HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Death Comes for the Archbishop (1927)

by Willa Cather

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
5,2481291,650 (3.99)2 / 754
In 1851 Bishop Latour and his friend Father Valliant are despatched to New Mexico to reawaken its slumbering Catholicism. Moving along the endless prairies, Latour spreads his faith the only way he knows-gently, although he must contend with the unforgiving landscape, derelict and sometimes openly rebellious priests, and his own loneliness. Over nearly years, they leave converts and enemies, crosses, and occasionally ecstasy in their wake. But it takes a death for them to make their mark on the landscape forever.… (more)
  1. 00
    The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse by Louise Erdrich (noveltea)
  2. 01
    The Professor's House by Willa Cather (shaunie)
    shaunie: If you enjoy Cather's wonderful writing this is just as well written and has a much more enthralling story.
  3. 01
    Lamy of Santa Fe by Paul Horgan (inge87)
    inge87: Biography of the real-life Jean Marie Latour — Archbishop Lamy
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

English (127)  Spanish (2)  All languages (129)
Showing 1-5 of 127 (next | show all)
An episodic book about two French missionaries who go to New Mexico soon after the end of the Mexican-American War (1848). Written in 1927, it does an amazing job of capturing the perspectives of the colonialists, the Mexicans and the tribes struggling for survival. A study in contrasts, it details how each of its two main characters deals with what he considers his own mission in life. The New Mexico landscape and weather are characters that serve to accentuate the implacable aspect of the setting – dramatic, unpredictable and austere. A novel about religious people that somehow avoids being about religion. Even the obvious biases that Cather brings to the book are not conveyed as preachy or overbearing. Much of what is said is said in an understated and natural way that avoids the judgmental and emphasizes empathy. A slim yet monumental book with a multi-faceted message about life. ( )
  dbsovereign | May 6, 2022 |
In making my way through Wila Cather, this was the first one that did nothing for me. I was completely disinterested in the characters, there seemed to be no discernable plot line or general purpose to it and I could barely keep track of who was who. Perhaps the scenery of the desert Southwest is a redeeming feature but not enough for me.
  amyem58 | Apr 24, 2022 |
Here's what I wrote after reading in 1986: "A love story really. Two French missionaries serve the Mexican and Native Americans of the New Mexico region in the mid 19th century. As Father Latour, first bishop of the diocese, dies he recalls most his life-long friend, Father Vaillant." ( )
  MGADMJK | Jan 3, 2022 |
This is a true giant in American Southwest literature. The author's weaving of a tale that involves complex characters from diverse backgrounds makes this novel interesting and worth reading. Not only did I enjoy the book but I learned a lot about indigenous cultures and the impact of the church in the American Southwest. ( )
  dmbg | Sep 12, 2021 |
Beautiful prose and breathtaking descriptions of the New Mexican landscape. There's not much in the way of a plot here, this is mostly a collection of vignettes depicting the lives of two French priests who established a diocese in the New Mexico Territory of the mid-1800s. Each story reveals their devotion to the church and to their calling by the service they give to their parishioners, Mexican and Native alike. I'm disappointed that parts of this have not aged well - in places the way praise is given to those same people comes across as patriarchal and condescending now. But the writing itself has aged remarkably well - its clarity and eloquence made this a pleasure to read even though it was first published over 90 years ago. ( )
  wandaly | Sep 10, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 127 (next | show all)
Each event in this book is concrete, yet symbolic, and opens into living myth. The reader is invited to contemplate the question: What is a life well lived? This question is asked in a story so fine it brings the old words “wisdom” and “beauty” to life again.
 

» Add other authors (20 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Willa Catherprimary authorall editionscalculated
Byatt, A. S.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
One summer evening in the year 1848, three Cardinals and a missionary Bishop from America were dining together in the gardens of a villa in the Sabine hills, overlooking Rome.
Quotations
But in reality the Bishop was not there at all [on his sickbed, in his wandering imagination]; he was standing in a tip-tilted green field among his native mountains, and he was trying to give consolation to a young man who was being torn in two before his eyes by the desire to go and the necessity to stay. He was trying to forge a new Will in that devout and exhausted priest; and the time was short, for the diligence for Paris was already rumbling down the mountain gorge.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

In 1851 Bishop Latour and his friend Father Valliant are despatched to New Mexico to reawaken its slumbering Catholicism. Moving along the endless prairies, Latour spreads his faith the only way he knows-gently, although he must contend with the unforgiving landscape, derelict and sometimes openly rebellious priests, and his own loneliness. Over nearly years, they leave converts and enemies, crosses, and occasionally ecstasy in their wake. But it takes a death for them to make their mark on the landscape forever.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
One summer evening in the year of 1848 three Cardinals and a missionary, dining in a villa near Rome, decide the fate of a simple parish priest, the Frenchman Jean Marie Latour. He is to go to New Mexico to win for Catholicism the South-West of America, a country where the Faith has slumbered for centuries. There, together with his old friend Father Vaillant, Latour makes his home. To the carnelian hills and ochre-yellow deserts of this almost pagan land he brings the refined traditions of French culture and Christian belief. Slowly, gently he reforms and revivifies, after forty years of love and service achieving a final reconciliation between his faith and the sensual peasant people of New Mexico: a harmony embodied in the realisation of his most cherished dream - a Romanesque cathedral, carved from the Mexican rock, gold as sunlight.
Haiku summary

Legacy Library: Willa Cather

Willa Cather has a Legacy Library. Legacy libraries are the personal libraries of famous readers, entered by LibraryThing members from the Legacy Libraries group.

See Willa Cather's legacy profile.

See Willa Cather's author page.

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.99)
0.5 1
1 8
1.5 4
2 41
2.5 12
3 186
3.5 54
4 356
4.5 64
5 307

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 171,827,950 books! | Top bar: Always visible