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Take It or Leave It Challenge - November 2019 - Page 1

75 Books Challenge for 2019

Join LibraryThing to post.

1SqueakyChu
Edited: Oct 26, 7:08pm Top

For those new to this challenge: More info and monthly index can be found in post #1 of this thread or this TIOLI FAQS wiki.


...logo by cyderry

--------------------------------------------------​

For November, 2019, your challenge is to...

**************************************

Read a book that measures approximately 1 cm in thickness.

*************************************

Rules
1. Try to get the measurement as close to 1 cm as possible. That means that 0.5 cm is too thin and 1.5 cm is too thick.
2. When listing your book, list the meaurement as close as you can. Also list the number of pages in your book.
3. You should be able to get your book's thickness on the EDIT YOUR BOOK page. Just scroll down to Physical description and see if your book's thickness is listed under dimentions/thickness. If not, measure it yourself!
4. Yes, you may read a child's board book! :D

--------------------------------------------------​

Other Fun Stuff (not part of the TIOLI challenge):

1. The November 2019 TIOLI Meter - Optional page on which you may track your TIOLI reading. FYI: This is not meant to be competitive - only fun!
2. Morphidae's List of Previous TIOLI Challenges - You may use this reference (Do a control-F scan) to avoid repeating a previous challenge. If your idea is similar to a previous challenge, just make it unique by adding a new "twist" to it.
3. FAMeulstee's 2109 TIOLI Sweeplette Meter - Use this page if you want to complete a sweeplette (all of the challenges on only one wiki page)

2SqueakyChu
Edited: Nov 5, 5:23pm Top

Wiki Index of Challenges:

Challenges #1-6
1. Read a book that measures approximately 1 cm in thickness - msg #1
2. Read a book with the name of a city in the title - msg #3
3. Read a book with a title that mentions something you could recycle - msg #5
4. Finish an interrupted book - msg #6
5. Read a book that has a musical instrument in the title - msg #7
6. Read a book that has a haiku seasonal word/phrase on the cover - msg #9

Challenges #7-12
7. Read a book where the title completes the phrase "I am thankful for..." - msg #10
8. Read a book that has been adapted from / or into another form - msg #11
9. Read a book set in Western Europe - msg #12
10. Read a book by an author who has a sibling who is in the creative arts - msg #13
11. Read a book in which a profession of a drink is written - msg #16
12. Read a book where a word in the title reminds you of a childhood toy - msg #22

Challenges #13-18
13. Read a book about a utopia that either does or doesn’t work out - msg #23
14. Read a book where the first letter of the title starts with one of the letters in the word Grateful - msg #27
15. Read another book by an author you discovered in 2019l - msg #28
16. Read a book with a yellow and/or orange cover for the November birthstone challengel - msg #38
17. Read a book that features young person/s in peril - msg #44
18. Read a book by an author whose first name is Felix or Lars or one of these names appear in the first sentence - msg #49

Challenge #19
19. Read a book with a title containing up to 9 characters - msg #76

Hold your challenge until the December 2019 Challenges are posted. Thanks!

3lindapanzo
Edited: Oct 26, 7:39pm Top

Challenge #2: Read a book with the name of a city in the title

Pretty self-explanatory. The name of the city can be embedded but the entire name of the city must be included. So, a book with a title like The Chicagoan would be OK.

Note, too, that subtitles count so you can find your city name there.

Note also that the title must include the name of a city, not the name of a village, town, hamlet or any such smaller locations. Here's a list of 1,722 cities in the world...http://worldpopulationreview.com/world-cities/

Here's a list of American cities with over 100,000 people...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_cities_by_population

4lindapanzo
Oct 26, 7:29pm Top

I'm number 2, I'm number 2. Second straight month, I think.

5dallenbaugh
Oct 26, 7:58pm Top

Challenge #3: Read a book with a title that mentions something you could recycle

It can be furniture, paper, books, etc.

