor and he wants to destroy everything. Insert dramatic music and postmodern irony here.

The binary relationships are set and blurred many times over in this novel: superheros decentralize into the collective, super villains fight to retain their Hegelian dialectical relationships with superhero counterparts, thus calling into question their defining motives, the worldly threat (the anti-monitor's desire to condense all reality into a single anti-matter universe, his own) not only ties indirectly to the comic book reader's identity but underscores a weird sort of "negation of the negation."

In short, 1) all concepts in the DC Universe (characters, settings, origins, etc) are shown to have an opposite and opposing side, 2) as the balance between these sides shifts gradually, then suddenly, gradual changes lead to major turning points, which tumble and shift the nature of reality, and 3) all of these turning points develop as a "negation of the negation" and the DC Universe as well as all its characters are changed forever. In this case, consolidated into a unified universe with separate and unique parts (i.e. only one Earth) among other ways.

I definitely do not recommend this to just anyone. You have to either totally be into the world of comics already (in which case, my reading of it will be as bizarre to you as this novel was for me) or willing to really brave out some strange ideas with a huge collection of characters whom you never even knew existed. I liked reading this but only because I loved how campy it was and I found it intellectually engaging (in my own way). ( )
  Adrian_Astur_Alvarez | Dec 3, 2019 |
I preface this by saying that I am, and have never been, a comic book reader. Nevertheless my brothers are, and I asked for a recommendation from them. My brother suggested Crisis on Infinite Earths, and loaned me his copy. I found the mere act of reading a comic book to be interesting, if not challenging, in itself. Furthermore, the large cast of characters, their backstories, and subplots make for a tedious read at times. Nevertheless, it was a somewhat enjoyable experience and I would recommend the book (though not to someone who knows little about comics). The art is beautiful for the time, and the constant presence of loss and sacrifice can be keenly felt by any reader. ( )
  oacevedo | Apr 9, 2019 |
I first read Crisis in my childhood and it helped change my vision on comics and at the time I was really impressed with superheroes and super-villains fighting and struggling to survive with several casualties in both sides.

Looking into it now, as an adult, it seems a bit naïve, that "neverending story" plot with a force consuming everyone from all the multiverses, excessive self-consciousines about good and evil and all its stereotypes being even more prominent over the passage of time and the crisis worsening does not sound natural to me, those people would quickly realize that to survive they should stick together and not keep fighting each other.

Also, all was triggered by two never mentioned before characters, the Monitor and the anti-Monitor, kind of an editorial Deus ex machina raised to simplify the DC universe that was so encyclopedic at the time that no writer could remember every aspect of the characters he was involved.

But the story has it's good moments, it's fairly complex, we can see the struggle and death of classic and beloved superheroes like Super Girl and Flash (Barry Allen was cheese, but I liked him and it was very sad to see him dying while trying to save all universes), the sadness of the all universe-orphaned characters like the batman relatives, the older superman etc.

This story definitively changed the way people did comics at the time and it opened the door to giant cross-overs that produced other good and bad stories but also proved that mini-series could be an editorial success and that comics was not forced to keep everything in the regular titles.

Specifically to DC comics, it created some years of coherence and good stories, until the greed for more money made the shift back to the maze it was before populating again the stories with parallel universes and side-lines. ( )
  marcux | Dec 3, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Wolfman, MarvAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Guggenheim, MarcAuthormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Derenick, TomPencillersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Grummett, TomPenncillersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Miki, DannyInkersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Owens, AndyInkersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Scott, TrevorInkersecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
In the beginning there was only one, a single black infinitude
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
This is the story that changed the DC Universe forever. A mysterious being known as the Anti-Monitor has begun a crusade across time to bring about the end of all existence. As alternate earths are systematically destroyed, the Monitor quickly assembles a team of super-heroes from across time and space to battle his counterpart and stop the destruction. DC's greatest heroes including Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, and Aquaman, assemble to stop the menace, but as they watch both the Flash and Supergirl die in battle, they begin to wonder if even all of the heroes in the world can stop this destructive force.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Archive-Quality Slipcase Collection (Includes Poster) - 1st printing. Collects Crisis on Infinite Earths (1985) #1-12. Written by Marv Wolfman. Art by George Perez, Dick Giordano, Jerry Ordway, and Mike DeCarlo. Cover by George Perez and Alex Ross. Includes bonus 21" x 32" poster version of issue # 7 "Death of Supergirl!" Hardcover, (Slipcase), 370 pages, full color. 1998. ISBN: 1-56389-434-3
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.59)
0.5
1 6
1.5
2 19
2.5 5
3 62
3.5 7
4 62
4.5 3
5 43

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 163,239,545 books! | Top bar: Always visible