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Starship Troopers by Robert A. Heinlein
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Starship Troopers (1959)

by Robert A. Heinlein

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9,238155475 (3.88)266
  1. 193
    Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card (5hrdrive)
  2. 163
    The Forever War by Joe Haldeman (goodiegoodie)
  3. 122
    Old Man's War by John Scalzi (goodiegoodie, jlynno84)
  4. 20
    All You Need Is Kill by Hiroshi Sakurazaka (dClauzel)
    dClauzel: Starship Troopers et All You Need Is Kill ont tous les deux la même intensité, avec de brèves périodes de forte violence pour une quête de la recherche du sens.
  5. 00
    The Lazarus War: Artefact by Jamie Sawyer (dClauzel)
    dClauzel: Des soldats dans l’espace. Des extraterrestres. Des armures de combat. Vélocité. Fatal.
  6. 00
    War Stories: New Military Science Fiction by Jaym Gates (dClauzel)
    dClauzel: Des instantanés de guerre, avec des super soldats humains et des technologies déshumanisantes… ou est-ce l’inverse ? Bonus : des extra-terrestres.
  7. 11
    47 Echo by Shawn Kupfer (tottman)
    tottman: This book reminded me of Starship Troopers, without the aliens. A fun, quick, military romp with a healthy suspension of disbelief.
  8. 01
    Brothers in Arms by Ben Weaver (infiniteletters)
  9. 01
    Even Peons are People: Interplanetary Justice by D. Pak (Anonymous user)
    Anonymous user: Interesting thought on the military and their responsibilities in a space travelling society.
  10. 12
    The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells (sturlington)
  11. 01
    Kris Longknife: Mutineer by Mike Shepherd (jlynno84)
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» See also 266 mentions

English (149)  French (5)  Italian (1)  All languages (155)
Showing 1-5 of 149 (next | show all)
An entertaining read, but it loses momentum in parts. ( )
  natcontrary | May 21, 2018 |
After seeing the movie, I thought I should actually read the book. It is NOTHING like the movie. Really. Other than the names and the bugs, and the fact Buenos Aries gets destroyed, nothing like the movie.
Heinlein wrote this during the nuclear arms race with Russia. In a way, it was his treaties on society and government. Heinlein supported nuclear arms. Told from the first person viewpoint, we travel with Rico as he graduates school and joins the Mobile Infantry. In the beginning, Rico spends time under the teaching of Jean Dubois, his History and Moral Philosophy instructor in high school. Heilein used this forum, having his characters discuss the rights of people, the responsibility of government and the governed, and how it should be organized.
But the book isn’t overly philosophical. Most of it is the story of Rico and his journey to naïve, soft, recruit to battleharded man who understands who he is and why he fights. The story of his journey shows us what Heilein believes is required for the right to govern – the sacrifice he believes must be paid.
Many people disagree with Heilein’s ideas – but I do not. I would support this type of government any day. Through action-centered narrative and excellent characterization, Heilein expresses his opinions without pretentious sermonizing or hateful rhetoric. It is through the story itself we see his real ideas. Worth reading for anyone, but particularly those who are interested in a unpopular thesis on government. Warning: Not for the bleeding-hearts or anti-military... ( )
  empress8411 | Apr 9, 2018 |
Turns out I do not enjoy science fiction. This was a good book for sure, but I found it very hard to slug throught it just because I did not find it very interesting.
Just not my cup of tea.
  ChelleBearss | Mar 9, 2018 |
Word of warning. I’m going to discourse both on the book and on the Verhoeven’s movie.

He didn't include them as "grunts" probably because the training was sufficiently hard that most wouldn't have made it. If you read the description of the training it wasn't just 12 weeks square-bashing, it reads far more like Special Forces.

It might also have been because he was paying lip service to a society kind of modelled on 50s America where the ladies were the home-makers and females in the frontline weren't even on the radar.

However, having said that, we have the fabulous line about females in high rank and esteem:

"If the Almighty ever needs a hand to run the universe: hot ship pilot Yvette Deladrier" after Starship commander Deladrier brakes her ship's orbit to recover a lander that has blasted off late and which otherwise would miss rendezvous and all on board would perish. I’ve heard from a lot of my friends saying the movie version is utter shit. I’m not so sure. The thing is, Verhoeven was a master of taking existing texts and subtly pushing them into satire by overdoing Hollywood/MTV filming tropes. The viewer was encouraged to look at the films as broad entertainment and then ask what the actions of the heroes had to do with American culture. He did the same with Joe Eszterhas's scripts for “Basic Instinct” and “Showgirls”. “Basic Instinct” is a detective story where the 'hero' is someone who's already gotten away with murder because of his badge, and who shoots another innocent victim before the film is out, while the 'villain' is never actually shown to kill anyone. She's chiefly a suspect because of her sexuality (which is why GLAAD picketed the film) and lack of shame about it. “Showgirls” meanwhile depicts a vision of Las Vegas as a patriarchal dystopia where every woman is judged on her body and literally every male character is a predator of some kind.

If you're into SF, read the rest of this review on my blog. ( )
  antao | Dec 2, 2017 |
Although slightly interesting as a character study, and more interesting from the POV of how a soldier might be trained and a battle organized, this is almost entirely backstory, with very little plot. ( )
  thesmellofbooks | Nov 21, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 149 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (42 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Robert A. Heinleinprimary authorall editionscalculated
Caldwell, TomCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davies, Gordon C.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Giancola, DonatoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
James, LloydNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lehr, PaulCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lundgren, CarlCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Warhola, JamesCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
To "Sarge" Arthur George Smith - SOLDIER, CITIZEN, SCIENTIST - AND TO ALL SERGEANTS ANYWHERE WHO HAVE LABORED TO MAKE MEN OUT OF BOYS. R.A.H.
First words
I always get the shakes before a drop.
Quotations
Anyone who clings to the historically untrue-and thoroughly immoral-doctrine that 'violence never settles anything' I would advise to conjure up the ghosts of Napoleon Bonaparte and of the Duke of Wellington and let them debate it. The ghost of Hitler could referee, and the jury might well be the Dodo, the Great Auk, and the Passenger Pigeon. Violence, naked force, has settled more issues in history than has any other factor, and contrary opinion is wishful thinking at its worst. Breeds that forget this basic truth have always paid for it with their lives and freedom.
"The noblest fate that a man can endure is to place his own mortal body betwen his loved home and war's desolation."
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
In one of Robert Heinlein's most controversial best-sellers, a recruit of the future goes through the toughest boot camp in the Universe--and into battle against mankind's most frightening enemy.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0441783589, Mass Market Paperback)

Juan Rico signed up with the Federal Service on a lark, but despite the hardships and rigorous training, he finds himself determined to make it as a cap trooper. In boot camp he will learn how to become a soldier, but when he graduates and war comes (as it always does for soldiers), he will learn why he is a soldier. Many consider this Hugo Award winner to be Robert Heinlein's finest work, and with good reason. Forget the battle scenes and high-tech weapons (though this novel has them)--this is Heinlein at the top of his game talking people and politics.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:06:57 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

With Earth embroiled in a vast interplanetary war with the "Bugs," a young recruit in the Federal Reserves relates his experiences training in boot camp and as a junior officer in the Terran Mobile Infantry.

» see all 7 descriptions

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