6lyzard
Edited: Oct 26, 8:03pm Top

Challenge #4: Finish an interrupted book

Various books might qualify. It could be a book you once started then set aside; something you've been dipping in and out of for ages; or a library book you had to return before you'd finished it. I will also accept library books borrowed before but returned without being started. :)

The only rule is that there should be a reasonable time lag between starting and finishing.

Please note when you started your book in the first place on the wiki. (Approximately will do if you're not sure.)

7Carmenere
Edited: Oct 26, 8:58pm Top

Challenge #5: Read a book that has a musical instrument in the title.

Embedded words are fine and encouraged.

8wandering_star
Oct 26, 10:13pm Top

>6 lyzard: This is a wonderful challenge! I have a small pile of books which have run into the sand, it's great to have an incentive to pick them up again.

9wandering_star
Edited: Oct 26, 10:30pm Top

Challenge #6: read a book with a 'haiku seasonal word/phrase' on the cover

I learnt recently that strictly speaking, a Japanese haiku needs to include one word which refers to a season. In the haiku tradition, this doesn't just mean a word like 'snow' or 'falling leaves' - there is a wide range of words which have a poetic seasonal link, eg frog = spring, iris = summer, moon = autumn.

Please use this list of words. If the 'seasonal phrase' has more than one word, that phrase needs to appear on the cover of your book to qualify - so the word 'cloud' would not be acceptable for this challenge, as it only appears on the list as part of a longer phrase. However if the seasonal word/phrase is plural, it's OK to use the singular (eg the list has the word "icicles" - it's OK if the word on your book cover is "icicle").

Embedded words are OK.

10Morphidae
Edited: Oct 26, 11:41pm Top

My "nth" annual November challenge:

Challenge #7: Read a book where the title completes the phrase "I am thankful for..."


Self-explanatory

11Dejah_Thoris
Oct 26, 11:45pm Top

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
TIOLI #8: Read a book that has been adapted from / or into another form. - started by Dejah_Thoris
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


This is a variation on some Challenges we’ve seen before. You can read either the original work or the adaptation, you just need to let us know which it is on the wiki. Some examples would be:

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (novel, made into a play)
Breakfast At Tiffany’s (novella, made into movie)
The Handmaid’s Tale: The Graphic Novel (graphic novel, adapted from novel)
Shore Leave (novel, made into movie Kiss Them For Me)
The Thorn Birds (novel, made in to TV mini-series)
Tipping the Velvet (play, based on the novel)

The adaptations need to be another version of the original work. So, for example, the very entertaining Rivers of London graphic novels wouldn’t count, because they cover events outside of the main series. Most of the Star Wars and Star Trek novels don’t work, unless they are a movie tie in, and reflect the plot of the film.

Audio books aren’t allowed, because they are usually verbatim versions of the original work.

If you have any questions, please ask!

12FAMeulstee
Edited: Oct 27, 5:26am Top

====
Challenge #9: Read a book set in Western Europe
====

According to Wikipedia Western Europe contains:
Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Ireland, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Monaco, Netherlands, Switzerland, and United Kingdom

13Helenliz
Edited: Oct 27, 9:35am Top

It's just about my little brother's birthday and two people less like each other it would be hard to imagine. He's 6 ft tall, blonde & very fit, I'm ... weeelllll I'm not. >;-) But while we are drastically different physically, we do share a trait, we have a scientific turn of mind. In honour of all baby brothers (and how annoying are they?) I have a challenge related to siblings:

====Challenge #10: Read a book by an author who has a sibling who is in the creative arts====

I'm going to be quite generous on what is a creative art, so you're not too constrained there. Please list the sibling's first name (and surname if they are different) and the branch of the creative arts the occupy.

I'll find a picture of us and add it, so you can have a laugh. Here we go: this is me holding my baby brother when he came home. I think that look is "what am I supposed to do with this"


14Morphidae
Oct 27, 9:32am Top

>11 Dejah_Thoris: I'm assuming you mean that audiobooks aren't considered an adaptation rather than not allowed at all? For instance, some one could listen to The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time?

15Dejah_Thoris
Oct 27, 9:43am Top

>14 Morphidae: Using your example, you could listen to an audio version of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, which is basically identical in content to the novel, because the play adaptation exists - so yes, you are correct!

16Ameise1
Edited: Oct 27, 10:13am Top

Challenge #11: Read a book in which a profession of a drink is written.

This is more or less self-explanatory. It is important that a protagonist has something to do with a particular beverage production.

17Ameise1
Oct 27, 10:16am Top

>7 Carmenere: Lynda, with my lips I can whistle, lips would therefore count as an instrument?

18SqueakyChu
Oct 27, 11:19am Top

>13 Helenliz: That is *such* a cute picture, Helen. Thanks for posting it!

19SqueakyChu
Oct 27, 11:21am Top

>11 Dejah_Thoris: I'm not sure I understand this. So an example might be that there is a description of a bartender in the narrative?

20Carmenere
Edited: Oct 27, 6:53pm Top

>17 Ameise1: and fingers can snap so along with lips, they'd be permitted too

21Ameise1
Oct 27, 12:34pm Top

>20 Carmenere: Thanks, Lynda.

22DeltaQueen50
Edited: Oct 27, 1:09pm Top

Challnge #12: Read A Book Where a Word in Title Reminds You of a Childhood Toy

Balls, Skates, Crayons, Dolls, Bats & board games, etc. This item can be a direct word from the title or can be embedded.

23Citizenjoyce
Oct 27, 1:18pm Top

Challenge #13: Read a book about a utopia whether it is successful or not
>10 Morphidae: put off reading Scythe last month so that I could join her this month if I could post a challenge for it. I think this works.

24Citizenjoyce
Edited: Nov 9, 9:01pm Top

Whew, I got here late this month. My planned reads
Challenge #1: Read a book that measures approximately 1 cm in thickness - started by SqueakyChu
*This is How You Lose the Time War (1.3cm 201 pages) - Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone
Challenge #2: Read a book with the name of a city in the title - started by lindapanzo
*Down and out in Paris and London - George Orwell
O Jerusalem - Laurie R. King
Challenge #3: Read a book with a title that mentions something you could recycle - started by dallenbaugh
The book of Gutsy Women: Favorite Stories of Courage and Resilience - Hillary Rodham Clinton and Chelsea Clinton
Challenge #4: Finish an interrupted book - started by lyzard
Drawing Down the Moon: Witches, Druids, Goddess-Worshippers and Other Pagans in America Today - Margot Adler
Challenge #5: Read a book that has a musical instrument in the title - started by Carmenere
*✔Sharp Objects - Gillian Flynn (2.5)
Challenge #6: Read a book that has a haiku seasonal word/phrase on the cover - started by wandering_star
*✔The Mushroom at the End of the World - Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing (4)
Challenge #7: Read a book where the title completes the phrase "I am thankful for..." - started by Morphidae
Tradition!: The Highly Improbable, Ultimately Triumphant Broadway-to-Hollywood Story of Fiddler on the Roof, the World's Most Beloved Musical - Barbara Isenberg (4)
Challenge #8: Read a book that has been adapted from / or into another form - started by Dejah_Thoris
Prime Suspect - Lydia LaPlante
Challenge #9: Read a book set in Western Europe - started by FAMeulstee
Gods and Beasts - Denise Mina
Mr. Loverman - Bernardine Evaristo (3.5
Challenge #10: Read a book by an author who has a sibling who is in the creative arts - started by helenliz
*City of Girls: A Novel - Elizabeth Gilbert
*The Tenant of Wildfell Hall - Anne Bronte
Challenge #11: Read a book in which a profession of a drink is written. - started by Ameise1
*A Deadly Brew - Lynn Cahoon
Challenge #12: Read a book where a word in the title reminds you of a childhood toy - started by DeltaQueen
*The Dutch House - Ann Patchett
Challenge #13: Read a book about a utopia that either does or doesn’t work out- started by Citizenjoyce
Scythe - Neal Shusterman
Challenge #14: Rolling Challenge – Read a book where the first letter of the title starts with one of the letters in the word Grateful - started by quondame
Escape from Asylum - Madeleine Roux
Ask Again, Yes: A Novel - Mary Beth Keane (3.5)
Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee - Casey Cep
Grimm's Fairy Tales - Brothers Grimm
Challenge #15: Read another book by an author you discovered in 2019 - started by susanna.fraser
The Drowning - Camilla Lackberg
Gods of Jade and Shadow - Silvia Moreno-Garcia
Challenge #16: Read a book with a yellow and/or orange cover for the November birthstone challenge - started by Humouress
Challenge #17: Read a book that features young person/s in peril - started by avatiakh
Beartown - Fredrik Backman RL Bookclub (5)
Tricks - Ellen Hopkins
Challenge #19: Read a book with a title containing up to 9 characters - Started by elkiedee
Identical - Ellen Hopkins




25lyzard
Oct 27, 4:23pm Top

>8 wandering_star:

It's a very self-serving challenge, so it's great to hear it's of use to others too! :)

26Dejah_Thoris
Edited: Nov 3, 6:52am Top

>13 Helenliz: I came up with a few artistic siblings, in addition to the Bronte's.

Joan Aiken - sister to author Jane Aiken Hodge
A. S. Byatt - sister to author Margaret Drabble
C. J. Cherryh - sister to artist David Cherry
Jackie Collins - sister to actor Joan Collins
Gerald Durrell - brother to author Lawrence Durrell
Joe Haldeman - brother to author Jay Haldeman aka Jack C. Haldeman
Elizabeth George - sister to author and brew master Robert Rivelle George
Elizabeth Gilbert - sister to author Catherine Gilbert Murdock
Attica Locke - sister to actress and author Tembi Locke
Klaus Mann - brother to authors Erika Mann, Golo Mann, and Monika Mann
Thomas Mann - brother to author Heinrich Mann
Liane Moriarty - sister to authors Jaclyn Moriarty and Nicola Moriarty
Virginia Wolf - sister to artist Vanessa Bell

ETA: Thanks for all the additional sibling suggestions!

27quondame
Edited: Oct 27, 9:49pm Top

Challenge #14: Rolling Challenge – Read a book where the first letter of the title starts with one of the letters in the word Grateful

You may either use or ignore any initial article. So A Good Hanging could be used for 'A' or 'G' and The First Eagle for 'T' or 'F'.

No skipping over letters.

28susanna.fraser
Oct 27, 11:59pm Top

Challenge #15: Read another book by an author you discovered in 2019

Read an author for the first time this year and enjoyed the book? Read another!

29Citizenjoyce
Oct 28, 12:55am Top

30dallenbaugh
Oct 28, 8:51am Top

>26 Dejah_Thoris: Also Elizabeth George who has an older brother who is a brewmaster and author Robert Rivelle George

31Helenliz
Oct 28, 9:17am Top

>26 Dejah_Thoris: & 30. Thank you both. I'm sure there are any number of talented siblings out there to choose from.

>18 SqueakyChu: thanks! he's a lot less cute these days, but is more likely to buy me a drink than he was back then >:-)

32wandering_star
Oct 28, 10:28am Top

>26 Dejah_Thoris: Very helpful! I have a couple of books by Attica Locke on the TBR so that's my choice made for this challenge.

33FAMeulstee
Edited: Oct 28, 11:55am Top

>26 Dejah_Thoris: Brothers Thomas Mann and Heinrich Mann were both writers.
Four children of Thomas Mann were also writers: Klaus Mann, Erika Mann, Golo Mann and Monika Mann.

34lindapanzo
Oct 28, 12:01pm Top

>28 susanna.fraser: This is a GREAT challenge for me. It'll let me read more mysteries from the books I've discovered via Net Galley and others. Wish I'd thought of it but I'm glad you did.

35PawsforThought
Oct 28, 12:34pm Top

>34 lindapanzo: Same. (Except for me it's Archive.org)

36quondame
Edited: Oct 28, 10:45pm Top

>13 Helenliz: >26 Dejah_Thoris: >33 FAMeulstee: C.J. Cherryh's brother David Cherry is an artist - he has done some covers for her.

37humouress
Edited: Oct 29, 3:09am Top

>36 quondame: (et al) ... and sisters Joan Aiken and Jane Aiken Hodge are both authors, albeit different genres.

>8 wandering_star:

38humouress
Edited: Nov 2, 3:46am Top

I decided to get here early this month to post the November birthstone challenge. There are two birthstones for November: citrine (which is yellow) and topaz which comes in several pretty colours but the most desirable, apparently, is imperial topaz - a rich orange colour so I will go with autumnal colours.



****************************************
Challenge 16: Read a book with a yellow and/or orange cover for the November birthstone challenge
****************************************


Please post your covers on the birthstone challenge covers thread

39quondame
Oct 29, 3:22am Top

>38 humouress: Challenge 14 has been taken, 15 too. Also Jasper is awfully close to Citrine/Topaz and we did that in September.

40humouress
Oct 29, 3:25am Top

>39 quondame: I noticed I had to change the number when I added it to the wiki, thanks.

Aaagh; there aren't enough colours in the rainbow to go with the number of months in the year! Let me see what I can find re colours ...

41quondame
Oct 29, 3:28am Top

>40 humouress: Astrological signs? Scorpio is promising....

42humouress
Edited: Oct 29, 4:09am Top

>41 quondame: I had a look and most gemstones come in a range of colours (so how do you know it's one and not another in real life?). I'm hoping to keep this going for a year so some colours - blue and white, for instance - will repeat.

Japer is more sandstone-y colour whereas topaz is a deeper orange. Most people's September books were in the sandstone range (but I notice yours was more orange-y). So I hope it doesn't throw out anyone's reading plans but I'm going to stay with the orange/ yellow cover for November. I will, as always, try to be as flexible as possible.

Having said which, I have no idea what I'm going to read. I see that chunkster The Dragon Reborn seems to be next on my Wheel of Time re-read; ooh - The Curse of Chalion might work ...

43quondame
Oct 29, 9:28pm Top

>2 SqueakyChu: #15 is in eclipse!

44avatiakh
Edited: Oct 29, 11:53pm Top

==================================================​
Challenge #17: Read a book that features young person/s in peril
==================================================​

I'm reading a fictional holocaust story about twins and another about the Nigerian schoolgirls who were kidnapped by Boko Haram in 2014.
Mapping the Bones by Jane Yolen
Girl: a novel by Edna O'Brien

45SqueakyChu
Oct 30, 3:15pm Top

>43 quondame: It's back. Thanks!

46lyzard
Oct 30, 6:49pm Top

For those interested, this month's Agatha Christie read is Hallowe'en Party...and I can't tell you how exasperated I am it didn't fall out for October! :D

I will probably be placing it in #17, though of course it also fits #8.

47PawsforThought
Oct 31, 3:15am Top

>46 lyzard: Argh, I've already read that one - and fairly recently so won't re-read this month. I'm planning on picking up N or M?, maybe followed by Hercule Poirot's Christmas - though that one will probably end up in December instead.

48lyzard
Oct 31, 4:02am Top

No worries! :)

49paulstalder
Oct 31, 4:34pm Top

Challenge #18: Read a book by an author whose first name is Felix or Lars or one of these names appear in the first sentence

In honor of my grandchild Felix Lars, I challenge you to read a book written by an author whose name is also Felix or Lars as first name (no embedded or hyphenated names).
Or read a book which has Felix, Lars, 4th October, 2,94 or 50 in the first sentence (when using the date please make sure it is the 4th October and not the 10th April; here the proper date is 2019.10.04 yymmdd)

Felix Lars, born 4th October 2019, 2.94 kg, 50 cm


50Helenliz
Oct 31, 5:05pm Top

>49 paulstalder: congratulations! He looks like a proper little munchkin. Hope he causes grandad just the right amount of trouble. >:-D

51humouress
Oct 31, 5:16pm Top

>49 paulstalder: Congratulations!

52paulstalder
Oct 31, 5:37pm Top

>50 Helenliz: thanks Helen. He did make some trouble already - he didn't breathe, so they had to reanimate him - but now he is okay and our star

>51 humouress: :) thanks

53Citizenjoyce
Oct 31, 7:04pm Top

>49 paulstalder: Congratulations

54Morphidae
Oct 31, 9:14pm Top

>49 paulstalder: Does Felix have to be a first name if it's in the first sentence?

55DeltaQueen50
Oct 31, 9:18pm Top

Congratulations, Paul. I am very proud to share a birthday with your lovely grandchild. :)

56SqueakyChu
Nov 1, 12:39am Top

>49 paulstalder: Welcome to the world of grandfatherhood, Paul! Your little Felix Lars is precious.

57paulstalder
Nov 1, 4:42am Top

>53 Citizenjoyce: thanks 😊

>54 Morphidae: no, not in the first sentence, there it can have any function; but not embedded.

>55 DeltaQueen50: so, late happy birthday, Judy 😘 It's good to have such forerunners in reading as you are, I hope he will become a reader, too, one day.

>56 SqueakyChu: Thanks Madeline. I call him 'the Happy Ice Bear' (Felix meaning happy, Lars after the Little Polar Bear series by Hans de Beer

58Morphidae
Edited: Nov 1, 4:11pm Top

I am not happy that the search function in Common Knowledge does NOT function if you search for "50" or "2." It comes back with too many results to display. Meh. Why not display the first 1,000 or so?

*shakes angry fist at the sky*

59Carmenere
Nov 1, 4:31pm Top

>49 paulstalder: So happy for you, Paul! Congratulations to all.

60paulstalder
Nov 1, 4:38pm Top

>58 Morphidae: sorry, I forgot that special feature of LT. It's worse when you leave the search field empty and just make a search for 'First words', in that case I get 982 pages of 200 works per page - but the first sentence is not totally shown, so I can't search for anything which is hidden, and open up every first-word-field is tedious ... 196'400 times .... I am still on it ----------

61paulstalder
Nov 1, 4:40pm Top

>59 Carmenere: thanks Lynda :)

62Dejah_Thoris
Nov 1, 10:55pm Top

>49 paulstalder: Congratulations on the adorable addition to your family, Paul!

63paulstalder
Nov 2, 6:52am Top

>62 Dejah_Thoris: Thanks, I am pretty happy with the addition :)

64paulstalder
Nov 2, 4:20pm Top

>12 FAMeulstee: according to wikipedia? not the German, French, Italian, Swedish wikipedia :) interesting (there was some heavy editing on the English wikipedia page within the last few months, latest edit today)

65FAMeulstee
Edited: Nov 2, 5:47pm Top

>64 paulstalder: Dutch is almost the same, only Andorra added and minus Czech Republic.
If you look closer on the editing, you will see that it is mainly vandalism and reverting vandalism.

ETA: So to prevent discussion, I added the list and link.

66paulstalder
Edited: Nov 2, 5:58pm Top

>65 FAMeulstee: yes, I have seen the vandalistic changes - I don't understand why people do such things. And the discussion if humanism is an event or not is also interesting ...
The Czech Republic would people here not regard as part of Western Europe - but it's interesting to include it

ETA: I didn't want to discuss the countries as such, I wanted to hint at the notion of WIKIPEDIA as a single entity, which it isn't :)

67FAMeulstee
Nov 2, 6:10pm Top

>66 paulstalder: Indeed Wikipedia isn't a whole, much information is cultural and language dependent. Our language is only spoken in two countries, so most Wikipedia entries are not disputed. With multi-country languages, like English and German it is probably more difficult to get consensus.
I often turn to the English or German versions, when there is no Dutch entry about a writer I want to know some more about.

I'll never understand vandalism on sites like Wikipedia.

68paulstalder
Nov 2, 6:21pm Top

>67 FAMeulstee: Even the Swiss entries of the same Swiss city/person etc. in German, French, Italian and Rumantsh vary widely- it is very interesting to compare the different contents :)

69lindapanzo
Nov 2, 8:29pm Top

Whew, I was worried there for a minute. Late last night, I finished the book I was reading at the end of last month and didn't have a planned spot for it in this month's TIOLI. I looked everywhere and then realized that books can be recycled.

70Morphidae
Nov 2, 9:58pm Top

>12 FAMeulstee: So if they aren't Western Europe, what are countries like Italy, Spain, and Portugal considered? I was highly surprised not to see them on the list

71humouress
Nov 2, 10:04pm Top

>66 paulstalder: >67 FAMeulstee: I've never understood wanton destruction for anything. Not something I see eye to eye with my kids on ...

72SqueakyChu
Edited: Nov 2, 10:26pm Top

>12 FAMeulstee: >70 Morphidae: This is from that linked wikipedia article:

"Western Europe is the region comprising the western part of Europe. Though the term Western Europe is commonly used, there is no consensus on which countries it comprise."

That clears it up, doesn't it?! ;)

73elkiedee
Nov 2, 11:05pm Top

I think that Wikipedia definition is a bit weird, but it also doesn't include Scandinavia - presumably the Scandinavian countries are "northern" Europe and Spain, Portugal and Italy "southern".

74FAMeulstee
Nov 3, 3:37am Top

>72 SqueakyChu: I was surprised how many different views/definitions of "Western Europe" exist.
I even found one definition that excluded Ireland and the UK, as it limited the definition to mainland Europe.

>73 elkiedee: You are right, in this definition Scandinavia belongs to Northern Europe and Italy, Portugal and Spain to Southern Europe. The other two European regions in this definition are Central Europe and East Europe.

75Dejah_Thoris
Nov 3, 8:13am Top

>26 Dejah_Thoris: Back at message 26, I've added in all the additional suggestions for author with creative siblings. It's not a bad little list - thanks, everyone.

In addition to reading a bunch of plays this month, I'm reading award nominated and winning SF&F for the SFFKIT over in the Category Challenge group. I'm hoping to read some new authors and to include shorter fiction in the mix - short stories, novelettes, and novellas. When I read something available free online, I'll add a link here on the main thread in the hope that someone (or several someones) will join me. Hooray for shared reads!

First up is Cat Pictures, Please by Naomi Kritzer. It's a short story that was nominated for a Nebula and won both a Hugo and a Locus Award. It can be read for free, HERE . I have this story listed in Morphy's Challenge #7.

It didn't win any awards, but I'll also share a link to P. Djeli Clark's A Dead Djinn in Cairo, which I have listed in Linda's Challenge #2. It's in the same world as Clark's The Haunting of Tram Car 015, which I really enjoyed (it's in Susanna's Challenge #15, btw). I'll probably read it tonight, and if anyone wants to join me, it's available HERE .

More to come!

76elkiedee
Nov 4, 3:43pm Top

Challenge 19: Read a book with a title containing up to 9 characters

These can be letters, numbers, punctuation marks - spaces don't count in this case. Punctuation marks count, including colons, exclamation and question marks, dashes, brackets etc.

Unnecessary subtitles such as "a novel" don't count but words which are printed as part of the title do.
eg a if short story collection XYZ has Selected Stories on a separate line in a different font, that doesn't count, but if it's XYZ and Other Stories or XYZ: Selected Stories all in the same size font, it does count and you won't be able to use that title.

77quondame
Nov 8, 7:37pm Top

>76 elkiedee: Raven Black is 10 non-space characters long, but only contains 9 characters. Would it qualify?

78elkiedee
Nov 8, 8:24pm Top

No, I'm talking about characters in the sense of letters, symbols etc and that is 2 5 letter words - 10 characters.

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